2020 United States Senate election in Maine

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2020 United States Senate election in Maine
Template:Country data Maine
← 2014 November 3, 2020 2026 →
  2015 Susan Collins crop.jpg
Nominee Susan Collins (presumptive) TBD
Party Republican Democratic Party (United States)

Incumbent U.S. senator

Susan Collins
Republican



Template:ElectionsME The 2020 United States Senate election in Maine will be held on November 3, 2020, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the State of Maine, concurrently with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the United States Senate, elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Republican Senator Susan Collins is running for reelection to a fifth term in office.

Background[edit source | edit]

Republican Senator Susan Collins is running for a fifth term. Collins has won each election to this seat with a greater victory margin than the one before it. Observers do not anticipate this election to continue that trend.[1][2][3][4] The New York Times's Ideology Tracker considers Collins the most liberal Republican in the U.S. Senate.[5]

Collins was criticized for her decision to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court.[6][7] She also faced criticism from her stance on the impeachment of President Donald Trump. Collins expressed her support for witness testimony in the Senate trial and was the first Republican to do so.[8] Witness testimony did not occur. Collins voted to acquit Trump on both charges of abuse of power as well as obstruction of Congress.[9][10][11][12] Collins said that she voted to acquit because "impeachment of a president should be reserved for conduct that poses such a serious threat to our governmental institutions as to warrant the extreme step of immediate removal from office. I voted to acquit President Clinton, even though the House Managers proved to my satisfaction that he did commit a crime, because his conduct did not meet that threshold."[13] This vote has made Collins's reelection more competitive than usual.

Of the declared candidates on the Democratic side, the one considered most likely to face Collins is Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives Sara Gideon.[14] In 2019 Gideon faced an election ethics complaint for breaking a political donation law by accepting reimbursements for her political donations from her own PAC; she later apologized for the reimbursements.[15] Another issue is whether Gideon delayed removing Maine state representative Bates, who was accused of underage sexual misconduct while in office.[16][17]

Party primaries were initially scheduled to take place on June 9, 2020. Governor Janet Mills rescheduled them to July 14, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Mills's executive order also expanded the ability to request absentee ballots, which may now be done up to and on election day.[18] The primaries will be conducted with ranked choice voting. Parties qualified to participate in the 2020 primary election are the Democratic Party, the Green Independent Party and the Republican Party.

Republican primary[edit source | edit]

Candidates[edit source | edit]

Nominee (presumptive)[edit source | edit]

Write-in candidate[edit source | edit]

  • Amy Colter, law office manager[20]

Withdrawn[edit source | edit]

Declined[edit source | edit]

Endorsements[edit source | edit]

Template:Endorsements box

Polling[edit source | edit]

Head-to-head matchups[edit source | edit]

Former candidates
with Susan Collins and Derek Levasseur
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Derek
Levasseur
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 55% 10% 34%
Hypothetical polling
with Susan Collins and Paul LePage
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Paul
LePage
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 29% 63% 8%
with Susan Collins and Shawn Moody
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Shawn
Moody
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 36% 45% 18%
with Susan Collins and generic Republican if Collins supported impeaching Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 35% 55% 10
with Susan Collins and Derek Levasseur if Collins supported impeaching Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Derek
Levasseur
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 37% 24% Template:Party shading/Undecided|39%
with Susan Collins and generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 53% 38% 9%

Results[edit source | edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Collins (incumbent)
Republican Amy Colter (write-in)
Total votes 100.0%

Democratic primary[edit source | edit]

On April 20, 2019, attorney and activist Bre Kidman became the first person to announce their candidacy for the Democratic nomination, making them the first ever U.S. Senate candidate who identifies as non-binary.[26] [27] [28] On June 13, 2019, former Maine gubernatorial candidate Betsy Sweet declared her candidacy.[29] Eleven days later, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon announced her candidacy, receiving widespread media coverage.[30][31][32][33] A number of other candidates announced their candidacies, including General Jon Treacy and former Google executive and political aide Ross LaJeunesse, who would have been the first openly gay man elected to the Senate. LaJeunesse and Treacy withdrew, with LaJeunesse endorsing Gideon. Two debates were held with all three candidates, while one hosted by WCSH was attended only by Sweet and Kidman.[34][35][36]

