2020 Democratic Party presidential candidates

From Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions or browse at zero-rating.
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Candidates associated with the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 United States presidential election:

Major candidates[edit source | edit]

Candidates who are on the ballot in a minimum of fifteen states. As of April 8, 2020, there is one current major candidate, Joe Biden.

Presumptive nominee[edit source | edit]

Name Born Experience Home state Campaign announced Article Ref.

Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 78)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009–2017)
U.S. senator from Delaware (1973–2009)
Candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
Flag of Delaware.svg
Delaware
April 25, 2019 Joe Biden 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[1]
[2]

Withdrew during the primaries[edit source | edit]

Candidates who were major candidates who withdrew or suspended their campaigns after the Iowa caucuses or succeeding primary elections.

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign announced Campaign suspended Article Refs
Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg
Bernie Sanders
September 8, 1941
(age 80)
Brooklyn, New York
U.S. senator from Vermont (2007–present)
U.S. representative from VT-AL (1991–2007)
Mayor of Burlington, Vermont (1981–1989)
Candidate for President in 2016
Template:Country data Vermont February 19, 2019 April 8, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Bernie Sanders 2020 logo.svg
Campaign

FEC filing[3]

[4][5]
Tulsi Gabbard (48011616441) (cropped).jpg
Tulsi Gabbard
April 12, 1981
(age 40)
Leloaloa, American Samoa
U.S. representative from HI-02 (2013–present)

Member of the Honolulu City Council (2011–2012)
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives (2002–2004)

Template:Country data Hawaii January 11, 2019 March 19, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Tulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaign logo black.svg
Campaign

FEC filing[6]

[7][8]
Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Elizabeth Warren
June 22, 1949
(age 72)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
U.S. senator from Massachusetts (2013–present) Template:Country data Massachusetts February 9, 2019
Exploratory Committee: December 31, 2018
March 5, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[9]
[10][11]
Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Michael Bloomberg
February 14, 1942
(age 79)
Boston, Massachusetts
Mayor of New York City, New York (2002–2013)
CEO of Bloomberg L.P.
Template:Country data New York November 24, 2019
Exploratory committee: November 21, 2019
March 4, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Mike Bloomberg 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[12]
[13][14]

\

Amy Klobuchar by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Amy Klobuchar
May 25, 1960
(age 61)
Plymouth, Minnesota
U.S. senator from Minnesota (2007–present) Template:Country data Minnesota February 10, 2019 March 2, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Amy Klobuchar 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[15]
[16][17]
Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Pete Buttigieg
January 19, 1982
(age 39)
South Bend, Indiana
Mayor of South Bend, Indiana (2012–2020) Template:Country data Indiana
April 14, 2019 March 1, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Pete for America logo (Strato Blue).svg
Campaign

FEC filing[18]

[19][20]
Tom Steyer by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Tom Steyer
June 27, 1957
(age 64)
Manhattan, New York
Hedge fund manager
Founder of Farallon Capital, Beneficial State Bank, and NextGen America
 California
July 9, 2019 February 29, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Tom Steyer 2020 logo (black text).svg
Campaign
FEC filing[21]
[22][23]
Deval Patrick 2016.jpg
Deval Patrick
July 31, 1956
(age 65)
Chicago, Illinois
Governor of Massachusetts (2007–2015) Template:Country data Massachusetts November 14, 2019 February 12, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Devallogo2020.png
Campaign
FEC filing[24]
[25][26]
Michael Bennet by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Michael Bennet
November 28, 1964
(age 56)
New Delhi, India
U.S. senator from Colorado (2009–present) Template:Country data Colorado May 2, 2019 February 11, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
Michael Bennet 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[27]
[28][29]
Andrew Yang by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Andrew Yang
January 13, 1975
(age 46)
Schenectady, New York
Entrepreneur
Founder of Venture for America
Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship (2015–2017)
Template:Country data New York November 6, 2017 February 11, 2020
(endorsed Biden) [30]
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[31]
[32][33]

Withdrew before Iowa caucuses but remained on ballots[edit source | edit]

Candidates withdrew too late to remove their names from several state ballots and remained on at least two:[34][35]

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Article Ref.
John Delaney by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John Delaney
April 16, 1963
(age 58)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
U.S. representative from MD-06 (2013–2019) Template:Country data Maryland July 28, 2017 January 31, 2020
(endorsed Biden)
John Delaney 2020 logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[36]
[37][38]
Cory Booker by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Cory Booker
April 27, 1969
(age 52)
Washington, D.C.
U.S. senator from New Jersey (2013–present)
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey (2006–2013)
Template:Country data New Jersey February 1, 2019 January 13, 2020 (endorsed Biden) Cory Booker 2020 Logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[39]
[40]
Marianne Williamson November 2019.jpg
Marianne Williamson
July 8, 1952
(age 69)
Houston, Texas
Author
Founder of Project Angel Food
Independent candidate for U.S. House from CA-33 in 2014
 California January 28, 2019
Exploratory committee: November 15, 2018
January 27, 2019
January 10, 2020
(endorsed Sanders)
Marianne Williamson 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
[41]
Julian Castro 2019 crop.jpg
Julián Castro
September 16, 1974
(age 47)
San Antonio, Texas
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017)
Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009–2014)
Template:Country data Texas January 12, 2019 January 2, 2020 (endorsed Warren, then Biden) Julian Castro 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
[42]
Kamala Harris by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Kamala Harris
October 20, 1964
(age 56)
Oakland, California
U.S. senator from California (2017–present)
Attorney General of California (2011–2017)
 California January 21, 2019 December 3, 2019
(endorsed Biden)[43]
Kamala Harris 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[44]
[45][46]
Steve Bullock by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Steve Bullock
April 11, 1966
(age 55)
Missoula, Montana
Governor of Montana (2013–present)
Attorney General of Montana (2009–2013)
Template:Country data Montana May 14, 2019 December 2, 2019 (running for U.S. Senate) Steve Bullock 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[47]
[48][49]
Joe Sestak August 2019 (3) (cropped).jpg
Joe Sestak
December 12, 1951
(age 69)
Secane, Pennsylvania
U.S. representative from PA-07 (2007–2011)
Former Vice Admiral of the United States Navy
Template:Country data Pennsylvania June 23, 2019 December 1, 2019
(endorsed Klobuchar)[50]
Campaign
FEC filing[51]
[52][53]

