A cup of hot tea to welcome you!


This is Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Wikiafripedia is aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.
WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

A cup of hot tea to welcome you!

Welcome to Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.


WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

2020 China–India skirmishes

From Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions or browse at zero-rating.
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Sino–India skirmish
India China Locator.svg
World map with China and India highlighted
Date5 May 2020–ongoing
Location
Line of Actual Control (LAC),
Indo-China border
Belligerents
 China  India
Units involved
Template:Armed forces  Indian Army
Casualties and losses
7 injured (in Sikkim) 4 injured (in Sikkim)

Since 5 May 2020, Chinese and Indian troops were reported to have engaged in non-lethal aggressive action, face-offs and skirmishes at multiple locations along the Sino-Indian border. Skirmishes have taken place near the Pangong Lake in Ladakh and the Nathu La pass in Sikkim. In addition, face-offs are ongoing at multiple locations in eastern Ladakh, along the Line of Actual Control that has persisted from the 1962 Sino-Indian War. Most significant of them is at the Galwan River valley, where the Chinese forces objected to Indian road construction within Indian territory.[1][2]

Background and causes[edit source | edit]

The border between China and India is disputed at twenty different locations. Since the 1980s, there have been over 20 rounds of talks between the two countries related to these border issues.[3] An ORF study points out that only 1% to 2% of border incidents between 2010 and 2014 received any form of media coverage.[3][4]

The Shyam Saran Report in 2013 revealed that India had lost 640 km² (~247 mi²) due to "area denial" by Chinese patrolling.[5][6]

Multiple reasons have been cited as the triggers for these skirmishes. MIT professor Taylor Fravel said that China is responding to India's infrastructure development in Ladakh, such as the Darbuk–Shyok–DBO Road. He also added that it is a show of strength for China amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, which originated in Wuhan and has damaged both the Chinese economy and its diplomatic relationships. India's former ambassador to China Ashok Kantha said that these skirmishes are part of a growing Chinese assertiveness in both the Indo-China border and the South China sea.[7]

Pangong Tso incidents[edit source | edit]

The first standoff began on 5 May when Indian and Chinese soldiers clashed at Pangong Tso lake, which is a lake extends from India to the Tibetan Autonomous Region, China.[8] A video shows soldiers from both nations engaged in fistfights and stone-pelting along the Line of Actual Control.[9] On 10/11 May, another clash had taken place.[10] The last time such an incident occurred was also at Pangong Tso in August 2017.[11] The Doklam standoff in 2017 lasted for 73 days.[12][13]

Lukung, Pangong Tso, where the Line of Actual Control is being disputed.[5]

Indian Ambassador P. Stobdan writes in The Indian Express on 26 May that the Chinese are trying to take the lake at Pangong Tso (Lukung), which would essentially force India to redraw its borders, also possibly even exposing Siachen to Chinese presence.[5] The LAC passes through the lake at Pangong Tso.[14]

After the conflict, several Chinese military helicopters were spotted flying near the Indian border at least twice. India then deployed several Sukhoi Su-30MKI jets to the area, although whether this was due to the Chinese actions remains unclear. It was wrongfully reported that the Chinese helicopters had violated Indian airspace repeatedly.[15] The Government of India later rectified and stated that the Chinese helicopters did not actually invade India's airspace.[16] The media though reported that the Chinese approached Indian soldiers with "sticks" and "clubs with barbed wires" during a stand-off in the area.[17]

Sikkim incidents[edit source | edit]

According to Indian media reports, on 10 May, the spat began when the Chinese intruded into the Muguthang Valley and shouted to the Indian troops: "This (Sikkim) is not your land, this is not Indian territory... so just go back". Following this, an Indian Army lieutenant punched the Chinese major on his nose, making him bleed.[18] The other Indian troops present pulled back the lieutenant quickly.[18] Several troops numbering 11 men were left slightly injured in the encounter, of which 7 were Chinese soldiers and 4 were Indian ones, according to CNN's Indian affiliate CNN-News18.[19][20][21] Press Trust of India reported that the incident involved 150 soldiers; stones were also thrown.[12]

Following the incident, the lieutenant involved, who was a third-generation military recruit, was called back from the area.[10] An Indian army eastern command spokesman said that the matter was "resolved after 'dialogue and interaction' at a local level" and that "temporary and short-duration face-offs between border-guarding troops do occur as boundaries are not resolved. Troops resolve such issues mutually as per established protocols".[12][13] China did not share details about the incident, with the Chinese Ministry of National Defense not confirming the happening of the incident either.[22] The Chinese foreign ministry though stated "Chinese soldiers were always upholding peace and tranquility along the border".[22]