Candidates[edit source | edit]

Declared[edit source | edit]

Withdrawn[edit source | edit]

Declined[edit source | edit]

Endorsements[edit source | edit]

Template:Endorsements box

Template:Endorsements box

Template:Endorsements box

Polling[edit source | edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Sara
Gideon
Betsy
Sweet
Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 306 ± 5.6% 64% 17% 19%[lower-alpha 2]
Colby College/SocialSphere [1] February 10–13, 2020 350 60% 8% 33%[lower-alpha 3]

Results[edit source | edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
style="background-color: Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/color; width: 2px;" | [[Democratic Party (United States)|Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] Sara Gideon
style="background-color: Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/color; width: 2px;" | [[Democratic Party (United States)|Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] Bre Kidman
style="background-color: Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/color; width: 2px;" | [[Democratic Party (United States)|Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] Betsy Sweet
Total votes 100.0%

Other candidates[edit source | edit]

Green Party[edit source | edit]

Two candidates declared their intentions to run for the Maine Green Independent Party's nomination, but one withdrew and the other left the party to become an independent.

Withdrawn[edit source | edit]

  • David Gibson, solar design specialist (endorsed Savage)[57]
  • Lisa Savage, school teacher[58] (switched to independent)[59]

Endorsements[edit source | edit]

Template:Endorsements box

Independents[edit source | edit]

Seven Independents have declared their candidacy for Senate in 2020, including one affiliated with the Libertarian Party of Maine, which lost ballot access after the 2018 elections.[60]

Declared[edit source | edit]

General election[edit source | edit]

Predictions[edit source | edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[65] Template:USRaceRating June 18, 2020
Inside Elections[66] Template:USRaceRating April 3, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[67] Template:USRaceRating April 30, 2020
Daily Kos[68] Template:USRaceRating June 4, 2020
Politico[69] Template:USRaceRating April 19, 2020
RCP[70] Template:USRaceRating July 2, 2020
Niskanen[71] Template:USRaceRating April 28, 2020

Endorsements[edit source | edit]

Template:Endorsements box Template:Endorsements box

Polling[edit source | edit]

Aggregate polls[edit source | edit]

Sara Gideon vs. Susan Collins
Source of poll aggregation Dates administered Dates updated Sara Gideon Susan Collins Other/Undecided[lower-alpha 4] Margin
Real Clear Politics February 10, 2020 - July 3, 2020 July 14, 2020 45.0% 42.5% Gideon +2.5

Gideon vs Collins[edit source | edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Sara
Gideon (D)
Other /
Undecided
Public Policy Polling July 2–3, 2020 1,022 ± 3.1% 42% 46% 11%[lower-alpha 5]
Moore Information (R)Template:Efn-ua June 20–24, 2020[lower-alpha 6] 600 ± 4.0% 45% 37% 4%[lower-alpha 7]
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 ± 4.3% 42% 51% 7%[lower-alpha 8]
Tarrance Group/1820 PAC (R) Late April, 2020 [lower-alpha 9] 48% 47%
Public Policy Polling March 2–3, 2020 872 ± 3.3% 43% 47% 10%[lower-alpha 10]
Colby College/SocialSphere [2] February 10–13, 2020 1,008 ± 3.1% 42% 43% 14%[lower-alpha 11]
Fabrizio Ward/AARP July 29–31, 2019 600 ± 4.0% 52% 35% 13%[lower-alpha 12]
Gravis Marketing June 24, 2019 767 ± 3.5% 52%[lower-alpha 13] 36% 12%[lower-alpha 14]
44%[lower-alpha 15] 30% 26%[lower-alpha 16]
Pan Atlantic Research March 4–13, 2019 500 ± 4.4% 51% 29% 20%[lower-alpha 17]

