You should: Sign up > Write articles > tell people about your articles > Monetize them > Earn money  > learn/do/earn more

2020 Democratic Party presidential debates

From Wikiafripedia, the free afripedia (encyclopedia)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Template:US 2020 presidential elections series

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential debates took place among candidates in the campaign for the Democratic Party's nomination for the president of the United States in the 2020 presidential election.

There were a total of 29 major Democratic candidates. Of these, 23 candidates participated in at least one debate. Only Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders participated in all the debates; only Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, and Elizabeth Warren participated in all but one debate.

Overview[edit source | edit]

Schedule[edit source | edit]

In December 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced the preliminary schedule for 12 official DNC-sanctioned debates, set to begin in June 2019, with six debates in 2019 and the remaining six during the first four months of 2020. Candidates are allowed to participate in forums featuring multiple other candidates as long as only one candidate appears on stage at a time; if candidates participate in any unsanctioned debate with other presidential candidates, they will lose their invitation to the next DNC-sanctioned debate.[1][2]

The DNC also announced that it would not partner with Fox News as a media sponsor for any debates.[3][4] Fox News had last held a Democratic debate in 2003.[5] All media sponsors selected to host a debate will as a new rule be required to appoint at least one female moderator for each debate, to ensure there will not be a gender-skewed treatment of the candidates and debate topics.[6]

Debate schedule
Debate Date Time
(ET)
Viewers Location Sponsor(s) Moderator(s)
1A June 26, 2019 9–11 p.m. ~24.3 million
(15.3m live TV; 9m streaming)[7]
Arsht Center,
Miami, Florida[8]
NBC News
MSNBC
Telemundo
Jose Diaz-Balart
Savannah Guthrie
Lester Holt
Rachel Maddow
Chuck Todd[9]
1B June 27, 2019 9–11 p.m. ~27.1 million
(18.1m live TV; 9m streaming)[10]
2A July 30, 2019 8–10:30 p.m. ~11.5 million
(8.7m live TV; 2.8m streaming)
Fox Theatre,
Detroit, Michigan[11]
CNN Dana Bash
Don Lemon
Jake Tapper[12]
2B July 31, 2019[13] 8–10:30 p.m. ~13.8 million
(10.7m live TV; 3.1m streaming)[14]
3 September 12, 2019 8–11 p.m. 14.04 million live TV[15] Health and Physical Education Arena,
Texas Southern University,
Houston, Texas[16]
ABC News
Univision
Linsey Davis
David Muir
Jorge Ramos
George Stephanopoulos[17]
4 October 15, 2019[18] 8–11 p.m. ~8.8 million
(8.34m live TV; 0.45m streaming)[19]
Rike Physical Education Center,
Otterbein University,
Westerville, Ohio
CNN
The New York Times[20]
Erin Burnett
Anderson Cooper
Marc Lacey[21]
5 November 20, 2019[22] 9–11 p.m. ~7.9 million
(6.6m live TV; 1.3m streaming)[23]
Oprah Winfrey sound stage,
Tyler Perry Studios,
Atlanta, Georgia[24]
MSNBC
The Washington Post
Rachel Maddow
Andrea Mitchell
Ashley Parker
Kristen Welker[25]
6 December 19, 2019 8–11 p.m.[26] ~14.6 million
(6.17m live TV; 8.4m streaming)[27]
Gersten Pavilion,
Loyola Marymount University,
Los Angeles, California[28]
PBS
Politico
Tim Alberta
Yamiche Alcindor
Amna Nawaz
Judy Woodruff[29]
7 January 14, 2020 9–11:15 p.m.[30] ~11.3 million
(7.3m live TV; 4.0m streaming)[31]
Sheslow Auditorium,
Drake University,
Des Moines, Iowa[32][33]
CNN
The Des Moines Register
Wolf Blitzer
Brianne Pfannenstiel
Abby Phillip[34]
8 February 7, 2020 8–10:30 p.m.[35] ~11.0 million
(7.8m live TV; 3.2m streaming)[36]
Thomas F. Sullivan Arena,
Saint Anselm College,
Manchester, New Hampshire[32][37]
ABC News
WMUR-TV
Apple News
Linsey Davis
Monica Hernandez
David Muir
Adam Sexton
George Stephanopoulos[35]
9 February 19, 2020 9–11 p.m.[38] ~33.16 million
(19.66m live TV; 13.5m streaming)[39][40][41]
Le Théâtre des Arts,
Paris Las Vegas,
Paradise, Nevada[38]
NBC News
MSNBC
Telemundo
The Nevada Independent
Vanessa Hauc
Lester Holt
Hallie Jackson
Jon Ralston
Chuck Todd[38]
10 February 25, 2020 8–10 p.m.[42] ~30.4 million
(15.3m live TV; 15.1m streaming)[43]
Gaillard Center,
Charleston, South Carolina[32]
CBS News
BET
Twitter
Congressional Black Caucus Institute[44]
Margaret Brennan
Major Garrett
Gayle King
Norah O'Donnell
Bill Whitaker[44]
11 March 15, 2020 8–10 p.m.[45] ~11.4 million
(10.8m live TV; 0.6m streaming)[46]
CNN studio
Washington, D.C.[47]
CNN
Univision
Congressional Hispanic Caucus BOLD
Dana Bash
Ilia Calderón
Jake Tapper[47]

