A cup of hot tea to welcome you!


This is Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Wikiafripedia is aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.
WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

A cup of hot tea to welcome you!

Welcome to Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.


WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

2020 World Rally Championship

From Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions or browse at zero-rating.
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2020 FIA World Rally Championship
World Drivers' Champion:
Sébastien Ogier
World Co-drivers' Champion:
Julien Ingrassia
World Manufacturers' Champion:
Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT
Previous: 2019 Next: 2021
Support series:
FIA World Rally Championship-2
FIA World Rally Championship-3
FIA Junior World Rally Championship
Sébastien Ogier won his seventh drivers' championship title.
Julien Ingrassia won his seventh co-drivers' championship title.
Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT (i20 Coupe WRC pictured) claimed the manufacturers' title for the second straight year.

The 2020 FIA World Rally Championship was the forty-eighth season of the World Rally Championship, an auto racing competition recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) as the highest class of international rallying. Teams and crews were competing in seven rallies for the World Rally Championships for Drivers, Co-drivers and Manufacturers. Crews were free to compete in cars complying with Rally1 and Rally2 regulations;[lower-alpha 1] however, only manufacturers competing with World Rally Cars homologated under regulations introduced in 2017 were eligible to score points in the Manufacturers' championship. The championship began in January 2020 with the Rallye Monte-Carlo and concluded in December 2020 with Rally Monza. The series was supported by the World Rally Championship-2, World Rally Championship-3 and Junior World Rally Championship categories at selected events.[1]

The championship was heavily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Originally thirteen events were planned, but with more events being cancelled due to the pandemic, and some new ones added as replacement, eventually seven events were held.

Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja were the defending Drivers' and Co-drivers' Champions, having secured their maiden titles at the 2019 Rally Catalunya.[2] Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT, the team Tänak and Järveoja compete for, were the defending Manufacturers' Champions.[3][lower-alpha 2] Hyundai won their maiden manufacturers' title when the final round of the 2019 championship was cancelled.[5]

At the conclusion of the championship, Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia won their seventh world titles after winning the 2020 Rally Monza. In doing so, Ogier and Ingrassia became the first crew to win the championship with three different manufacturers.[6][lower-alpha 3] Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin finished second, trailing Ogier and Ingrassia by eight points. Defending World Champions Tänak and Järveoja were third, a further nine points behind. In the manufacturers' championship, Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT successfully defended their title, five points cleared of Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT, with M-Sport Ford WRT in third.

Calendar[edit source | edit]

A map showing the locations of the rallies in the 2020 championship. Scheduled events are in green, while cancelled events are in blue. Event headquarters are marked with a black dot.

The 2020 championship was due to be contested over thirteen rounds in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, North and South America and Oceania,[7][8] but the calendar had been reduced to seven rounds due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[9]

Round Start date Finish date Rally Rally headquarters Surface Stages Distance Ref.
1 23 January 26 January Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo Gap, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur Mixed[lower-alpha 4] 16 304.28 km [10]
2 13 February 16 February Template:Country data SWE Rally Sweden Torsby, Värmland Snow 11 171.64 km[lower-alpha 5] [12]
3 12 March 15 March Mexico Rally Guanajuato México León, Guanajuato Gravel 21 268.84 km[lower-alpha 6] [14]
4 4 September 6 September Template:Country data EST Rally Estonia Tartu, Tartu County Gravel 17 232.64 km [15]
5 18 September 20 September Turkey Rally of Turkey Marmaris, Muğla Gravel 12 223.00 km [16]
6 8 October 11 October Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Alghero, Sardinia Gravel 16 238.84 km [17]
7 3 December 6 December Italy ACI Rally Monza Monza, Monza and Brianza Tarmac 16 239.20 km [18]
Source:[9][19][20]

The following rounds were included on the original calendar published by WRC Promoter GmbH, but were later cancelled:

Start date Finish date Rally Rally headquarters Surface Stages Distance Cancellation reason Ref.
16 April 19 April Template:Country data CHL Rally Chile Concepción, Biobío Gravel N/A N/A Political unrest [21]
23 April[lower-alpha 7] 26 April[lower-alpha 7] Argentina Rally Argentina Villa Carlos Paz, Córdoba Gravel 16 322.36 km COVID-19 pandemic [23][24]
21 May 24 May Template:Country data PRT Rally de Portugal Matosinhos, Porto Gravel 22 331.10 km COVID-19 pandemic [25][26]
16 July 19 July Kenya Safari Rally Kenya Nairobi, Nairobi County Gravel 18 315.12 km COVID-19 pandemic [27][28]
6 August 9 August Template:Country data FIN Rally Finland Jyväskylä, Central Finland Gravel 24 321.87 km COVID-19 pandemic [29][30]
3 September 6 September New Zealand Rally New Zealand Auckland, Auckland Region Gravel N/A N/A COVID-19 pandemic [31]
15 October 18 October Germany ADAC Rallye Deutschland Bostalsee, Saarland Tarmac N/A N/A COVID-19 pandemic [32]
29 October 1 November United Kingdom Wales Rally GB Llandudno, Conwy Gravel N/A N/A COVID-19 pandemic [33]
19 November 22 November Japan Rally Japan Nagoya, Chūbu Tarmac 19 307.78 km COVID-19 pandemic [34][35]
20 November 22 November Template:Country data BEL Renties Ypres Rally Belgium Ypres, West Flanders Tarmac 23 265.69 km COVID-19 pandemic [36][37]
Source:[19][20][22]

Calendar changes[edit source | edit]

For further information, see Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on motorsport#World Rally Championship

With the addition of Rally Chile to the calendar in 2019, the FIA opened the tender process for new events to join the championship in 2020.[38] Bids to revive Rally Japan and the Safari Rally were received, and candidate events were run in 2019.[39][40] Both events were accepted to the 2020 calendar, as was a proposal to revive Rally New Zealand.[7] However, none of the aforementioned events were run due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[28][31][35]