Sweet vs Collins[edit source | edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Betsy
Sweet (D)
Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 ± 4.3% 43% 44% 10%
Hypothetical polling
with Susan Rice
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Susan
Rice (D)
Other /
Undecided
Emerson College October 27–29, 2018 883 ± 3.5% 44% 20% 35%
with generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 ± 4.3% 39% 49% 12%[lower-alpha 18]
Colby College/SocialSphere [3] Feb 10-13, 2020 1,008 (LV) ± 3.1% 40% 34% 26%
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 ± 3.2% 41% 44% 15%[lower-alpha 19]
Public Policy Polling October 1–2, 2018 ± 3.3% 42% 34%
Public Policy Polling (D)Template:Efn-ua August 28–29, 2017 501 51% 22% 27%[lower-alpha 20]
with generic Democrat if Collins supports impeaching Donald Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 ± 3.2% 32% 38% 30%
with generic Democrat if Collins opposes impeaching Donald Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 ± 3.2% 40% 47% 13%
on whether Collins deserves to be re-elected
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Yes No Other /
Undecided
Fabrizio Ward/AARP July 29–31, 2019 600 ± 4.0% 38% 55% 7%
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[lower-alpha 1]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Fabrizio Ward/AARP July 29–31, 2019 600 ± 4.0% 43% 42% 15%

Results[edit source | edit]

Template:Election box total
United States Senate election in Maine, 2020
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Susan Collins (incumbent)
style="background-color: Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Democratic Party (United States)|Template:Democratic Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] TBD
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Lisa Savage
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Joshua Arnone
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Tiffany Bond
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Steven Golieb
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Leigh Hawes
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Max Linn
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Danielle VanHelsing
style="background-color: Template:Independent (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent (United States)|Template:Independent (United States)/meta/shortname]] Linda Wooten

Notes[edit source | edit]

Partisan clients
Voter samples
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. Undecided with 19%
  3. Undecided with 31%; LaJeunesse with 0%; "another candidate" with 2%
  4. Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  5. Undecided with 11%
  6. Additional data sourced from FiveThirtyEight
  7. Savage (I) with 3%; Linn (I) with 1%
  8. Undecided with 7%
  9. Not released
  10. Undecided with 10%
  11. Undecided with 14%
  12. Undecided with 12%; "Would not vote/would not vote for US Senate" with 1%
  13. If the only two candidates were Collins and Gideon
  14. Undecided with 12%
  15. First choice on an RCV ballot if the candidates were Collins, Gideon and VanHelsing (I)
  16. Undecided with 19%; VanHelsing with 7%
  17. "Other" with 12%; Undecided with 8%
  18. Undecided with 12%
  19. Undecided with 15%
  20. Undecided with 27%

References[edit source | edit]