Participation[edit source | edit]

The following is a table of participating candidates in each debate:

Participating candidates in the DNC-sanctioned debates[48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56]
Candidate

 P  Present  A  Absent  I  Invited  N  Not invited  Out  Not yet entered race  W  Withdrawn

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Joe Biden P P P P P P P P P P P
Bernie Sanders P P P P P P P P P P P
Tulsi Gabbard P P N P P N N N N N N
Elizabeth Warren P P P P P P P P P P W
Michael Bloomberg Out N N N P P W
Amy Klobuchar P P P P P P P P P P W
Pete Buttigieg P P P P P P P P P P W
Tom Steyer Out N N P P P P P N P W
Deval Patrick Out N N N W
Michael Bennet P P N N N N N N W
Andrew Yang P P P P P P N P W
John Delaney P P N N N N N W
Cory Booker P P P P P N N W
Marianne Williamson P P N N N N W
Julián Castro P P P P N N W
Kamala Harris P P P P P W
Steve Bullock N P N N N W
Joe Sestak Out N N N N W
Wayne Messam N N N N N W
Beto O'Rourke P P P P W
Tim Ryan P P N N W
Bill de Blasio P P N W
Kirsten Gillibrand P P W
Seth Moulton N N W
Jay Inslee P P W
John Hickenlooper P P W
Mike Gravel N N W
Eric Swalwell P W
Richard Ojeda W

Debates in 2019[edit source | edit]

First debates (June 26–27, 2019)[edit source | edit]

Qualification[edit source | edit]

To qualify for the first debates, entrants had to, at a minimum, achieve one of the two criteria listed. If this had resulted in more than 20 qualified candidates, the two criteria would have been evaluated in combination per an outlined set of tiebreaking rules, but since 20 candidates qualified, no tiebreaker was necessary.[57] The deadline for candidates to meet either of the below criteria was June 12.[58][59]

Summary[edit source | edit]

Template:Infobox debate

External video
NBC News / MSNBC
Democratic Debate,
Miami, Florida,
June 26, 2019
June 27, 2019
June 26 Live Stream Recording,
NBC News via YouTube[87]
June 27 Live Stream Recording,
NBC News via YouTube[88]

The Democratic Party's first presidential debates ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential election were held in two groups on June 26 and 27, 2019, in Miami, Florida.

Starting at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, they aired on NBC and were broadcast on radio by Westwood One. Lester Holt was the lead moderator of the debates, joined by Savannah Guthrie, Chuck Todd, Rachel Maddow, and Jose Diaz-Balart.