  • The Safari Rally was scheduled to be run as a World Championship event for the first time since 2002. The event is to be based in the Kenyan capital Nairobi and feature stages around Lake Naivasha.[41] In contrast to the event's traditional endurance format, which featured stages hundreds of kilometres long, the 2020 Safari Rally was planned to follow a compact route to comply with FIA regulations mandating the maximum route distance.[27]
  • Rally Japan was scheduled to return to the calendar for the first time since 2010, replacing Rally Australia as the final round of the championship. The rally was scheduled to move away from its original headquarters in Hokkaidō to a new base in Nagoya and was to be run on tarmac rather than gravel.[42]
  • Rally New Zealand was scheduled to return to the calendar for the first time since 2012. The event was planned to return to Auckland.[7]

The addition of these events saw the Tour de Corse and the Rallies of Catalunya and Australia removed from the calendar.[8] Organisers of Rally Catalunya agreed to forfeit their place on the 2020 calendar as part of a rotation system that will see European events host rallies in two out of three calendar years. The Tour de Corse was removed in response to concerns from teams about the logistics of visiting Corsica, while Rally Australia was removed as the event's base in a regional centre rather than a major metropolitan area meant that the rally struggled to attract spectators.[8] Rally Chile was included on the original calendar, but was later removed in the face of ongoing political unrest in the country.[21] The FIA sought a replacement event to ensure that the calendar retained its planned fourteen rounds,[43] but were unable to do so.[22]

The Rallies in Italy were postponed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.[24] Events in Argentina,[44] Portugal,[26] Kenya,[28] Finland,[30] New Zealand,[31] Germany,[32] Great Britain[33] and Japan were cancelled.[35] Organisers of the championship announced that they were considering adding events to the schedule that had not been part of the original calendar.[45] Estonia, Belgium, Latvia, Croatia and Czech Republic were among the countries who had expressed interest in hosting the event.[46]

The running date of Rally Turkey was moved forward by a week, which facilitates the opportunity for additional rounds.[47] Further calendar options may include Ypres Rally and Croatia Rally.[44] Following the cancellation of Rallye Deutschland, the running date of Rally Sardegna was moving forward by three weeks.[48] This decision was intended to avoid the clash with the 2020 Emilia Romagna Grand Prix of Formula One.[32]

Estonia (Rally headquarter Tartu pictured) was the thirty-third country to host a World Rally Championship rally.

On 2 July 2020, it was announced that the season would return with an updated calendar. The season restarted with newcomers Rally Estonia hosting the resuming round between 4 and 6 September. The country became the thirty-third nation to stage a championship round in the WRC.[49]

Following the cancellation of Rally Japan, it was announced that Ypres Rally, officially Renties Ypres Rally Belgium, would replace Rally Japan to hold the seventh round of the season. The Sunday's route would feature the iconic Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps in Stavelot, which would run with the 2020 World RX of Benelux of the World Rallycross Championship.[50] Belgium was set to be the thirty-fourth country to hold a WRC event,[51] but were unable to do so as the rally was eventually called off due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[9]

Calendar newcomer Rally Monza was the season's finale.

Rally Monza was announced to be the final round of the season on 9 October. This meant Italy staged two WRC events in one season as the country also stages the Sardinia rally.[52] The rally was based in the famous Autodromo Nazionale di Monza circuit near Milan, where the Italian Grand Prix is held every year.[53]

Route changes[edit source | edit]

Prior to the Rally Sweden, it was confirmed that the route for the rally had to be shortened due to a lack of snow.[11] The route of Rally Mexico was shortened to allow teams time to pack up and return to their headquarters before several European nations imposed travel bans in a bid to manage the pandemic.[13]

Entries[edit source | edit]

The following teams and crews were under contract to contest the 2020 championship.[lower-alpha 8] Ford, Hyundai and Toyota were all represented by manufacturer teams and eligible to score points in the FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers. All competitors used tyres supplied by Michelin.[54]

World Rally Car entries eligible to score manufacturer points
Manufacturer Entrant Car Tyre No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Ford United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC Template:Michelin 3 Template:Country data FIN Teemu Suninen Template:Country data FIN Jarmo Lehtinen All
4 Template:Country data FIN Esapekka Lappi Template:Country data FIN Janne Ferm All
44 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson 1, 3–7
Hyundai South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC Template:Michelin 6 Spain Dani Sordo Spain Carlos del Barrio 3, 6–7
8 Template:Country data EST Ott Tänak Template:Country data EST Martin Järveoja All
9 France Sébastien Loeb Monaco Daniel Elena 1, 5
11 Template:Country data BEL Thierry Neuville Template:Country data BEL Nicolas Gilsoul All
16 Template:Country data IRL Craig Breen Template:Country data IRL Paul Nagle 2
42 Template:Country data IRL Craig Breen Template:Country data IRL Paul Nagle 4
France Hyundai 2C Competition Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC Template:Michelin 7 France Pierre-Louis Loubet France Vincent Landais 4–6
96 Norway Ole Christian Veiby Template:Country data SWE Jonas Andersson 7
Toyota Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC Template:Michelin 17 France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia All
33 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin All
69 Template:Country data FIN Kalle Rovanperä Template:Country data FIN Jonne Halttunen All
Sources:[55][56][57][58][59][60][61]
World Rally Car entries ineligible to score manufacturer points
Manufacturer Entrant Car Tyre No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Citroën France Saintéloc Junior Team Citroën C3 WRC Template:Pirelli 21 Norway Petter Solberg Norway Andreas Mikkelsen 6
Ford Template:Country data FIN JanPro Ford Fiesta WRC Template:Michelin 65 Template:Country data FIN Kimmo Kurkela Template:Country data FIN Reeta Hämäläinen 4
United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC Template:Michelin [lower-alpha 9] Template:Country data LTU Deividas Jocius Template:Country data LTU Mindaugas Varža 1–3
Template:Country data CZE MP-Sports Ford Fiesta RS WRC Template:Michelin 22 Template:Country data CZE Martin Prokop Template:Country data CZE Zdeněk Jůrka 6
Template:Country data EST OT Racing Ford Fiesta WRC Template:Michelin 64 Template:Country data EST Georg Gross Template:Country data EST Raigo Mõlder 4
Toyota Template:Country data FIN Latvala Motorsport Toyota Yaris WRC Template:Michelin 10 Template:Country data FIN Jari-Matti Latvala Template:Country data FIN Juho Hänninen 2
Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC Template:Michelin 18 Japan Takamoto Katsuta United Kingdom Daniel Barritt 1–2, 4, 6–7
Sources:[55][56][57][58][60][61]