  1. "2020 Senate Race Ratings". The Cook Political Report.
  2. Leary, Mal (August 17, 2019). "New Report Calls Maine 2020 Senate Race A 'Toss-Up'". Maine Public.
  3. Bowden, John (August 16, 2019). "Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up'". The Hill.
  4. Carrigan, Don (August 23, 2019). "Political expert says next year's Senate race a 'toss-up'". News Center Maine.
  5. Parlapiano, Alicia; Benzaquen, Mercy (2017-06-22). "Where Senators Stand on the Health Care Bill". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-07-11.
  6. "Roll Call Vote 115th Congress - 2nd Session".
  7. "On the Nomination PN2259: Brett M. Kavanaugh, of Maryland, to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States".
  8. "READ: Susan Collins' statement on impeachment witness vote". January 30, 2020.
  9. "Roll Call Vote 116th Congress - 2nd Session".
  10. "Roll Call Vote 116th Congress - 2nd Session".
  11. "Guilty or Not Guilty H.Res. 755, Article I - Abuse of Power".
  12. "Guilty or Not Guilty H.Res. 755, Article II - Obstruction of Congress".
  13. "Susan Collins says Trump 'has learned' from impeachment case".
  14. Skelley, Geoffrey. "Democrats Found A Major Recruit To Take On Susan Collins in 2020". FiveThirtyEight.
  15. Bowden, John (2019-08-23). "Susan Collins challenger hit with ethics complaints over reimbursements". TheHill. Retrieved 2020-07-11.
  16. Press, Associated (2018-08-25). "Maine Democrat at least 30th lawmaker to resign office". Press Herald. Retrieved 2020-07-11.
  17. bangordailynews (2018-08-20). "Democrat accused of sexual misconduct resigns Maine House seat". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 2020-07-11.
  18. Andrews, Caitlin (December 18, 2019). "Mills officially pushes back June elections to July 14". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 10, 2020.
  19. Ohm, Rachel (December 18, 2019). "Sen. Susan Collins announces re-election campaign". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 "MAINE". Politics1. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  21. Shepherd, Michael (March 25, 2019). "A Trump Republican says he'll challenge Susan Collins from the right in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  22. Shepherd, Michael (September 9, 2019). "Longshot Republican primary challenger to Susan Collins exits 2020 race". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 23.3 23.4 23.5 23.6 23.7 Milliard, Mike (May 23, 2019). "Calling all challengers". Pine Tree Watch. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  24. Thistle, Scott (June 8, 2018). "Federal judge rejects Max Linn's effort to run in Maine Republican primary". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  25. @mikeshepherdME (August 4, 2019). ".@BrucePoliquin confirms that he won't run for office in 2020. It might leave @SenatorBrakey alone in the #me02 primary. #mepolitics" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  26. "'Queer Feminist Mermaid' Surfaces to Challenge Susan Collins". Washington Free Beacon. 2019-04-29. Retrieved 2020-06-19.
  27. Journal, Steve CollinsSun (2019-05-03). "'Queer feminist mermaid' hopes to unseat Collins". Lewiston Sun Journal. Retrieved 2020-06-19.
  28. Mikelionis, Lukas (2019-05-08). "'Queer feminist mermaid' Dem aims for Senate seat of Maine's Susan Collins". Fox News. Retrieved 2020-06-19.
  29. 29.0 29.1 Shepherd, Michael (June 13, 2019). "Progressive Democrat Betsy Sweet unveils bid to challenge Susan Collins". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved June 13, 2019.
  30. 30.0 30.1 Graham, Gillian (June 24, 2019). "Gideon announces she will challenge Collins in 2020". Kennebec Journal. Retrieved June 24, 2019.
  31. Saul, Stephanie (June 24, 2019). "Sara Gideon to Challenge Susan Collins for Maine Senate Seat". The New York Times. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  32. Wagner, John (June 24, 2019). "Susan Collins draws a Democratic challenger who seeks to undermine her moderate image". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  33. Cillizza, Chris (June 24, 2019). "Susan Collins had a very bad day today". CNN. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  34. Press, Associated (2020-06-09). "Maine Democratic U.S. Senate hopeful Sara Gideon skips debate". Press Herald. Retrieved 2020-07-13.
  35. "Maine Democratic US Senate hopeful Gideon misses debate". Newsradio WGAN. Retrieved 2020-07-13.
  36. Piper, Jessica (2020-07-07). "Underdogs get last chance to challenge Democratic favorite in Maine US Senate debate". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 2020-07-13.
  37. Collins, Steve (April 22, 2019). "Saco lawyer Bre Kidman seeks Democratic backing to challenge Susan Collins". Lewiston Sun Journal. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  38. Weinland, Gerald [@DirigoBlue] (December 19, 2018). "Michael Bunker of Bangor has filed to run as a Dem against @SenatorCollins in 2020 #mepolitics #mesen" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  39. "Christine Gates". Ballotpedia. Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  40. LaJeunesse, Ross (2020-03-26). "Statement from Ross LaJeunesse". Medium. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  41. Dr Cathleen London [@DrChaya] (July 16, 2018). "I am running because #SCOTUS cannot wait @SenatorCollins needs to realize that Maine & the country are watching & she will be held accountable for her votes #mepolitics My announcement: www.doctorcatlondonforme.com/_api/media-share-server-for-video/crp5?instance-id=5f191a6c-020c-4fc6-9b82-2786411308cb&component-id=comp-jjog8axh&channel-id=2435a32f-3d87-4ae1-aac4-b8175b02e63c&video-id=b3603e263c0a42348786f1c1f8fe8d60&bi-token=8a23ff18-94ae-0e5a-0a87-60cb8863dede … @DrCat4ME" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  42. https://www.fec.gov/data/candidate/S0ME00053/