The DNC drew lots among the 20 qualified candidates for the first debate to determine whether they should debate on the first night (June 26) or second night (June 27) at the NBC News headquarters (30 Rockefeller Plaza) in New York City on June 14. The qualified candidates or their representatives were present and involved at the drawing event,[89] which was not televised.[90]

The debates took place at the Arsht Center in Miami, Florida. The first night of the debate was marked by a noted dust-up between O'Rourke and Castro on the subject of immigration, which Castro was widely perceived to have won, while Warren met expectations as a top-tier candidate. In addition, Booker and Klobuchar each had their moment in the spotlight, Klobuchar in particular being noted for her one-liners, one of which was about acknowledging that, for the first time in U.S. history, there were at least three women on stage at a presidential debate.[91][92] Gabbard took on Ryan over continuing the US presence in Afghanistan.[93] Booker, Castro, and O'Rourke all spoke Spanish at different times during the debate, which received mixed reception and was met with jokes from second-night competitors Williamson and Yang on Twitter.[94][95] On night two, Harris and Biden clashed over Biden's past comments about working with segregationist senators and his stance on desegregation busing.[96]

Night one candidates
Candidates
drawn for the
June 26 debate
Drawing tier[lower-alpha 1] Polling
criterion
result[66]
Airtime (min.)[97]
Warren 1 16.3% (10 polls) 9.3
O'Rourke 1 10.3% (10 polls) 10.3
Booker 1 4.0% (10 polls) 10.9
Klobuchar 1 3.7% (10 polls) 8.5
Castro 1 2.0% (8 polls) 8.8
Gabbard 2 1.3% (8 polls) 6.6
Ryan 2 1.3% (9 polls) 7.7
Inslee 2 1% (7 polls) 5.0
de Blasio 2 1% (3 polls) 5.6
Delaney 2 1% (3 polls) 6.6
Average 4.2% 7.9
Night two candidates
Candidates
drawn for the
June 27 debate
Drawing tier[lower-alpha 1] Polling
criterion
result[66]
Airtime (min.)[97]
Biden 1 37.7% (10 polls) 13.6
Sanders 1 26.7% (10 polls) 11.0
Buttigieg 1 13% (10 polls) 10.5
Harris 1 11% (10 polls) 11.9
Yang 2 1.7% (10 polls) 3.0
Gillibrand 2 1.3% (6 polls) 7.5
Hickenlooper 2 1.3% (5 polls) 5.2
Bennet 2 1% (3 polls) 8.1
Williamson 2 1%, (4 polls) 5.0
Swalwell 2 1% (3 polls) 4.3
Average 9.6% 8.0

Second debates (July 30–31, 2019)[edit source | edit]

Qualification[edit source | edit]

The criteria for qualifying for the second debates were the same as for the first debates.[98] To qualify for the second debates, debate entrants had to, at minimum, comply with one of the two below listed criteria.[57] Mike Gravel was not invited to the debates since he only met the donor threshold, which was given a lesser weight than the polling threshold.[99] The deadline for candidates to meet either of the below criteria was July 16.[100]

Summary[edit source | edit]

Template:Infobox debate

The Democratic Party's second presidential debates ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential election were held on July 30 and 31, 2019, in Detroit, Michigan.

Starting at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, they aired on CNN and were broadcast on radio by Westwood One. Jake Tapper was the lead moderator of the debates, joined by Dana Bash and Don Lemon.

The drawing of lots among the 20 invited candidates to determine when they will debate was televised in prime time on July 18.[104] There were three tiers of candidates that were split between two nights, as opposed to the two tiers used in the first debates.[105]

In total, 21 candidates qualified for the second debate. The 14 candidates who met both criteria (Biden, Sanders, Warren, Harris, Buttigieg, O'Rourke, Booker, Klobuchar, Castro, Yang, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Inslee, and Williamson) and the six candidates who met the polling criterion only (Ryan, Hickenlooper, Delaney, de Blasio, Bennet, and Bullock) were invited to participate in the debate. Gravel, the one candidate to qualify by the donor criterion only, was not invited because of the 20-candidate limit and the polling criterion's precedence over the donor criterion as mandated by the DNC. The set of participants for the second debate was identical to the first debates with one exception: Bullock replaced Swalwell, who suspended his campaign between the first and second debates.[99]

The debate on July 30 featured Bullock, Buttigieg, Delaney, Hickenlooper, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Ryan, Sanders, Warren and Williamson, while the debate on July 31 featured Bennet, Biden, Booker, Castro, de Blasio, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Harris, Inslee and Yang.[49][106] Both debates took place at the Fox Theatre in Detroit, Michigan.