Summary[edit source | edit]

Citroën (C3 WRC pictured) withdrew from the championship.

Reigning World Champions Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja left Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT and moved to Hyundai Motorsport.[4] The Estonian pair chose not to compete with the number 1,[62] which may only be used by the defending champions.[63] Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul remained with Hyundai, marking their seventh season with the team.[64] Sébastien Loeb and Daniel Elena also renewed their contracts with the team.[65] Loeb and Elena will contest the championship on a part-time basis, sharing their car with the crew of Dani Sordo and Carlos del Barrio.[66] Crews led by Andreas Mikkelsen and Craig Breen were left without drives.[67] Hyundai announced that they could form a second team for Breen and Mikkelsen to contest selected rallies,[67] and entered Breen at the rally of Sweden,[68] Estonia[69] and Belgium.[70] Mikkelsen returned to action at the Rally Sardegna, co-driving with Template:WRC World Drivers' Champion Petter Solberg. They contested the rally in Shakedown and Power Stage with Pirelli tyres to be used for Template:WRC season.[71]

The Citroën World Rally Team had committed to entering two full-time entries instead of three, continuing the policy they introduced in 2019. Sébastien Ogier and Esapekka Lappi were under contract to lead the team's crews until the team announced that they would withdraw from the championship with immediate effect. Citroën cited Ogier's decision to leave the team as the reason for withdrawing,[72][lower-alpha 10] but pledged support for independent teams competing with the R5 variant of the Citroën C3 WRC in the championship's support categories.[73] The company also expressed a willingness to sell or rent their C3 WRCs to teams looking to compete in the sport's premier category.[74]

Nineteen-year-old Finn Kalle Rovanperä made his début in the sport's top class with his fellow co-driver Jonne Halttunen.

Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT featured an entirely new line-up in 2020.[75] Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia replaced Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja, while Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin were recruited from M-Sport Ford WRT. Reigning World Rally Championship-2 Pro champions Kalle Rovanperä and Jonne Halttunen made their competitive début in Toyota's third car. Toyota entered an additional two cars for Jari-Matti Latvala and Takamoto Katsuta on a part-time basis.[76][77] Katsuta will contest all of the European rallies under the Toyota Gazoo Racing name while Latvala will contest two events—with further starts depending on his budget—as an independent entrant.[76] Former Toyota Gazoo Racing driver Juho Hänninen became Latvala's co-driver, replacing Miikka Anttila.[78] Anttila moved to the World Rally Championship-3, partnering Eerik Pietarinen.[56] Kris Meeke remained under contract with the team,[79] but stepped back from full-time competition.[80]

M-Sport Ford WRT continued their policy of entering two crews on a full-time basis and a third crew contesting selected rounds. Teemu Suninen and Jarmo Lehtinen were retained,[81] while Esapekka Lappi and Janne Ferm replaced Evans and Martin in the team's second car.[82] Gus Greensmith and Elliott Edmondson, who contested three rounds of the 2019 championship with the team, is set to contest an expanded programme of nine rounds in 2020.[82]

Norwegian driver Ole Christian Veiby made his World Rally Car debut in Monza.

Reigning World Rally Championship-2 champions Pierre-Louis Loubet and Vincent Landais made their debut in a World Rally Car in Estonia.[83] Loubet was set to combine his World Rally Championship programme with a factory-supported drive in the World Rally Championship-2, but was unable to do so.[84] Ole Christian Veiby made his World Rally Car debut in Monza, taking over Loubet's i20.[85]

Regulation changes[edit source | edit]

Sporting regulations[edit source | edit]

The eligibility requirements for crews entering events will be simplified and streamlined into a system called the "FIA Rally Pyramid".[1] The top tier of the sport, known as "Rally 1" will be for World Rally Cars built to regulations introduced in 2017. The second tier, "Rally 2", will be for manufacturer teams and professional independent teams entering R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-2. This will be followed by "Rally 3" for privately entered and "gentlemen driver" crews competing with R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-3. "Rally 4" entries will not contest their own dedicated championship, but will instead serve as a bridging category aimed at making the step from R2 to R5 more manageable by allowing R2 entries to be equipped with four-wheel drive. The final tier, "Rally 5", will be for crews entering R2 cars in the Junior World Rally Championship.[1]

Other than the normal approach to the WRC Manufacturer Championship, the FIA introduced a new regulation of "WRC Team" this year. A WRC team is eligible to score points only when there is a team scoring points in the WRC Manufacturer Championship with the same car homologation.[86]

The FIA implemented a temporary testing ban in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The ban was imposed because the three manufacturer teams were based in different countries—Hyundai in Germany, M-Sport in Britain and Toyota in Finland—each with their own restrictions. This created the potential for one team to gain a competitive advantage because of their home nation's restrictions.[87]