Withdrew without appearing on primary ballots[edit source | edit]

Candidates who were major candidates who withdrew or suspended their campaigns before the 2020 Democratic primary elections began and are not on the ballot for the presidential primaries anywhere.

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign
announced
Campaign
suspended
Article Ref.
Wayne Messam by Marc Nozell (cropped).jpg
Wayne Messam
June 7, 1974
(age 47)
South Bay, Florida
Mayor of Miramar, Florida (2015–present) Template:Country data Florida March 28, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 13, 2019
November 19, 2019 Wayne Messam 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[54]
[55][56]
Beto O'Rourke April 2019.jpg
Beto O'Rourke
September 26, 1972
(age 49)
El Paso, Texas
U.S. representative from TX-16 (2013–2019) Template:Country data Texas March 14, 2019 November 1, 2019
(endorsed Biden)
Beto O'Rourke 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[57]
[58][59]
Tim Ryan by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Tim Ryan
July 16, 1973
(age 48)
Niles, Ohio
U.S. representative from OH-13 (2013–present)
U.S. representative from OH-17 (2003–2013)
Template:Country data Ohio April 4, 2019 October 24, 2019
(running for re-election)
(endorsed Biden)[60]
Timryan2020.png
Campaign
FEC filing[61]
[62][63]
Bill de Blasio by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Bill de Blasio
May 8, 1961
(age 60)
Manhattan, New York
Mayor of New York City, New York (2014–present) Template:Country data New York May 16, 2019 September 20, 2019
(endorsed Sanders)[64]
Bill de Blasio 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[65]
[66][67]
Kirsten Gillibrand August 2019.jpg
Kirsten Gillibrand
December 9, 1966
(age 54)
Albany, New York
U.S. senator from New York (2009–present)
U.S. representative from NY-20 (2007–2009)
Template:Country data New York March 17, 2019
Exploratory committee: January 15, 2019
August 28, 2019
(endorsed Biden)
Gillibrand 2020 logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[68]
[69][70]
Seth Moulton August 2019.jpg
Seth Moulton
October 24, 1978
(age 42)
Salem, Massachusetts
U.S. representative from MA-06 (2015–present) Template:Country data Massachusetts April 22, 2019 August 23, 2019
(running for re-election)[71]
(endorsed Biden)
Seth Moulton 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[72]
[73][74]
Jay Inslee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Jay Inslee
February 9, 1951
(age 70)
Seattle, Washington
Governor of Washington (2013–present)
U.S. representative from WA-01 (1999–2012)
Template:Country data Washington March 1, 2019 August 21, 2019
(running for re-election)[75]
(endorsed Biden)[76]

Campaign
FEC filing[77]
[78][79]
John Hickenlooper by Gage Skidmore.jpg
John Hickenlooper
February 7, 1952
(age 69)
Narberth, Pennsylvania
Governor of Colorado (2011–2019)
Mayor of Denver, Colorado (2003–2011)
Template:Country data Colorado March 4, 2019 August 15, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate)
(endorsed Bennet)[80]
John Hickenlooper 2020 presidential campaign logo.png
Campaign
FEC filing[81]
[82][83]

Mike Gravel
May 13, 1930
(age 91)
Springfield, Massachusetts
U.S. senator from Alaska (1969–1981)
Candidate for President in 2008
Candidate for Vice President of the United States in 1972
 California April 2, 2019
Exploratory committee: March 19, 2019
August 6, 2019
(endorsed Gabbard and Sanders)
Gravel Mg web logo line two color.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[84]
[85][86]
Eric Swalwell (48016282941) (cropped).jpg
Eric Swalwell
November 16, 1980
(age 40)
Sac City, Iowa
U.S. representative from CA-15 (2013–present)  California April 8, 2019 July 8, 2019
(running for re-election)[87]
(endorsed Biden)[88]
Eric Swalwell 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign
FEC filing[89]
[90][91]
MAJ Richard Ojeda.jpg
Richard Ojeda
September 25, 1970
(age 51)
Rochester, Minnesota
West Virginia state senator from WV-SD07 (2016–2019) Template:Country data West Virginia November 11, 2018 January 25, 2019
(running for U.S. Senate)[92]

Campaign
FEC filing[93]

[94][95]

Other candidates[edit source | edit]

On the ballot in at least one state[edit source | edit]

There are over 250 who have filed with the FEC declaring that they are candidates; however, very few have actually made the effort to get their names on the ballot anywhere.[34] The following have:

  • Mosie Boyd, Arkansas
    Total votes: 2,062
  • Steve Burke, New York
    Total votes: 252
  • Nathan Bloxham, Utah
    Total votes: 69
  • Jason Evritte Dunlap, Maryland
    Total votes: 12
  • Michael A. Ellinger, California
    Total votes: 3,634
  • Roque De La Fuente III‡, California
    Total votes: 13,584
  • Ben Gleib, California
    Total votes: 31
  • Mark Stewart Greenstein, Connecticut
    Total votes: 3,330
  • Henry Hewes, New York
    Total votes: 315
  • Tom Koos, California
    Total votes: 72
  • Lorenz Kraus, New York
    Total votes: 52
  • Rita Krichevsky, New Jersey
    Total votes: 468
  • Raymond Michael Moroz, New York
    Total votes: 8
  • Sam Sloan, New York
    Total votes: 34
  • David John Thistle, Massachusetts
    Total votes: 53
  • Thomas James Torgesen, New York
    Total votes: 30
  • Robby Wells, Georgia
    Total votes: 1,960

Roque De La Fuente III is the son of perennial candidate Rocky De La Fuente and is not the same individual.