The overarching theme on the first night was a clash between moderates and progressives on a variety of issues, ranging from Medicare for All to electability.[107] CNN received criticism for allegedly inciting conflicts between candidates and making questions from Republican talking points, as well as enforcing the time limits too strictly.[108] The second night saw significant discussion centered on candidates' differing health care plans. Additionally, Gabbard went on the offensive against Harris.[109][110]

Night one candidates
Candidates
drawn for the
July 30 debate
Drawing tier[lower-alpha 2] Polling
criterion
result[66]
Airtime (min.)[97]
Sanders 1 27% (19 polls) 17.6
Warren 1 19% (19 polls) 17.9
Buttigieg 2 13.3% (19 polls) 14.4
O'Rourke 2 10.3% (18 polls) 10.9
Klobuchar 2 4% (16 polls) 10.7
Hickenlooper 3 1.3% (9 polls) 8.8
Ryan 3 1.3% (9 polls) 9.8
Delaney 3 1.3% (8 polls) 10.3
Williamson 3 1% (8 polls) 8.9
Bullock 3 1% (4 polls) 10.8
Average 8% 12.0
Night two candidates
Candidates
drawn for the
July 31 debate
Drawing tier[lower-alpha 2] Polling
criterion
result[66]
Airtime (min.)[97]
Biden 1 40.7% (19 polls) 21.2
Harris 1 17.7% (19 polls) 17.7
Booker 2 4.3% (19 polls) 12.8
Castro 2 2.7% (12 polls) 10.5
Yang 2 2% (18 polls) 8.7
Gabbard 3 1.3% (12 polls) 10.6
Gillibrand 3 1.3% (10 polls) 11.6
Inslee 3 1% (9 polls) 10.7
Bennet 3 1% (7 polls) 10.6
de Blasio 3 1% (4 polls) 9.7
Average 7.3% 12.4

Participation[edit source | edit]

Each of the first two debates took place during two consecutive nights, with a maximum of 10 candidates per night. The DNC, at a public event before each debate, drew lots among the qualified candidates to determine whether they shall debate on the first or second night.[111][112] This drawing procedure was designed to avoid the appearance of a "kiddie table" debate where the lowest polling candidates were grouped together with no leading candidates, which happened during the 2016 Republican Party presidential debates.[113]

Third debate (September 12, 2019)[edit source | edit]

Qualification[edit source | edit]

The third debate took place at the Health and Physical Education Arena on the campus of Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas. For participation in the third debate, candidates were required to meet both polling and fundraising criteria by August 28 (in comparison to the first and second debates, where only one criterion was necessary). Qualifying polls had to be released between June 28 and August 28.[114] Five candidates (Gravel, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Moulton, and Gillibrand) suspended their campaigns between the second and third debates.

On August 23, the Gabbard campaign criticized the DNC's purported lack of transparency in the process of selecting organizations/institutions to sponsor polls and how better-ranked polls were excluded. The campaign also highlighted the stark reduction in poll frequency, especially in early primary states,[115] after the second debate compared to after the first debate and how they believed that that was "particularly harmful" to candidates with lower name recognition.[116] The campaigns of Marianne Williamson,[117] Tom Steyer,[118] and Michael Bennet[119][120] also requested that the DNC increase the number of certified polls by expanding the list of certified poll sponsoring organizations.

Summary[edit source | edit]

Template:Infobox debate

External video
ABC News/Univision Democratic Debate,
Houston, Texas, September 12, 2019
Live Stream Recording,
ABC News via YouTube[138]
Live Stream Recording,
Univision via YouTube[139]

The Democratic Party's third presidential debate ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential election took place on September 12, 2019 in Houston, Texas.