The road order was revised in response to the shortened route at the calendar newcomers, Rally Estonia. Saturday's morning loop was started as championship order, while the afternoon loop was reverted to the standard reversed order, which usually comes into effect on the second leg.[88]

Season report[edit source | edit]

Opening rounds[edit source | edit]

The 2020 FIA World Rally Championship started in Monaco. The sport saw a series of crew changes in the off-season, which included reigning world champions Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja moving to Hyundai.[4] Tänak and Järveoja's title defence started poorly when they suffered a high-speed crash on the fourth stage of the rally, which saw their Hyundai i20 flying off a 40 m (131.2 ft) high cliff at 180 km/h (111.8 mph), rolling end-over-end through a series of trees and landing on the road below; both Tänak and Järveoja walked away uninjured.[89] Following the crash, Hyundai's hopes rode on the shoulders of Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul. Despite holding the lead on Thursday night, Friday saw the Toyota crews of Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia their and teammates Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin take the lead.[90][91] The lead would swing backwards and forwards throughout the rally until Neuville and Gilsoul won seven out of the eight final stage—including winning the Power Stage—to record their first win in Monte Carlo.[92]

A lack of snow forced the Rally Sweden to be shortened.

As championship leaders, Neuville and Gilsoul became the first crew on the road in Sweden.[93] This saw them struggle throughout the weekend as their position meant they swept loose gravel away from the faster road base underneath, which was further complicated by the rally being shortened due to a lack of snow.[11] The rally was eventually won by Evans and Martin. They dominated the rally, winning five stages out of nine, to take victory; Evans' second and a first for Martin.[94] They then led both drivers' and co-drivers' standings for the first time in their careers.[95] Their teammate Kalle Rovanperä recorded his first stage win at the sport's highest level when he and co-driver Jonne Halttunen won the Power Stage. Rovanperä and Halttunen also achieved their maiden podium finish.[96] At the age of nineteen, Rovanperä became the youngest driver ever to claim a WRC podium finish.[96]

As the championship continued on to Latin America, the world began to feel the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the Rally Mexico began as planned, the final leg of the rally was cancelled to allow teams enough time to return to their home bases in Europe before travel restrictions came into effect.[97] This meant the rally was shortened to two legs. Tänak and Järveoja were leading the first leg until suspension damage saw them drop over forty seconds.[98] Neuville and Gilsoul were running third overall, but they had to retire from the day with electrical problem.[98] Hyundai's third entry of Dani Sordo and Carlos del Barrio suffered a radiator pipe issue on the morning loop which lost them five minutes,[99] and they ultimately retired with a terminal engine fault.[98] Esapekka Lappi and Janne Ferm also retired when their Fiesta caught fire.[100] Ogier and Ingrassia enjoyed a trouble-free weekend and won their first rally of the season.[101] With a consistent performance in the early season, the six-time world champions took an early lead in the championships. The result also saw Toyota expand their lead in the manufacturers' championship, twenty-one points ahead of defending manufacturer champions Hyundai.[101]

Season resumption[edit source | edit]

The season restarted in the calendar newcomer Estonia.[102] The rally marked the return of the FIA World Rally Championship after a half-year hiatus by the COVID-19 pandemic and was the 600th event since the championship was founded back in Template:WRC.[103][104] Winning the warm-up event, local favourites Tänak and Järveoja were determined to vanquish their home soil for the third straight year.[105] The reigning world champions showed impressive speed throughout the weekend, leading almost the entire rally to win their first rally for Hyundai in their home country.[106] Teammate Neuville and Gilsoul had another weekend to forget. The Belgian crew retired on Saturday afternoon after they damaged their rear-right suspension.[107] Things went from bad to worse after rejoining the rally on Sunday as another electrical issue in the penultimate stage meant no chance for consolation points from the Power Stage.[108] Hyundai's third entry of Craig Breen and Paul Nagle finished second after a consistent performance to complete a Hyundai 1–2.[106] Rovanperä became the youngest driver to lead a WRC rally at the age of nineteen when he was briefly leading the event at an early stage, but a one-minute time penalty was given after his co-driver Halttunen illegally removed the radiator blanking plate.[109] Takamoto Katsuta and Daniel Barritt were running fifth overall until they rolled their Yaris on Sunday morning.[110] The Japanese driver lost what would've been a career-best finish.[111] Pierre-Louis Loubet and Vincent Landais also retired from their top-class debut as they broke their steering.[106]

Moving to Rally Turkey, where crews had to face the challenge of rough roads and rock storm,[112] Sébastien Loeb and Daniel Elena took an early lead on Friday. At the age of forty-six, Loeb became the oldest driver to lead a WRC event.[113] Saturday saw reigning world champions Tänak and Järveoja retire from the day. The Estonian crew's i20 speared off the road because of a steering issue.[114] Ogier and Ingrassia led the rally on Saturday morning until a puncture and hydraulics issue dropped them over half a minute, which gave the lead to Neuville and Gilsoul.[115] Sunday's first pass through the Çetibeli stage saw tyre dramas, with five crews suffering punctures, including the crew of Neuville and Gilsoul, Loeb and Elena, Ogier and Ingrassia, Rovanperä and Halttunen, and Lappi and Ferm, with two more crews retiring from the rally. This massively changed the overall rally standings—Evans and Martin moved up three places to become the new rally leaders.[116] By contrast, teammate Ogier and Ingrassia's weekend went even worse. The engine of the French crew's Toyota Yaris caught fire during the second test through Çetibeli. The six-time world champions had no choice but to stop in the stage and retire from the rally.[117] Eventually, Evans and Martin safely complete the event to record a second win of the season with a margin of over thirty seconds over Neuville and Gilsoul, who won the Power Stage.[118] Without retirements, Evans and Martin regained the championship lead.[119] Gus Greensmith and Elliott Edmondson were the leading M-Sport crew. They had a rather trouble-free rally to finish a career-high fifth place.[118]