  43. 43.0 43.1 2019 (2019-01-25). "Independent challenging Collins aims to be first transgender member of Congress | The Times Record". Brunswick Times Record. Retrieved 2019-01-26.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  44. Morin, Ed (October 22, 2019). "Retired General From Oxford Withdraws From US Senate Race". MPBN. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 Shepherd, Michael (January 18, 2019). "Democrats aren't racing to run against Susan Collins in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  46. 46.0 46.1 Cite error: The named reference GideonEndorsements was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  47. 47.0 47.1 47.2 47.3 47.4 Villeneuve, Marina; Peoples, Steve; Pace, Julie (October 9, 2018). "Democrats lining up to consider challenging Collins in 2020". Associated Press. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  48. Dan Merica; Eric Bradner; Gregory Krieg. "The effort to unseat Susan Collins in 2020 is already underway". CNN. Retrieved 2018-10-06.
  49. 49.0 49.1 Collins, Steve (May 6, 2019). "Lewiston lawyer might challenge Collins in 2020". Lewiston Sun Journal.
  50. 50.0 50.1 Shepherd, Michael (June 5, 2019). "Here's the latest on Maine Democrats mulling a run against Susan Collins in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 2, 2019.
  51. Collins, Steve [@SteveCollinsSJ] (May 20, 2019). "Not surprising, but @RepGolden said today he is not going to run for US Senate. He said he respects @SenatorCollins & her approach to governing, even if he doesn't always agree with her. Besides, he said, his #ME02 seat is "not a stepping stone" & he plans to stay. #mepolitics" (Tweet). Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Twitter.
  52. "Former Maine Gov. John Baldacci wants Stephen King to run for office: 'You've got a winner there'". Washington Examiner. 2017-09-12. Retrieved 2018-10-28.
  53. Budryk, Zack (2019-06-24). "Stephen King: 'It's time for Susan Collins to go'". TheHill. Retrieved 2019-06-28.
  54. 54.0 54.1 Stuart, Tessa (2018-10-05). "Anti-Susan Collins Campaign Raises $2 Million, Crashes During Kavanaugh Speech". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2018-10-06.
  55. Gray, Emma; Vagianos, Alanna (April 11, 2019). "Susan Rice Will Not Run Against Susan Collins For Maine Senate Seat In 2020". HuffPost. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  56. Emerson, Anthony Matthew [@AnthonyEmerso14] (June 17, 2019). "Love that Betsy Sweet has a disclaimer on emails sent from email lists that were not her own. Shows a commitment to transparency. Also, hey, @RingelsteinME is backing her!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  57. Shepherd, Michael (July 23, 2019). "Green candidate's entry pushes Maine toward ranked-choice U.S. Senate race in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  58. "Lisa for Maine".
  59. 59.0 59.1 59.2 Shephard, Michael (February 24, 2020). "Green US Senate candidate to unenroll for easier path to Maine ballot in 2020". BDN Politics. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  60. @MESecofState (December 17, 2018). "1/2 The Libertarian Party no longer has party status in the State of Maine, as it did not reach the threshold of 10,000 voters in the Nov. 6 General Election, as required in Maine law. If you were enrolled as a Libertarian, you are now "unenrolled" as of Dec. 4" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  61. Bond, Tiffany [@TiffanyBond] (November 14, 2019). "If only you hadn't voted for a tax bill that buries us in an absurd amount of debt and hinders our flexibility to find solutions. You may not have children, but I do, and they deserve a goddam future without crippling debt and a crumbling planet. Hire a mom for Senate" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  62. "Millinocket town councilor enters race to unseat Susan Collins". Bangor Daily News. February 9, 2020. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  63. Cover, Susan (April 15, 2020). "Stay-at-home order threatens to derail independent candidates". Pine Tree Watch. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  64. "Lisa for Maine".
  65. "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  66. "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  67. "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  68. "Daily Kos Elections 19-20". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  69. "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  70. "Battle for the Senate". RCP. July 14, 2020.
  71. "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.

External links[edit source | edit]

Official campaign websites

Visibility[edit source | edit]

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