It aired on ABC News and Univision. George Stephanopoulos was the lead moderator of the debate, joined by David Muir, Linsey Davis, and Jorge Ramos.[140]

The candidates who qualified for the third debate were Biden, Booker, Buttigieg, Castro, Harris, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Sanders, Warren, and Yang.[50]

Candidates Airtime (min.)[141]
Biden 17.4
Warren 16.5
Booker 14.7
Sanders 14.1
Harris 13.7
Buttigieg 11.4
Castro 11.0
Klobuchar 10.4
O'Rourke 9.3
Yang 7.9
Average 12.6

Fourth debate (October 15, 2019)[edit source | edit]

Qualification[edit source | edit]

A memo released by the DNC on August 5 indicated that the qualification period for the fourth debate in October started on June 28, which was the same day that qualification began for the third debate (in effect allowing all candidates who qualified for the third debate to automatically qualify for the fourth debate). This gave candidates who did not qualify for the September debate more time to qualify for the October debate.[142] Biden, Booker, Buttigieg, Castro, Harris, Klobuchar, O'Rourke, Sanders, Warren, and Yang qualified before August 22,[143] while Steyer and Gabbard qualified on September 8[144] and September 24 respectively.[145] The qualification deadline for the fourth debate was October 1, 2019.[146] One candidate (de Blasio) suspended his campaign between the third and fourth debates.[147]

Summary[edit source | edit]

Template:Infobox debate

External video
CNN
The New York Times
Democratic Debate,
Westerville, Ohio
October 15, 2019
CNN Replay,
CNN via Facebook[148]
full video – Part 1[149]
full video – Part 2[150]
full video – Part 3[151]
full video – Part 4[152]
full video – Parts 1,2,3,4[153]

The Democratic Party's fourth presidential debate was held on Tuesday October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio,[154] from 8 to 11 p.m. EDT.[155] On September 27, the DNC announced that the debate would include all 12 candidates on one night, although some had assumed it would take place on two nights since it had more than 10 participants. From left to right, the candidates were: Gabbard (who missed the previous debate), Steyer (in his first debate), Booker, Harris, Sanders, Biden and Warren (who shared center stage), Buttigieg, Yang, O'Rourke, Klobuchar, and Castro. Podium order for the debate was determined based on an average of the 10 most recently released qualifying polls. CNN anchors Erin Burnett and Anderson Cooper and New York Times national editor Marc Lacey served as the debate moderators.[156]

The debate aired exclusively on CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español, and was streamed on CNN.com's homepage and NYTimes.com's homepage. The debate also streamed live on the following Facebook Pages: CNN, CNN International, CNN Politics, CNN Replay, AC360 and Erin Burnett OutFront.

In addition, the debate was available across mobile devices via CNN's and New York Times' apps for iOS and Android, via CNNgo apps for Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast and Android TV, SiriusXM Channels 116, 454 and 795, the Westwood One Radio Network and National Public Radio.[157]

The Ohio debate featured 12 candidates, setting a record for the highest number of candidates in one presidential debate.

Candidates Airtime (min.)[158]
Warren 22.8
Biden 16.7
Klobuchar 13.3
O'Rourke 13.2
Sanders 13.1
Buttigieg 13.0
Harris 12.4
Booker 11.7
Yang 8.5
Castro 8.4
Gabbard 8.4
Steyer 7.2
Average 12.4

Fifth debate (November 20, 2019)[edit source | edit]

Qualification[edit source | edit]

A memo released by the DNC on September 23 indicated that the qualification period for the November debate started on September 13, and ended on November 13. To qualify in terms of polling, candidates needed to reach three percent or more in four polls approved by the DNC. Alternatively, reaching five percent or more in two DNC-approved polls conducted in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada or South Carolina was also accepted as meeting the polling threshold. To qualify in terms of donors, candidates needed to receive donations from 165,000 unique donors with 600 unique donors in 20 different states, territories or the District of Columbia.[159] Three candidates (Messam, O'Rourke, and Ryan) suspended their campaigns between the fourth and fifth debates.

Summary[edit source | edit]

Template:Infobox debate

The Democratic Party's fifth presidential debate was held on November 20, 2019 from 9 to 11:20 p.m. ET,[25] at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta, Georgia.[172][173][22] It was moderated by Rachel Maddow, Andrea Mitchell, Kristen Welker and Ashley Parker.[25]

The candidates who qualified were Biden, Booker, Buttigieg, Gabbard, Harris, Klobuchar, Sanders, Steyer, Warren and Yang.[52]

Candidates Airtime (min.)[174]
Warren 13.5
Buttigieg 12.9
Biden 12.8
Sanders 11.8
Booker 11.5
Harris 11.5
Klobuchar 11.0