Not on the ballot anywhere[edit source | edit]

Individuals who did not meet the criteria to become major candidates have either formally terminated their campaigns or did not attempt to get on the ballot in a single contest:

Declined to be candidates[edit source | edit]

These individuals have been the subject of presidential speculation, but have publicly denied or recanted interest in running for president.

See also[edit source | edit]

Notes[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 This individual is not a member of the Democratic Party, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.
  1. 1.0 1.1 This individual is not registered to the political party of this section, but has been the subject of speculation and/or expressed interest in running under this party.

References[edit source | edit]

  1. "Statement of Candidacy by Joseph R Biden Jr" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. April 25, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  2. Burns, Alexander (April 25, 2019). "Joe Biden Is Running for President, After Months of Hesitation". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 25, 2019. Retrieved April 25, 2019.
  3. "Statement of Candidacy by Bernard Sanders" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 19, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 21, 2019. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  4. News, V. P. R. "He's In For 2020: Bernie Sanders Is Running For President Again". Vermont Public Radio. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  5. Otterbein, Holly; Siders, David (April 8, 2020). "Bernie Sanders suspends his presidential campaign". Politico. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  6. "Statement of Candidacy by Tulsi Gabbard" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. January 11, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 14, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  7. Kelly, Caroline (January 12, 2019). "Tulsi Gabbard says she will run for president in 2020". CNN. Archived from the original on January 11, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  8. Jason Lalljee; Rebecca Morin (March 19, 2020). "Tulsi Gabbard ends presidential campaign, backs Joe Biden". USA Today. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  9. "Statement of Candidacy by Elizabeth Warren" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 9, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 18, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  10. McCarthy, Tom (February 9, 2019). "Senator Elizabeth Warren officially launches 2020 presidential campaign". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  11. Herndon, Astead W.; Goldmacher, Shane (March 5, 2020). "Elizabeth Warren, Once a Front-Runner, Drops Out of Presidential Race". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  12. "Statement of Candidacy by Michael R Bloomberg" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. November 21, 2019. Retrieved November 23, 2019.
  13. Burns, Alexander (November 24, 2019). "Michael Bloomberg Joins 2020 Democratic Field for President". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 24, 2019.
  14. "Mike Bloomberg drops out of presidential race, endorses Biden". PBS. March 4, 2020.
  15. "Statement of Candidacy by Amy J Klobuchar" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 11, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 15, 2019. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  16. Golshan, Tara (February 10, 2019). "Sen. Amy Klobuchar has won every one of her elections by huge margins. Now she's running for president". Vox. Archived from the original on February 10, 2019. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  17. "Amy Klobuchar ends bid to challenge Trump". BBC. March 2, 2020. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  18. "Statement of Candidacy by Pete Buttigieg" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. April 13, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 14, 2019. Retrieved April 14, 2019.
  19. Karson, Kendall; Gomez, Justin (April 14, 2019). "Pete Buttigieg, little-known mayor turned presidential contender, makes historic bid". ABC News. Archived from the original on April 14, 2019. Retrieved April 14, 2019.
  20. Elena Schneider (March 1, 2020). "Buttigieg drops out of presidential race". Politico. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  21. "FEC Form 2 for Report FEC-1337348". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  22. Saul, Stephanie; Stevens, Matt (February 29, 2020). "Tom Steyer Is Set to Drop Out of 2020 Presidential Race". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  23. Panetta, Grace (March 2020). "Tom Steyer drops out of the 2020 presidential race". Business Insider. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  24. "Statement of Candidacy by Deval Patrick" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. November 14, 2019. Retrieved November 16, 2019. || ||
  25. "Deval Patrick announces 2020 presidential bid". ABC News. November 14, 2019. Retrieved November 14, 2019.
  26. Caitlin Oprysko (February 12, 2020). "Deval Patrick ends longshot presidential bid". Politico. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  27. "Statement of Candidacy by Michael F. Bennet" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. May 5, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 6, 2019. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  28. Gregorian, Dareh. "Colorado Sen. Bennet enters presidential race after prostate cancer treatment". NBC News. Archived from the original on May 2, 2019. Retrieved May 2, 2019.
  29. Ursula Perano (February 11, 2020). "Sen. Michael Bennet ends 2020 presidential campaign". Axios. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  30. Melissa Quinn (March 10, 2020). "Andrew Yang endorses Joe Biden". CBS News. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  31. "Statement of Candidacy by Andrew Yang" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. November 6, 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  32. Roose, Kevin (January 10, 2018). "His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  33. Matthews, Dylan (February 11, 2020). "Andrew Yang suspends his 2020 presidential campaign". Vox. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  34. 34.0 34.1 "2020 Presidential Primary DEMOCRATIC Sample Ballots". Secretary of State of New Hampshire.
  35. "Who's running for office in Arkansas this year?".
  36. "Statement of Candidacy by John K Delaney" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. August 10, 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 20, 2017. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  37. Delaney, John (July 28, 2017). "John Delaney: Why I'm running for president". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 28, 2017. Retrieved July 28, 2017.