Closing rounds[edit source | edit]

The thin layer of slippery gravel of Sardegna meant a late road position would be helpful for a good result.[120] Sordo and del Barrio made full use of this advantage to build a commanding lead of over thirty seconds going onto Sunday.[121] The Spanish crew eventually won the rally for the second straight year although their i20's rear subframe was inspected and deemed to be underweight post-race.[122] There was an epic battle for the runner-up spot between the crew of Neuville and Gilsoul and world champions Ogier and Ingrassia, with Neuville and Gilsoul ultimately coming out on top.[123] The top three crews were separated by only 6.1 seconds, the smallest margin to cover the podium places in the WRC history.[124] With a 1-2 finish, Hyundai reclaimed the championship lead.[125] Rovanperä and Halttunen had a weekend to forget. The Finnish crew first rolled their Yaris in the Shakedown on Thursday,[126] and then retired from the rally on Saturday when they crashed out.[127] Lappi and Ferm also retired from the event due to a terminal engine failure.[128] A suspension issue saw reigning world champions Tänak and Järveoja only manage to complete the rally in sixth position, but they won the Power Stage to score five bonus points.[128] Pierre-Louis Loubet and Vincent Landais enjoyed a trouble-free weekend, scoring their first points in a World Rally Car by finishing seventh overall.[123]

Elfyn Evans (left) and Scott Martin (right) were leading the drivers' and co-drivers' championships throughout almost an entire season, but an error in the final round cost them both titles.

The championship finished in Monza, featuring tricky weather conditions, which spelt trouble in all terms.[129] The very first stage saw Katsuta and Barritt overshoot a corner and crash into a wall.[130] Neuville and Gilsoul had a mathematical chance of winning the titles coming to the event, but it was smashed during the fourth stage when a pool of heavy standing water drowned out their car as their i20's right-front suspension was damaged earlier in the stage.[131] Greensmith and Edmondson were caught out during the first test of Saturday's afternoon loop, while Ole Christian Veiby and Jonas Andersson also retired from the rally at the same spot after a violent crash.[132] The very next stage saw championship leader Evans and Martin go off the road on the icy and slushy surface, which left the championship wide open.[133] The other major retirement of the rally is the M-Sport Ford crew of Teemu Suninen and Jarmo Lehtinen. An unfixable misfiring engine led their season to an early end.[134] Ogier and Ingrassia were the crew who won the season's finale after overcoming a limit-visibility issue.[135] Benefiting from their rivals' retirements, the French crew won their seventh world titles. Hyundai had a 2–3 finish this weekend, which was enough to secure their second consecutive manufacturers' title.[136]

Results and standings[edit source | edit]

Season summary[edit source | edit]

Round Event Winning driver Winning co-driver Winning entrant Winning time Report Ref.
1 Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo Template:Country data BEL Thierry Neuville Template:Country data BEL Nicolas Gilsoul South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 3:10:57.6 Report [137][138]
2 Template:Country data SWE Rally Sweden United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 1:11:43.1 Report [139][140]
3 Mexico Rally Guanajuato México France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:47:47.6 Report [141][142]
4 Template:Country data EST Rally Estonia Template:Country data EST Ott Tänak Template:Country data EST Martin Järveoja South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 1:59:53.6 Report [143][144]
5 Turkey Marmaris Rally of Turkey United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:43:02.7 Report [145][146]
6 Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Spain Dani Sordo Spain Carlos del Barrio South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 2:41:37.5 Report [147][148]
7 Italy ACI Rally Monza France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:15:51.0 Report [149][150]

Scoring system[edit source | edit]

Points were awarded to the top ten classified finishers in each event. In the manufacturers' championship, teams were eligible to nominate three crews to score points, but these points were only awarded to the top two classified finishers representing a manufacturer and driving a 2017-specification World Rally Car. There were also five bonus points awarded to the winners of the Power Stage, four points for second place, three for third, two for fourth and one for fifth. Power Stage points were only awarded in the drivers' and co-drivers' championships.[151]

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1

FIA World Rally Championship for Drivers[edit source | edit]

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX[lower-alpha 11]
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
1 France Sébastien Ogier 22 43 1 34 Ret 33 1 122
2 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans 34 1 4 42 14 44 293 114
3 Template:Country data EST Ott Tänak Ret 24 2 13 172 61 22 105
4 Template:Country data BEL Thierry Neuville 11 62 16 Ret 21 22 Ret 87
5 Template:Country data FIN Kalle Rovanperä 5 31 5 51 43 Ret 5 80
6 Template:Country data FIN Esapekka Lappi 45 55 Ret 7 6 Ret 44 52
7 Template:Country data FIN Teemu Suninen 83 8 3 6 Ret 5 Ret 44
8 Spain Dani Sordo Ret 15 35 42
9 Template:Country data IRL Craig Breen 7 25 25
10 France Sébastien Loeb 6 35 24
11 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith 63 9 8 5 25 Ret 16
12 Template:Country data SWE Pontus Tidemand 15 6 15 8 10 10 14
13 Japan Takamoto Katsuta 7 9 Ret Ret 201 13
14 Template:Country data FIN Jari Huttunen 10 11 8 8 9
15 Norway Andreas Mikkelsen 6 8
16 Poland Kajetan Kajetanowicz 14 Ret 7 9 14 8
17 Template:Country data SWE Oliver Solberg 25 17 Ret 9 18 7 8
18 Russia Nikolay Gryazin 16 21 7 19 Ret 6
19 France Pierre-Louis Loubet Ret Ret 7 6
20 Template:Country data BOL Marco Bulacia Wilkinson 8 14 10 11 16 5
21 Norway Mads Østberg 10 12 10 14 9 4
22 France Adrien Fourmaux 15 18 13 9 Ret 49 2
23 France Eric Camilli 9 Ret 2
24 Norway Ole Christian Veiby Ret 13 10 Ret 12 Ret 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX[lower-alpha 11]
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
Source:[152][153]

