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2020 Malian protests

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2020 Malian protests
Date5 June 2020 – present
Location
Caused by
Goals
Methods
StatusOngoing
Parties to the civil conflict
  • Protesters and dissidents of the government
  • 5 June movement
  • Opposition parties
Lead figures
(no centralized leadership) Mali Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta
(President of Mali)
Mali Boubou Cissé
(Prime Minister of Mali)
Mali Tiéna Coulibaly
(Minister of Defence)
Mali Moussa Timbiné
(President of the National Assembly)
Deaths and injuries
Death(s)11
Injuries124

The ongoing 2020 Malian protests started on 5 June 2020 when protesters gathered in the streets of Bamako, Mali, calling for Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta to resign as president of Mali.[1][2][3][4][5]

Timeline[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. Maclean, Ruth (16 July 2020). "Anger at Mali's President Rises After Security Forces Kill Protesters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  2. "Mali PM apologises for security force 'excesses' during protests". Reuters. 17 July 2020. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  3. "Mali opposition leaders freed after days of anti-gov't protests". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  4. "Calls for calm as Mali gov't criticised for response to protests". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  5. "Mali president dissolves top court amid unrest". BBC News. 12 July 2020. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Diallo, Tiemoko; McAllister, Edward (20 June 2020). Fincher, Christina; Harrison, Mike (eds.). "West African bloc urges Mali to re-run disputed elections amid mass protests". Reuters.
  7. "Mali: President Keita meets protest leader Mahmoud Dicko". Al Jazeera English. A video posted on the presidency's Twitter account showed the meeting between President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita and Mahmoud Dicko, an imam and leading figure of the so-called June 5 movement, in the capital, Bamako, on Saturday.
  8. "Calls for calm as Mali gov't criticised for response to protests". Al Jazeera English. 13 July 2020. Bloody protests broke out in the capital, Bamako, on Friday and Saturday, with reports saying security forces fired live rounds during clashes with demonstrators, some of whom had occupied state buildings. [...] A senior official at an emergency department of a major hospital in Bamako was quoted by AFP news agency as saying 11 people died and 124 were injured since Friday.
  9. Mbah, Fidelis. "West African leaders on high-stakes mission to end Mali standoff". Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  10. "Soldiers seize Mali President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta". Retrieved 19 August 2020.
  11. Mali’s president announces resignation after soldiers mutiny

Template:Mali topics

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