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2020 United States election protests

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2020 United States presidential election protests
DateNovember 4, 2020–present
LocationSeveral cities across the U.S.
CausePresident Donald Trump's claims of electoral fraud.[1][2][3][4]
Motive
  • To halt the vote counting process (for pro-Trump supporters)[5][6]
  • To demand transparency and fight against fraud[7][8]
  • To continue the vote counting process (for anti-Trump supporters, and for Trump supporters in Arizona)[5][6]
Arrests61+[9]

The 2020 United States election protests are an ongoing series of protests across multiple cities in the United States in the aftermath of the 2020 United States presidential election between the incumbent Donald Trump and challenger Joe Biden.

Protests[edit source | edit]

November 4[edit source | edit]

  • In Chicago, hundreds of anti-Trump protesters gathered to express their anger toward Trump's demand for voting to stop. City officials raised the Wabash Avenue Bridge in a preemptive move to ward off unrest near Trump Tower.[10]
  • In Minneapolis, police arrested and then released 646 protesters who were blocking Interstate 94. It is unclear how many, if any, went to jail.[11][12]
  • In Manhattan, protesters and police clash, resulting in 25 arrests and more than 30 summonses.[13][11]
  • In Phoenix, Arizona, pro-Trump protesters gathered to demand the city's remaining ballots be counted.[14]
  • In Portland, Oregon, anti-Trump protests which demanded that every vote in the election be counted led to the declaration of a riot after police saw people smashing business windows. In the interest of public safety, Oregon Governor Kate Brown activated the state's National Guard to help police manage the unrest.[15]
  • In Seattle, eight protesters were arrested.[16]

November 5[edit source | edit]

  • Facebook banned a group page called "Stop the Steal", which was used by Trump supporters to organize protests against the election results after his allegations of electoral fraud. It achieved 300,000 followers before Facebook shut it down, citing calls for violence by some participants.[17]
  • Police acting on a tip alleging a group plotted to attack the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, where votes were being counted, arrested two armed men for firearm violations; another gun was found in their Hummer.[18][19]

November 6[edit source | edit]

  • In Detroit, 200 pro-Trump protesters, some armed with pistols, rallied outside the tally room at TCF Center as Biden and Kamala Harris took the vote count lead in Michigan.[20]
  • In Portland, protesters vandalized a city commissioner's house before setting fire to City Hall.[21]
  • In Pittsburgh, competing groups of pro-Trump and anti-Trump protesters clashed near where Allegheny County officials continued their ballot counts.[20]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. "Vote counts push Biden closer to victory as Trump falsely claims election being 'stolen'". Reuters. November 5, 2020. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  2. "Facebook group pushing false claim of stolen U.S. election rapidly gains 325,000 members". Reuters. Reuters. November 5, 2020.
  3. "Facebook Imposes Limits on Election Content, Bans 'Stop the Steal' Group". Wall Street Journal. November 5, 2020.
  4. McCluskey, Megan (November 5, 2020). "Facebook Shuts Down Large Pro-Trump 'Stop the Steal' Group for Spreading Election Misinformation and Calling for Violence". TIME.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Bellisle, Martha; Geller, Adam (November 6, 2020). "More than a dozen arrested as protesters demand vote count". AP News. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Beaumont, Peter (November 5, 2020). "Trump supporters protest at Arizona vote counting centre". The Guardian. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  7. "Protesters demand all votes be counted as lawsuit draws Team Trump to Pennsylvania". CBC. November 5, 2020.
  8. "The MAGA bullhorn shouts Trump's baseless claims of fraud". Politico. November 4, 2020.
  9. "Police arrest 11 in Portland, 50 in New York over U.S. election protests". Global News.
  10. Cauguiran, Cate; Team, ABC7 Chicago Digital; Kirsch, Jesse (November 5, 2020). "Chicago protest: 'Count Every Vote' group marches through Loop calling on Trump to concede 2020 election; no arrests made". ABC7 Chicago. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  11. 11.0 11.1 "'Count Every Vote!' Large Postelection Protests Seen In Several U.S. Cities". NPR.org. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  12. "Demonstrators Arrested In Minneapolis After Hundreds Walk Onto I-94 In Protest Of Election". November 4, 2020. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  13. Shanahan, Ed (November 5, 2020). "Police 'Kettle' Protesters in Manhattan, Arresting Dozens". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  14. Beaumont, Peter (November 5, 2020). "Trump supporters descend on Arizona voting centre". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  15. Press, Associated. "Riot declared in Portland as rioters smash windows". POLITICO. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  16. Staff, KIRO 7 News. "8 arrested in Seattle election night protests". KIRO. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  17. Kelly, Makena (November 5, 2020). "Facebook shuts down huge "Stop the Steal" group". The Verge. Retrieved November 7, 2020.
  18. Conley, Lisa (November 6, 2020). "Philadelphia police investigating alleged plot to attack convention center where ballots are being counted". TheHill. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  19. Brooks, Bob; Davis, Corey (November 6, 2020). "Police thwart alleged plot to attack Pa. Convention Center where votes are being counted in Philly". 6abc Philadelphia. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Witsil, Omar Abdel-Baqui, Slone Terranella and Frank. "Protesters rally at TCF Center as Biden's lead overtakes Trump in key states". USA TODAY. Retrieved November 7, 2020.
  21. News, A. B. C. "Protesters in Portland target a city commissioner's home, set fire to city hall". ABC News. Retrieved November 6, 2020.

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