Template:WRC driver results legend Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Co-Drivers[edit source | edit]

Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX[lower-alpha 11]
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
1 France Julien Ingrassia 22 43 1 34 Ret 33 1 122
2 United Kingdom Scott Martin 34 1 4 42 14 44 293 114
3 Template:Country data EST Martin Järveoja Ret 24 2 13 172 61 22 105
4 Template:Country data BEL Nicolas Gilsoul 11 62 16 Ret 21 22 Ret 87
5 Template:Country data FIN Jonne Halttunen 5 31 5 51 43 Ret 5 80
6 Template:Country data FIN Janne Ferm 45 55 Ret 7 6 Ret 44 52
7 Template:Country data FIN Jarmo Lehtinen 83 8 3 6 Ret 5 Ret 44
8 Spain Carlos del Barrio Ret 15 35 42
9 Template:Country data IRL Paul Nagle 7 25 25
10 Monaco Daniel Elena 6 35 24
11 United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson 63 9 8 5 25 Ret 16
12 Template:Country data SWE Patrik Barth 15 6 15 8 10 10 14
13 United Kingdom Daniel Barritt 7 9 Ret Ret 201 13
14 Template:Country data FIN Mikko Lukka 10 11 8 8 9
15 Norway Anders Jæger-Amland 6 8
16 Poland Maciej Szczepaniak 14 Ret 7 9 14 8
17 Template:Country data IRL Aaron Johnston 25 17 Ret 9 18 7 8
18 Russia Yaroslav Fedorov 16 21 7 36 6
19 France Vincent Landais Ret Ret 7 6
20 Norway Torstein Eriksen 10 12 10 14 9 4
21 Italy Giovanni Bernacchini 8 Ret Ret 4
22 Template:Country data BEL Renaud Jamoul 15 18 13 9 Ret 49 2
23 France François-Xavier Buresi 9 Ret 2
24 Argentina Marcelo Der Ohannesian 14 10 11 16 1
25 Template:Country data SWE Jonas Andersson Ret 13 10 Ret 12 Ret 1
Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX[lower-alpha 11]
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
Source:[152][153]

Template:WRC driver results legend Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers[edit source | edit]

Only the best two results of each manufacturer at each rally are taken into account for the World Manufacturers’ Championship.

Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
1 South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 241
5 5 6 2 3 2 3
2 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2 1 1 3 1 3 1 236
3 3 4 4 4 4 5
3 United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT 4 4 3 5 5 5 4 129
6 6 5 6 6 7 Ret
4 France Hyundai 2C Competition Ret Ret 6 Ret 8
Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Template:Country data SWE
MEX
Mexico
EST
Template:Country data EST
TUR
Turkey
ITA
Italy
MNZ
Italy
Points
Source:[152][153]
Template:WRC driver results legend

Notes[edit source | edit]