  38. Amy B, Wang. "John Delaney says he's dropping out of presidential race". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  39. "Statement of Candidacy by Cory A Booker" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. February 1, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  40. Korecki, Natasha (February 1, 2019). "Cory Booker launches bid for president". Politico. Archived from the original on February 1, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  41. "Author Marianne Williamson Announces Presidential Candidacy". NBC. January 29, 2019. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  42. Medina, Jennifer; Stevens, Matt (January 2, 2020). "Julián Castro Ends Presidential Run: 'It Simply Isn't Our Time'". The New York Times.
  43. Harris, Kamala [@@KamalaHarris] (March 8, 2020). ".@JoeBiden has served our country with dignity and we need him now more than ever. I will do everything in my power to help elect him the next President of the United States" (Tweet). Retrieved March 8, 2020 – via Twitter.
  44. "Statement of Candidacy by Kamala D Harris" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. January 21, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 23, 2019. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  45. Kelsey, Adam (January 21, 2019). "Sen. Kamala Harris announces she will run for president in 2020". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  46. Cadelago, Christopher (December 3, 2019). "Kamala Harris drops out of presidential race". Politico. Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  47. "Statement of Candidacy by Steve Bullock" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. May 14, 2019.
  48. Steve Bullock [@GovernorBullock] (May 14, 2019). "To give everyone a fair shot, we must do more than defeat Donald Trump. We have to defeat the corrupt system that keeps people like him in power, and we need a fighter who's done it before. That's why I'm running for President. Join our team: stevebullock.com" (Tweet). Retrieved May 14, 2019 – via Twitter.
  49. Weigel, David. "Montana Gov. Steve Bullock drops out of presidential race". Washington Post. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  50. Montellaro, Zach. "Race to the finish in New Hampshire". POLITICO. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  51. "Statement of Candidacy by Joe Sestak" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. July 1, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 6, 2019. Retrieved July 6, 2019.
  52. Olson, Laura (June 23, 2019). "Former Pennsylvania Congressman Joe Sestak announces presidential bid". The Morning Call. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  53. Perano, Ursala (December 1, 2019). "Democrat Joe Sestak drops out of 2020 presidential race". Axios. Retrieved December 1, 2019.
  54. "Statement of Candidacy by Wayne Martin Messam" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. March 15, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 16, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  55. Merica, Dan (March 28, 2019). "Florida Mayor Wayne Messam announces 2020 presidential bid". CNN. Archived from the original on March 28, 2019. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  56. Sean Collins (November 20, 2019). "Wayne Messam, who called on Americans to #BeGreat, suspends his presidential bid". Vox. Retrieved November 20, 2019.
  57. "Statement of Candidacy by Robert Beto O'Rourke" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. March 14, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  58. Bradner, Eric; Santiago, Leyla (March 14, 2019). "Beto O'Rourke announces he's running for president in 2020". CNN. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  59. BBC (November 1, 2019). "Democrat Beto O'Rourke ends presidential bid". BBC. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  60. Quint Forgey (November 13, 2019). "Rep. Tim Ryan endorses Biden in Democratic primary - POLITICO". Politico. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  61. "Statement of Candidacy by Timothy J Ryan" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. April 11, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved April 13, 2019.
  62. Vitali, Ali (April 4, 2019). "Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan throws his name into growing 2020 field". NBC News. Archived from the original on April 4, 2019. Retrieved April 4, 2019.
  63. Merica, Dan (October 24, 2019). "Tim Ryan ends 2020 presidential campaign". CNN.
  64. Mays, Jeffrey; Astor, Maggie (February 14, 2020). "Bill de Blasio Endorses Bernie Sanders". The New York Times. Retrieved February 14, 2020.
  65. "Statement of Candidacy by Bill de Blasio" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. May 16, 2019.
  66. Sally Goldenberg (May 16, 2019). "New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio enters crowded Democratic 2020 field". Politico. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  67. Goldenberg, Sally; Forgey, Quint (September 20, 2019). "Bill de Blasio ends 2020 presidential campaign". Politico. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  68. "Statement of Candidacy by Kirsten Gillibrand" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. March 17, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 29, 2019. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  69. Stracqualursi, Veronica. "Kirsten Gillibrand officially jumps into 2020 race, teases speech at Trump hotel in New York". CNN. Archived from the original on March 17, 2019. Retrieved March 17, 2019.
  70. Burns, Alexander (August 28, 2019). "Kirsten Gillibrand Drops Out of Democratic Presidential Race". The New York Times. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  71. "Seth Moulton Drops Out Of The Race For President". WBZ-TV. August 23, 2019. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  72. "Statement of Candidacy by Seth Moulton" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. May 7, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 8, 2019. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  73. Seitz-Wald, Alex (April 22, 2019). "Rep. Seth Moulton is latest Democrat to enter 2020 field". NBC News. Archived from the original on April 22, 2019. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  74. Allen, Jonathon (August 23, 2019). "Seth Moulton ends presidential campaign". NBC News. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  75. @JayInslee (August 22, 2019). "That's why, today, I'm announcing my intention to run for a third term as Washington's governor. Join me" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  76. @JoeBiden (April 22, 2019). "Folks, we just launched a special #EarthDay episode of Here's the Deal! Governor @JayInslee joins me for a discussion on COVID-19, climate change, and why he's supporting our campaign. Listen to the full episode now: JoeBiden.com/Heres-The-Deal" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  77. "Statement of Candidacy by Jay R Inslee" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. March 1, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  78. Dan Merica (March 1, 2019). "Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announces 2020 presidential bid". CNN. Archived from the original on March 3, 2019. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  79. Dareh Gregorian (August 21, 2019). "Jay Inslee drops out of the 2020 presidential race". NBC News. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  80. Garcia, Justin (August 21, 2019). "John Hickenlooper is running for U.S. Senate: "I'm not done fighting for the people of Colorado"". The Denver Post. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  81. "Statement of Candidacy by John W Hickenlooper" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. March 4, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  82. Hickenlooper, John [@Hickenlooper] (August 15, 2019). "This morning, I'm announcing that I'm no longer running for President. While this campaign didn't have the outcome we were hoping for, every moment has been worthwhile & I'm thankful to everyone who supported this campaign and our entire team. bit.ly/2TzVKbS" (Tweet). Retrieved August 15, 2019 – via Twitter.
  83. "Democrat Hickenlooper drops out of 2020 presidential race". UPI. August 15, 2019. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  84. "Statement of Candidacy by Maurice Robert Gravel" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. April 2, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 3, 2019. Retrieved April 3, 2019.
  85. Stuart, Tessa (April 8, 2019). "The Teens Have Officially Convinced Mike Gravel to Run for President". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on April 8, 2019. Retrieved April 8, 2019.
  86. Shen-Berro, Julian (August 7, 2019). "Ex-Alaska Sen. Mike Gravel Ends Unorthodox 2020 Campaign, Endorses Bernie Sanders And Tulsi Gabbard". HuffPost. Retrieved January 21, 2020.
  87. Pramuk, Jacob (July 8, 2019). "Democrat Eric Swalwell drops out of 2020 presidential race, becoming first prominent Democrat to do so". Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  88. Solender, Andrew [@AndrewSolender] (April 12, 2020). "I'm not 100% sure but I think this is actually the first time @ericswalwell has publicly endorsed @JoeBiden. And it happened... on a cartoon."" (Tweet). Retrieved April 14, 2020 – via Twitter.
  89. "Statement of Candidacy by Eric Michael Swalwell" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. April 8, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  90. Tolan, Casey (April 8, 2019). "Eric Swalwell jumps into presidential race with long-shot White House bid". The Mercury News. Archived from the original on April 8, 2019. Retrieved April 8, 2019.
  91. Hudak, Zak (July 8, 2019). "Democrat Eric Swalwell drops out of presidential race". CBS News.
  92. Pathe, Simone (January 13, 2020). "West Virginia's Richard Ojeda is back, this time running for Senate". Roll Call. Retrieved January 13, 2020.
  93. "Statement of Candidacy by Richard Neece Ojeda II" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. November 11, 2018. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 26, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  94. Grim, Ryan (November 11, 2018). "Richard Ojeda, West Virginia Lawmaker Who Backed Teachers Strikes, Will Run for President". The Intercept. Archived from the original on December 19, 2018. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  95. Grim, Ryan (January 25, 2019). "Richard Ojeda Drops Out of Presidential Race". The Intercept. Archived from the original on January 25, 2019. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  96. "Statement of Candidacy by Harry William Braun III" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. December 5, 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 23, 2017. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  97. "Harry Braun for President". Harry Braun for President Committee 2020. Archived from the original on May 8, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  98. "Statement of Candidacy by Ami Horowitz" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. May 2, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 9, 2019. Retrieved May 9, 2019.
  99. Tal Axelrod (May 8, 2019). "Right-wing documentary filmmaker enters Dem presidential race". The Hill. Archived from the original on May 8, 2019. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  100. @amihorowitz (May 8, 2019). "🚨 2020 ANNOUNCEMENT 🚨 I'm running for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination because all their current candidates are insane. If 65,000 people donate $1, I will be onstage at next month's #DemDebate and say that to their face. Donate at AmiForAmerica.org" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  101. Ami for America (July 31, 2019). "FEC Form 3P: Report of Receipts and Disbursements" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  102. "2020 New Hampshire Presidential Primary Filing Period". New Hampshire Secretary of State. Retrieved November 24, 2019.
  103. "Statement of Candidacy by Kenneth E. Nwadike Jr" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. October 18, 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 1, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  104. "About Ken E. Nwadike, Jr". Kenny 2020. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  105. Gamard, Sarah (October 1, 2019). "Scott Walker, Democrat again, to wield his homemade signs against Chris Coons for Senate". USA Today.
  106. Herndon, Astead W. (August 13, 2019). "Stacey Abrams Will Not Run for President in 2020, Focusing Instead on Fighting Voter Suppression". The New York Times. Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  107. Mangan, Dan (December 4, 2018). "Michael Avenatti announces he will not run for president in 2020". CNBC. Archived from the original on December 4, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  108. Jessica Chasmar (April 25, 2019). "Former Stormy Daniels attorney Michael Avenatti backs Biden: 'He has my enthusiastic support'". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on April 26, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  109. Levitz, Eric (February 4, 2019). "The Democratic Party's Most 'Electable' 2020 Candidate Isn't Running". New York Magazine. Archived from the original on March 1, 2019. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  110. Jensen, Tom (August 23, 2017). "Trump Holds Steady After Charlottesville; Supporters Think Whites, Christians Face Discrimination" (PDF). Public Policy Polling. Retrieved August 23, 2017.