Eastern Ladakh incidents[edit source | edit]

<maplink zoom="9" latitude="34.8" longitude="78.30" text="[Interactive fullscreen map]">

[


{"type": "FeatureCollection",

 "features": [


{ "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Darbuk", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.1205908,78.1034063",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1034063,34.1205908] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Shyok village", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.1780836,78.1399135",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1399135,34.1780836] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Chhumed village", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.4643641,78.2740544",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.2740544,34.4643641] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Mundro village", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.6095461,78.1872189",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1872189,34.6095461] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Mandaltang village", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.7015420,78.1471681",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1471681,34.7015420] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Sultan Chhushku village", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 34.9637458,78.0026936",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.0026936,34.9637458] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Murgo", 
   "description": "Village in the Nubra tehsil 35.0414263,77.9373021",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.9373021,35.0414263] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Burtsa Gongma", 
   "description": "Locality close to the LAC 35.1199040,78.0379510",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.0379510,35.1199040] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Qizil Langar", 
   "description": "Campground close to the LAC 35.2873800,77.9653361",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.9653361,35.2873800] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Daulat Beg Oldi (DBO)", 
   "description": "Indian Army base with an Advanced Landing  Ground 35.3914432,77.9211371",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.9211371,35.3914432] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Hot Springs", 
   "description": "Indian Army checkpost 34.30,78.95",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.95,34.30] }
}









, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Shyok River flowing north", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Indus River 34.636,77.4529",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.4529,34.636] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Shyok River flowing north", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Indus River 34.3699,77.7894",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.7894,34.3699] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Shyok River flowing south", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Indus River 34.8375,78.1416",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1416,34.8375] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Shyok River flowing north", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Indus River 35.1596,77.7118",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [77.7118,35.1596] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Changchenmo River", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Shyok River 34.288,78.544",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.544,34.288] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Galwan River", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Shyok River 34.6605,78.5413",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.5413,34.6605] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Raki Nala", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Shyok River 35.156,78.1612",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.1612,35.156] }
}

, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Chip Chap River", 
   "description": "Tributary of the Shyok River 35.3016,78.2704",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.2704,35.3016] }
}


, { "type": "Feature",

  "properties": {
   "title": "Karakash River", 
   "description": "Drains into the Tarim Basin 34.9504,78.5595",
   "marker-symbol": "-number", "marker-size": "medium", "marker-color": "#AA1205" },
  "geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [78.5595,34.9504] }
}
































] }

]</maplink>
Eastern Ladakh locations

The Indian Express reported on 21 May that the Chinese troops had entered the Indian territory in the Galwan River valley, citing objections to Indian road construction within (undisputed) Indian territory. The road under construction is said to branch off from the Darbuk–Shyok–DBO Road and lead into the Galwan valley.[lower-alpha 1] "The Chinese have moved troops to the area, pitched 70-80 tents and parked heavy vehicles and monitoring equipment, not very far from the Indian side," said the report.[23]

A later report on 24 May said that the Chinese soldiers had crossed into the Indian territory at three places: Hot Springs, Patrolling Point 14 and Patrolling Point 15. At each of these places, around 800–1000 Chinese soldiers are reported to have crossed over for about 2–3 km, pitching tents and deploying heavy vehicles and monitoring equipment. It added that Indian troops have also been deployed in the area at a distance of 300–500 metres.[2][1]

According to EurAsian Times, the Chinese have a huge build-up including military-style bunkers, new permanent structures, military trucks, and road-building equipment. It quoted an Indian official calling it "the most dangerous situation since 1962".[24] The Hindu quoted officials as stating that the stand of China is not tenable. "This amounted to a change in the status quo and would not be acceptable to India in any manner."[25]

The Chinese Communist Party (CCP)-run newspaper Global Times blamed India for the stand-off claiming that India had "illegally constructed defence facilities across the border into Chinese territory in the Galwan Valley region". Long Xingchun, a senior research fellow at the Beijing Foreign Studies University wrote that the border friction was "not caused by accident". "India has been clearly and definitely aware that the Galwan Valley region is Chinese territory."[26]

Xi Jinping, CCP General Secretary and Central Military Commission chairman,[27] on 26 May urged the military "to think about worst-case scenarios" and "scale up battle preparedness". He said that the COVID-19 pandemic brought a profound impact on the global landscape and China's security and development.[26]

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has reviewed the current situation in Ladakh with National Security Adviser Ajit Doval and the Chief of Defence Staff Bipin Rawat.[28]

The Chinese Ambassador to India as well as a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman made statements on 27 May 2020 to the effect that the overall situation is stable.[29] However, a day later on May 28, thousands of soldiers belonging to China's People's Liberation Army began moving into disputed regions along the Himalayan border in Ladakh, prompting India to deploy several infantry battalions from the provincial capital of Leh.[30]

See also[edit source | edit]

Notes[edit source | edit]

  1. The Darbuk–Shyok–DBO Road is the first border road constructed by India in the Shyok River valley. Started in 2000, it was completed recently in April 2019.