  1. Rally1 cars were previously known as World Rally Cars and Rally2 cars were known as R5 before changes to the sporting regulations were introduced in 2020.[1]
  2. Tänak and Järveoja won their titles with Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT but left the team to join Hyundai for the 2020 championship.[4]
  3. Juha Kankkunen won four drivers' championships with three manufacturers, but he did not have the same co-driver each time.
  4. The Monte Carlo Rally is run on a tarmac and snow surface.
  5. The route of Rally Sweden was shortened from 301.26 km over 19 stages to 9 stages totalling 148.55 km. The route was shortened due to a lack of snow and bad weather conditions.[11]
  6. The route of Rally Mexico was shortened by 56.01 km.[13]
  7. 7.0 7.1 The running date of Rally Argentina was initially scheduled to hold between 30 April to 3 May.[22]
  8. Every crew that enters a World Rally Championship event—including World Rally Championship-2, World Rally Championship-3, Junior World Rally Championship and privateer entries—is eligible to score points in the World Championship for Drivers and the World Championship for Co-Drivers.
  9. The crew of Devidas Jocius and Mindaugas Varža competed with multiple numbers throughout the championship.[55][56][57]
  10. Citroën had previously announced that they would withdraw at the end of the 2021 championship, co-inciding with the planned introduction of hybrid powertrains. The planned withdrawal was attributed to Citroën's existing partnership with Formula E team Techeetah.[73]
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 The Power Stage was removed from the Rally Mexico route as the final leg was cancelled.[13]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Evans, David (8 October 2019). "FIA steps up plan to simplify WRC into five-tier career ladder". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  2. Barry, Luke (27 October 2019). "WRC Spain: Toyota's Tanak takes '19 title, Neuville wins for Hyundai". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  3. "Hyundai celebrates title". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 November 2019. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Tänak quits Toyota". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 31 October 2019. Retrieved 31 October 2019.
  5. Howard, Tom (12 November 2019). "UPDATE: Rally Australia cancelled due to bushfires". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  6. "Video: Ogier on the emotions of his seventh WRC title". dirtfish.com. 6 December 2020. Retrieved 7 December 2020.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Herrero, Daniel (27 September 2019). "Australia drops off WRC calendar in 2020". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Evans, David (27 September 2019). "WRC drops Corsica, Spain and Australia, three events return for 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 "Belgium's Ypres rally off as coronavirus numbers rise". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 30 October 2020. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  10. "88th Rallye Monte-Carlo". acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 "Green light for Rally Sweden". rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  12. "The race". rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Herrero, Daniel (15 March 2020). "Rally Mexico shortened by a day due to travel restrictions". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  14. "ItineraryMx20" (PDF). rallymexico.com. Rally Mexico. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  15. "Appendix 1 Timetable" (PDF). rallyestonia.com. Rally Estonia. Retrieved 25 July 2020.
  16. "Itinerary" (PDF). rallyturkey.com. Rally of Turkey. 17 August 2020. Retrieved 2 September 2020.
  17. "Itinerary". rallyitaliasardegna.com. Rally Italia Sardegna. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  18. "Itinerary". acirallymonza.com. Monza Rally Show. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  19. 19.0 19.1 "WRC Calendar". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  20. 20.0 20.1 "Events Calendar Season 2020". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Evans, David (29 November 2019). "WRC's 2020 Rally Chile cancelled due to political and social unrest". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 "Calendar changes confirmed". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 20 January 2020. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  23. "Itinerary" (PDF). rallyargentina.com. Rally Argentina. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  24. 24.0 24.1 Elizalde, Pablo (25 March 2020). "WRC 2020 season hit by more rally postponements due to coronavirus". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  25. "Programa". rallydeportugal.pt (in Portuguese). Rally de Portugal. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  26. 26.0 26.1 "Portugal WRC round called off". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 30 April 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  27. 27.0 27.1 "Rally Guide 1" (PDF). safarirally.co.ke. Safari Rally. p. Appendix I. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 Thukral, Rachit (15 May 2020). "WRC News: Kenya's Safari Rally cancelled due to coronavirus". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 16 May 2020.
  29. "Itinerary and route map". nesterallyfinland.fi. Rally Finland. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  30. 30.0 30.1 "No Neste Rally Finland for 2020". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 3 June 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 "New Zealand's 2020 WRC return off". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 4 June 2020. Retrieved 4 June 2020.
  32. 32.0 32.1 32.2 Craig, Jason (26 August 2020). "Rally Germany cancelled as Italian WRC round moves to avoid Imola F1 clash". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 26 August 2020.
  33. 33.0 33.1 Herrero, Dan (9 June 2020). "Rally GB cancelled". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  34. "Rally Guide 1" (PDF). rally-japan.jp. Rally Japan. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 Klein, Jamie (19 August 2020). "Belgium gets WRC round for the first time after Rally Japan axed". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 19 August 2020.
  36. "Belgium's Ypres Rally off as Coronavirus numbers rise". wrc.com. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  37. Craig, Jason; Klein, Jamie (30 October 2020). "WRC's Ypres Rally called off amid COVID-19 restrictions". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  38. "FIA announces World Motor Sport Council decisions". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 12 October 2018. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  39. Evans, David (8 April 2019). "FIA visits Japan and Kenya in next step for WRC returns in 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  40. Evans, David (2 July 2019). "Safari Rally could officially return in WRC calendar vote this week". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  41. "Safari back in 2020". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  42. "Three new rounds in 2020 WRC calendar". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  43. Evans, David (16 December 2019). "Rally Chile replacement call unclear, could be made during 2020 WRC". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  44. 44.0 44.1 "WRC sets return date". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 2 July 2020. Retrieved 2 July 2020.
  45. Ridge, Hal (16 June 2020). "Discussions ongoing over staging a WRC round in Latvia in 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  46. "Rally Estonia organizer: Estonian WRC round will be decided this week". err.ee. 29 June 2020. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  47. "WRC's Rally Turkey finalises September date change". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 31 July 2020. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  48. "New date confirmed for Italy's 2020 FIA WRC fixture". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 26 August 2020. Retrieved 26 August 2020.
  49. Evans, David (2 July 2020). "WRC reveals new calendar with Estonia restart". dirtfish.com. Retrieved 2 July 2020.
  50. Ridge, Hal (1 September 2020). "WRX to run alongside WRC at Spa as Belgium round moved to November". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 11 September 2020.
  51. "Belgium added to 2020 FIA World Rally Championship". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 19 August 2020. Retrieved 19 August 2020.
  52. Thukral, Rachit (9 October 2020). "Monza Rally to hold final round of season for WRC". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 October 2020.
  53. "Rally Monza to form 2020 FIA World Rally Championship finale". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 9 October 2020. Retrieved 9 October 2020.
  54. Evans, David (20 December 2019). "Pirelli wins tyre tender to supply WRC top tier and R5s from 2021". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  55. 55.0 55.1 55.2 "88e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo Entry List" (PDF). acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  56. 56.0 56.1 56.2 56.3 "Rally Sweden 2020 Entry List" (PDF). rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. 27 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  57. 57.0 57.1 57.2 "Rally Guanajuato Mexico 2020 Entry List" (PDF). rallymexico.com. Rally Mexico. 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  58. 58.0 58.1 "Rally Estonia 2020 Entry List" (PDF). rallyestonia.com. Rally Estonia. 3 September 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  59. "Rally Turkey 2020 Entry List" (PDF). rallyturkey.com. Rally of Turkey. 31 August 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  60. 60.0 60.1 "Rally Italia Sardegna 2020 Entry List". rallyitaliasardegna.com. Rally Italia Sardegna. 25 September 2020. Retrieved 28 September 2020.