  111. Richards, Sam (March 30, 2017). "Jerry Brown for president? 'Don't rule it out!'". Contra Costa Times. Archived from the original on May 10, 2017. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  112. Steinmetz, Katy (September 9, 2017). "The Philosopher King". Time. Archived from the original on November 10, 2017. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  113. @costareports (October 22, 2019). "Sen. @SherrodBrown tells reporters that he's ruling out a 2020 bid (again), following @jmartNYT report that some Dems are eyeing him as a late entry. "None," he replies, when asked about possibility he gets in. Adds that he doesn't have the "burning desire" to be president" (Tweet). Retrieved October 22, 2019 – via Twitter.
  114. Kilgore, Ed (August 2, 2017). "Democrats Could Have a 2020 Presidential Field As Large As an Iowa Cornfield". Daily Intelligencer. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  115. Sweeny, Chuck (October 11, 2017). "Chuck Sweeny: Bustos stumping in Iowa: Is she running for president?". Rockford Register Star. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  116. Laura Olson (November 26, 2018). "Bob Casey stokes speculation for a presidential run in 2020". The Morning Call. Archived from the original on January 27, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  117. "Casey Ends Consideration of a Presidential Run in 2020". U.S. News & World Report. January 18, 2019. Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  118. Saenz, Arlette (April 25, 2019). "Joe Biden announces he is running for president in 2020". CNN. Archived from the original on April 25, 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  119. Gregg, Katherine (February 21, 2017). "Lincoln Chafee defends Trump, criticizes Raimondo and does not rule out return to politics". The Providence Journal. Retrieved February 26, 2017.
  120. "Former Democratic presidential candidate blasts media for 'onslaught' on Trump". Business Insider. February 21, 2017. Retrieved February 26, 2017.
  121. Granahan, Tara (February 21, 2017). "LISTEN: Former Governor Chafee: Running again?". WPRI-TV. Retrieved March 9, 2017.
  122. Zurko, Roz (March 26, 2017). "IS HILLARY GROOMING CHELSEA CLINTON FOR WHITE HOUSE IN 2020 – CHELSEA VS TRUMP? [OPINION]". Inquisitr. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
  123. "No, Chelsea Clinton is not running for office ... 'right now'". KNXV-TV. March 29, 2017. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
  124. Lejeune, Tristan (November 12, 2019). "Hillary Clinton says she faces 'enormous pressure' on 2020, but it's 'not in my plans'". The Hill.
  125. Paget, Antonia (November 9, 2016). "Not happy with Trump as POTUS? There could be another celebrity candidate on the cards". Daily Express. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  126. Parker, Mike (February 12, 2017). "George Clooney is preparing for his biggest role yet: 2020 US elections". Daily Express. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  127. Wilstein, Matt (February 24, 2017). "George Clooney Gets Political at César Awards: Trump Gives 'Comfort to Our Enemies'". The Daily Beast. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  128. Menegus, Bryan (June 15, 2017). "So Uh, Is Tim Cook Running for President, Too?". Gizmodo. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  129. Hardy, Kevin (August 25, 2017). "Apple CEO Tim Cook for president? Here's what he says". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  130. Blake, Meredith (June 24, 2017). "Stephen Colbert announces on Russian TV he's considering running for president in 2020". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 25, 2017.
  131. Wang, Amy B. (June 24, 2017). "Stephen Colbert went to Russia to 'announce' his 2020 run for president". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 25, 2017.
  132. Kreps, Daniel (June 24, 2017). "Stephen Colbert Teases 2020 Presidential Run on Russian TV". Rolling Stone. Retrieved June 25, 2017.
  133. Dovere, Edward-Isaac (July 18, 2017). "Can Roy Cooper Show Democrats How to Win Again?". Politico. Archived from the original on July 28, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  134. Moody, Aaron; Specht, Paul A. (March 29, 2018). "Roy Cooper for president? 'I'm sure I'll get some calls.'". The News & Observer. Archived from the original on July 5, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  135. @RoyCooperNC (December 5, 2019). "I've officially filed for re-election! Together, we've made real progress, but there is more work to be done. If you're with me, sign up to join our team → act.roycooper.com/join-our-team" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  136. Smith, Allan (February 13, 2017). "Mark Cuban offers cryptic response when asked if he's considering future presidential bid". Business Insider. Retrieved February 25, 2017.
  137. Smith, Allan (February 23, 2017). "Poll shows Mark Cuban in surprisingly competitive position against Trump in prospective 2020 race". Business Insider. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  138. "Mark Cuban ruling out 2020 presidential run....for now". Sports Illustrated. March 16, 2017. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  139. "New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Will Not Run for President in 2020". Governing. New York Daily News. November 28, 2018. Archived from the original on April 21, 2019. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  140. Klepper, David (January 4, 2018). "New York governor's DC attacks prompt 2020 speculation". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018.
  141. Hermani, Jordyn (April 30, 2019). "Cuomo says Biden 'can actually get something done' if he wins". Politico. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  142. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  143. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  144. Hayward, Steven (July 18, 2017). "JAMIE DIMON FOR PRESIDENT?". Power Line. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  145. Dunkley, Emma (August 3, 2017). "Jamie Dimon could harbour political ambitions". Financial Times. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  146. Mikells, Bruce (November 22, 2016). "Louisiana Governor To Run For President?". KMDL. Retrieved November 27, 2016.
  147. Jones, Michael (February 19, 2017). "President John Bel Edwards (D-LA)". HuffPost. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  148. Montellaro, Zach (November 30, 2018). "Mayor Rahm's 2020 strategy for Democrats". Politico. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  149. Fearnow, Benjamin (September 4, 2018). "Why Isn't Rahm Emanuel Running for Chicago Mayor Again?". Newsweek. Archived from the original on September 5, 2018. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  150. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  151. Molloy, Tim (November 29, 2016). "Sen. Al Franken Won't Run for President in 2020 (Exclusive)". TheWrap. Archived from the original on September 12, 2017. Retrieved September 6, 2017.