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Philip, Snehesh Alex (24 May 2020). "Chinese troops challenge India at multiple locations in eastern Ladakh, standoff continues". ThePrint.in.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Sushant Singh, Chinese intrusions at 3 places in Ladakh, Army chief takes stock, The Indian Express, 24 May 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ladwig, Walter (21 May 2020). "Not the 'Spirit of Wuhan': Skirmishes Between India and China". RUSI. Retrieved 26 May 2020.
  4. Bhonsale, Mihir (12 February 2018). "Understanding Sino-Indian border issues: An analysis of incidents reported in the Indian media". Observer Research Foundation. Retrieved 2020-05-26.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Stobdan, P (2020-05-26). "As China intrudes across LAC, India must be alert to a larger strategic shift". The Indian Express. Retrieved 2020-05-27.
  6. "Shyam Saran: Shyam Saran denies any report on Chinese incursions". The Times of India. 6 September 2013. Retrieved 2020-05-27.
  7. "Indian border infrastructure or Chinese assertiveness? Experts dissect what triggered China border moves". The Indian Express. 26 May 2020.
  8. "India and China face off along disputed Himalayan border". Nikkei Asian Review. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  9. "'All-out combat' feared as India, China engage in border standoff". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Bhaumik, Subir (11 May 2020). "Sikkim & Ladakh face-offs: China ups ante along India-Tibet border". The Quint. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  11. "India China Sikkim border: Indian, Chinese troops clash near Naku La in Sikkim sector". The Times of India. 10 May 2020. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 France-Presse, Agence (11 May 2020). "Indian and Chinese soldiers injured in cross-border fistfight, says Delhi". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Som, Vishnu (10 May 2020). Sanyal, Anindita (ed.). "India, China troops clash in Sikkim, pull back after dialogue". NDTV. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  14. Singh, Sushant (2020-05-22). "India-China conflict in Ladakh: The importance of Pangong Tso lake". The Indian Express. Retrieved 2020-05-27.
  15. "Chinese helicopters spotted along Sino-India border in Eastern Ladakh: Sources". The Times of India. 12 May 2020.
  16. "No airspace violation by China: Govt sources". The Times of India. 12 May 2020. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  17. "'Unprofessional' Chinese Army used sticks, clubs with barbed wires and stones in face-off near Pangong Tso". The Times of India. 26 May 2020. Retrieved 2020-05-27.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Bhaumik, Subir (11 May 2020). "Sikkim clash: 'Small' Indian lt who punched a 'big' Chinese major". The Quint.
  19. Vedika Sud; Ben Westcott (11 May 2020). "Chinese and Indian soldiers engage in 'aggressive' cross-border skirmish". CNN. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  20. "Army confirms India-China face-off, minor injuries to both sides". Hindustan Times. 10 May 2020. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  21. Peri, Dinakar (10 May 2020). "India, China troops face off at Naku La in Sikkim, several injured". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Patranobis, Sutirtho (11 May 2020). Tripathi, Ashutosh (ed.). "'Should work together, fight Covid-19': China to India after Sikkim face-off". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  23. Singh, Sushant (2020-05-21). "India builds road north of Ladakh lake, China warns of 'necessary counter-measures'". The Indian Express.
  24. Dinakar Peri, Deliberations on to resolve LAC tensions, The Hindu, 25 May 2020.
  25. 26.0 26.1 Ananth Krishnan, Chinese President Xi Jinping meets PLA, urges battle preparedness, The Hindu, 26 May 2020.
  26. Li, Nan (2018-02-26). "Party Congress Reshuffle Strengthens Xi's Hold on Central Military Commission". The Jamestown Foundation . Retrieved 2020-05-27. Xi Jinping has introduced major institutional changes to strengthen his control of the PLA in his roles as Party leader and chair of the Central Military Commission (CMC)...
  27. Dinakar Peri, India-China LAC standoff | Narendra Modi reviews situation with NSA, CDS and 3 Service Chiefs, The Hindu, 26 May 2020.
  28. "'Differences Should Not Overshadow Relations': China Downplays Border Standoff, Says Situation Controllable". News18. 2020-05-27. Retrieved 2020-05-27.
  29. China and India move troops as border tensions escalate

Visibility[edit source | edit]

This page has been added to search engine indexes. learn more