  152. Siders, David; Cadelago, Christopher; Strauss, Daniel. "Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will not run for president". Politico. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  153. Ed O'Keefe (November 29, 2018). "L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti closer to 2020 bid—race will be about "getting s*** done"". CBS News. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  154. Michael Finnegan; Seema Mehta (January 9, 2020). "Eric Garcetti endorses Joe Biden for president as candidate visits Southern California". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 10, 2020.
  155. W. Herndon, Astead (March 20, 2019). "'Florida Is Tired of Being a Cheap Date': Andrew Gillum Wants to Help Democrats Win in 2020". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  156. Mindock, Clark (July 20, 2017). "Al Gore's new climate change film raises huge question: Will he run again in 2020?". The Independent. Archived from the original on July 23, 2017. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  157. "Here's why Al Gore is done with politics". NowThis News. August 2, 2017. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved August 4, 2017.
  158. Korecki, Natasha (November 29, 2017). "Gutiérrez eyes 2020 presidential run". Politico. Archived from the original on November 30, 2017. Retrieved November 30, 2017.
  159. Preston, Mark (May 10, 2018). "Rep. Gutierrez passes on presidential bid, will focus on mobilizing Latino voters". CNN. Archived from the original on May 15, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  160. Devan Cole. "Eric Holder says he will not run for president in 2020". CNN.
  161. "Holder to audit Israel facial recognition firm AnyVision for Microsoft". NBC News.
  162. Hume, Ashley (October 3, 2019). "Oprah Winfrey, Jennifer Garner Push for Bob Iger Presidential Run". Variety.
  163. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  164. http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/12/maybe_doug_jones_should_run_for_president.html
  165. https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/12/20/how-to-beat-trump-2020-elections-generic-democrat-216121
  166. Rozsa, Matthew (November 16, 2017). "Tim Kaine wants to eliminate superdelegates". Salon. Archived from the original on December 4, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  167. Hagen, Lisa (November 17, 2016). "Kaine rules out run for president in 2020". The Hill. Archived from the original on November 27, 2016. Retrieved November 17, 2016.
  168. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/sen-tim-kaine-endorses-joe-biden-before-key-primary-elections/2020/02/28/c380348a-57eb-11ea-9b35-def5a027d470_story.html
  169. Kraske, Steve (November 30, 2016). "Look where Jason Kander is going". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved December 12, 2016.
  170. Palermo, Gregg (November 30, 2016). "Missouri Secretary of State's travel itinerary raises eyebrows". KTVI. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  171. Guttman, Nathan (December 1, 2016). "Is Jason Kander Dreaming of Being Your First Jewish President?". The Forward. Retrieved December 2, 2016.
  172. Fassett, Athena (September 23, 2019). "Could John Kasich emerge as Democrats' dark-horse candidate for president?".
  173. @@JohnKasich (April 24, 2019). "I've known @JoeBiden for many years and while I don't agree with all of his policy ideas, my old friend will be a formidable candidate" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  174. "Caroline Kennedy's possible political future". AOL. January 23, 2017. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  175. Mulraney, Frances (January 25, 2017). "Could Caroline Kennedy be the next Hillary Clinton and run for president?". IrishCentral. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  176. Oppenheimer, Jerry (January 22, 2017). "Could Caroline Kennedy be the baggage-free Hillary Clinton?". New York Post. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  177. Caygle, Heather (September 3, 2017). "The next Kennedy weighs his next move". Politico. Archived from the original on December 15, 2017. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  178. Spitalniak, Laura (February 7, 2019). "Rep. Joe Kennedy III rules out 2020 bid, but encourages 'big, broad field'". ABC News. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  179. "Congressman Joe Kennedy III announces U.S. Senate run". Boston25 News. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019.
  180. Warren, Elizabeth [@ewarren] (February 9, 2019). ""I am so thrilled to help introduce the next President of the United States—Elizabeth Warren!" —Rep. @JoeKennedy #Warren2020" (Tweet). Retrieved February 9, 2019 – via Twitter.
  181. Morin, Rebecca (November 28, 2018). "John Kerry not ruling out 2020 bid for president". Politico. Archived from the original on February 10, 2019. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  182. Stephen Murphy (June 10, 2019). "John Kerry rules himself out of 2020 US presidential race". Sky News. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  183. Dan Balz (December 5, 2019). "John F. Kerry endorses Joe Biden, as the former vice president seeks a boost for his candidacy". Washington Post. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  184. Blow, Charles M. (November 25, 2018). "Will Mitch Run?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 28, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  185. Grace, Stephanie (November 26, 2018). "Stephanie Grace: As 2020 field starts to develop, Mitch Landrieu waits—and watches". The Advocate (Louisiana). Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  186. Axelrod, Tal (February 6, 2019). "Mitch Landrieu on 2020 run: 'I don't think I'm going to do it'". The Hill. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  187. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  188. Merica, Dan (March 27, 2019). "Terry McAuliffe leaning toward jumping into 2020 race". CNN. Archived from the original on March 28, 2019. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  189. Matthew Choi. "Terry McAuliffe won't run for president". Politico. Archived from the original on April 18, 2019. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  190. Former Governor Terry McAuliffe makes the case for Joe Biden, MSNBC
  191. Wheeler, David R. (August 20, 2018). "McRaven for president in 2020". CNN.
  192. Foster, Caitlin (August 24, 2018). "After his op-ed slamming Trump, the Navy SEAL who oversaw the Bin Laden raid is being eyed as a political contender for 2020". Business Insider. Retrieved October 24, 2018.
  193. Hennessey, Susan; Fogel, Mikhaila (August 18, 2018). "An Admiral Speaks Out". The Atlantic.
  194. Sullivan, Sean. "Sen. Jeff Merkley opts out of Democratic presidential contest and will run for reelection to Oregon seat". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  195. Seitz-Wald, Alex (September 18, 2018). "Eyeing 2020, Jeff Merkley hires up in Iowa and New Hampshire". NBC News. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  196. Sullivan, Sean (March 5, 2019). "Sen. Jeff Merkley opts out of Democratic presidential contest and will run for reelection to Oregon seat". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  197. Prakash, Nidhi (December 12, 2018). "Sen. Chris Murphy Said He Is "Not Planning" To Run For President, But Wouldn't Explicitly Rule It Out". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  198. Krasselt, Kaitlyn (January 24, 2019). "Murphy '100 percent' not running for president". Connecticut Post. Archived from the original on January 25, 2019. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  199. Brodesser-Akner, Claude (July 5, 2018). "Is Phil Murphy already running for president? Experts say take a look at the signs". NJ.com. Archived from the original on July 5, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  200. Murphy, Phil [@PhilMurphyNJ] (February 1, 2019). "Cory Booker ran toward the toughest problems and has fought to build a more just and fair nation for everyone, from his days on the Newark City Council, as mayor, and as a U.S. Senator. He'll make an amazing President" (Tweet). Retrieved February 1, 2019 – via Twitter.
  201. Boggioni, Tom (March 18, 2017). "'I got a guy': Bill Maher predicts 2020 Democratic presidential candidate if they don't 'f*ck it up'". The Raw Story. Archived from the original on August 14, 2017. Retrieved August 13, 2017.
  202. Debenedetti, Gabriel (October 25, 2018). "Gavin Newsom Has More Important Things to Do Than Run for President". New York. Archived from the original on October 25, 2018. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  203. Cadelago, Christopher (February 15, 2019). "Gavin Newsom endorses Kamala Harris for president". Politico. Archived from the original on February 16, 2019. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  204. Conway, Madeline (January 23, 2017). "For mourning Democrats, Michelle Obama offers hope". Politico. Archived from the original on February 2, 2019. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  205. Earl, Jennifer (November 10, 2016). "Michelle Obama responds to someone asking her to run for president in 2020". CBS News. Archived from the original on March 18, 2017. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  206. Melissa Quinn (April 3, 2018). "Martin O'Malley keeping an 'open heart and open mind' about running for president in 2020". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  207. @MartinOMalley (January 3, 2019). "I will not be running for President in 2020" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  208. Dan Merica (January 3, 2019). "Martin O'Malley rules out 2020 bid, urges Beto O'Rourke to run". CNN. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  209. "Maryland Reps. Ruppersberger, Trone endorse Biden; Rawlings-Blake, Brown also switch to former vice president". BaltimoreSun.com. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  210. Frank Bruni (January 26, 2019). "The Loneliness of the Moderate Democrat". New York Times. Retrieved January 7, 2020.
  211. Michelle R. Smith (February 5, 2020). "Rhode Island governor backs Michael Bloomberg for president". Associated Press. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  212. Daniel Keith (March 4, 2020). "Governor Raimondo endorses Joe Biden". Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  213. Dovere, Edward-Isaac (March 29, 2019). "Joe Sanberg Dares Trump to Call Him a Socialist". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on March 29, 2019. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  214. Sanberg, Joe [@JosephNSanberg] (June 1, 2019). "1/ Moments ago at the CA Democratic Party state convention, I announced that I will not run for President of the United States in 2020. I gave the question a lot of consideration because I believe our next President must make Ending Poverty the governing agenda of our nation" (Tweet). Retrieved June 2, 2019 – via Twitter.
  215. Marans, Daniel (February 29, 2020). "Progressive Entrepreneur Joe Sanberg Endorses Bernie Sanders For President". HuffPost.
  216. Levine, Jon (July 24, 2017). "President Scarborough? New Interview Says Joe 'Didn't Rule Out' Interest In White House Run". Mediaite. Archived from the original on August 22, 2017. Retrieved August 21, 2017.
  217. Nuzzi, Olivia (July 23, 2017). "Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski, & Trump: A Love Story". New York. Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  218. Alison King; Karla Rendon-Alvarez (February 4, 2019). "U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff Says He's Not Running for President During NH Stop". NECN. Archived from the original on February 4, 2019. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  219. 219.0 219.1 "California 2020 Federal Candidate List" (PDF).
  220. Dovere, Edward-Isaac (January 26, 2019). "Ex-Starbucks CEO Could Get Trump Re-elected". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  221. Forgey, Quint (September 6, 2019). "Howard Schultz announces he will not run for president". Politico. Retrieved September 6, 2019.
  222. Drake, Phil (December 3, 2018). "Tester says he won't run for president". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  223. Camilo Montoya-Galvez (June 9, 2019). "Jon Tester endorses fellow Montana Democrat Steve Bullock for president". Face the Nation. Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  224. Hagan, Lisa (November 30, 2016). "Virginia Dem senator shuts door on 2020 presidential run". The Hill.
  225. Estepa, Jessica (August 4, 2017). "Rep. Maxine Waters says she isn't running for president". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 21, 2018. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  226. Hagan, Lisa (May 5, 2017). "The 43 people who might run against Trump in 2020". The Hill.
  227. Jensen, Tom (October 31, 2017). "Support For Impeachment At Record High" (PDF). Public Policy Polling. Retrieved October 31, 2017.
  228. Oppenheim, Maya (March 3, 2017). "Oprah Winfrey considers 2020 Presidential run in wake of Donald Trump's win". The Independent. Archived from the original on March 14, 2017. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  229. "Oprah Winfrey: I don't want to run for US president". BBC. November 1, 2018. Archived from the original on November 3, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  230. Carberry, Maegan (March 12, 2017). "We picked the wrong billionaire: The case for Mark Zuckerberg 2020". Salon. Archived from the original on March 14, 2017. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  231. Kantrowitz, Alex; Tiku, Nitasha (January 24, 2017). "Mark Zuckerberg says he's not running for president". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 25, 2017. Retrieved January 25, 2017.

Template:2020 Democratic primaries

Visibility[edit source | edit]

This page has been added to search engine indexes. learn more