  61. 61.0 61.1 "Rally Monza 2020 Entry List". acirallymonza.com. Monza Rally Show. 26 November 2020. Retrieved 26 November 2020.
  62. "Champ Ott shuns #1 at Hyundai". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  63. "2019 FIA World Rally Championship Sporting Regulations" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 12 December 2018. p. 22. Archived from the original on 27 July 2019.
  64. "Neuville signs new Hyundai deal". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 12 September 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  65. "Loeb joins Hyundai". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 December 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  66. "Sordo extends Hyundai contract". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 9 October 2019. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  67. 67.0 67.1 Evans, David (10 December 2019). "Hyundai could run second WRC team for exiles Breen, Mikkelsen". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 December 2019.
  68. Evans, David (27 January 2020). "Hyundai gives Breen "career lifeline" WRC Rally Sweden outing". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  69. "Breen named in Hyundai's Estonia line-up". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 23 July 2020. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  70. "Breen Receives Hyundai nod for Ypres". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 1 October 2020. Retrieved 1 October 2020.
  71. "Solberg and Mikkelsen to debut Porelli's WRC Tyres". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 28 September 2020. Retrieved 28 September 2020.
  72. Evans, David (20 November 2019). "Citroen ends WRC programme, cites Ogier's exit as reason". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  73. 73.0 73.1 Evans, David (15 November 2019). "Citroen won't be part of World Rally Championship hybrid era in 2022". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  74. Evans, David (3 December 2019). "Citroen's WRC cars could be bought or rented after its WRC exit for 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  75. "Toyota reveals 2020 line-up". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 November 2019. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  76. 76.0 76.1 Evans, David (29 November 2019). "Latvala could get five-round 2020 WRC deal in a Toyota Yaris". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  77. Klein, Jamie (14 December 2019). "Toyota hands Katsuta eight WRC starts for 2020". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  78. Evans, David; Benyon, Jack (14 January 2020). "Ex-WRC driver Haninen to co-drive for Latvala on 2020 Rally Sweden". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  79. Evans, David (6 December 2019). "Kris Meeke facing uncertain future after Toyota WRC exit". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 7 December 2019.
  80. Lillo, Sergio; Evans, David (9 January 2020). "Meeke accepts full-time WRC career is over, now exploring options". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  81. "Eight drivers, one seat". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 30 November 2019. Retrieved 7 December 2019.
  82. 82.0 82.1 Evans, David (2 January 2020). "Citroen WRC exile Lappi joins M-Sport alongside Suninen and Greensmith". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  83. "Loubet set for World Rally Car début". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 8 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  84. Benyon, Jack (28 January 2020). "Hyundai expands junior driver programme into WRC". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  85. "Veiby set for Monza World Rally Car debut". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 November 2020. Retrieved 28 November 2020.
  86. "2020 FIA World Rally Championship – Sporting regulations" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. p. 16-17. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  87. "Toyota's new Yaris stays silent". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  88. Thukral, Rachit; Rauli, Giacomo (13 July 2020). "WRC changes starting order rules for season return on shortened Rally Estonia". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 26 July 2020.
  89. "SS4/5: Evans leads, Tänak crashes". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  90. "Neuville fires early warning to Monte rivals". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  91. "Advantage Evans in Monte-Carlo Thriller". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 25 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  92. "Neuville seals revenge win in Monte-Carlo". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 26 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  93. "Preview – Rally Sweden". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 12 February 2020. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  94. "Martin celebrates maiden win". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 17 February 2020. Retrieved 21 February 2020.
  95. "Evans completes Rally Sweden". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 16 February 2020. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  96. 96.0 96.1 "How Rovanperä became a WRC record-breaker". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 18 February 2020. Retrieved 21 February 2020.
  97. Ramirez, Luis (14 March 2020). "WRC Rally Mexico to end early as more travel restrictions loom". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  98. 98.0 98.1 98.2 "Ogier extends Mexico advantage". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  99. "Friday morning: Ogier opens up early lead in Mexico". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  100. "Lappi and Ferm escape burning Fiesta". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  101. 101.0 101.1 "Ogier clinches victory in Mexico". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  102. "Brakes come off WRC hiatus in Estonia". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 29 August 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  103. Garton, Nick (4 September 2020). "Rally Estonia WRC: Tanak leads home event after shakedown as WRC returns". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  104. "Preview – Rally Estonia". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 3 September 2020. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  105. "Tänak dominates rally Estonia warm-up". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 August 2020. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  106. 106.0 106.1 106.2 "Tänak files to Estonia win despite late fright". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 6 September 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  107. "Tänak supreme on home roads in Estonia". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 5 September 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  108. "Neuville: "I'll keep fighting"". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 16 September 2020. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  109. "Rovanperä hit with minute penalty". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 5 September 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  110. "Watch: Katsuta's weekend comes to abrupt end". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 6 September 2020. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  111. "Katsuta pledges to bounce back from Estonia roll". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 8 September 2020. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  112. "Turkey countdown – Rally route". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 15 September 2020. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  113. "Veteran Loeb turns back clock to lead Rally Turkey". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 18 September 2020. Retrieved 19 September 2020.
  114. "Ogier leads in Turkey as Tänak's title hopes tumble". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 19 September 2020. Retrieved 19 September 2020.
  115. "Neuville on top at rally Turkey after dramatic Saturday". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 19 September 2020. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  116. "Evans snatches Turkey lead after crazy morning". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 20 September 2020. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  117. "Ogier's weekend comes to firey end". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 20 September 2020. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  118. 118.0 118.1 "Evans wins crazy Rally Turkey to regain WRC lead". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 20 September 2020. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  119. "Evans cool on title talk". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 22 September 2020. Retrieved 22 September 2020.
  120. "Challenge". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  121. Garton, Nick (10 October 2020). "WRC Rally Italy: Sordo retains Sardinia lead over Ogier". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  122. Craig, Jason (11 October 2020). "Sordo keeps Rally Italy win despite post-event WRC scrutiny failure". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  123. 123.0 123.1 "Sordo holds on for Sardinia double dramatic finale". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 11 October 2020. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  124. Saldias, Benjamin (12 October 2020). "Dani Sordo dominates Rally Italia Sardegna for the second year in a row". redbull.com. Red Bull GmbH. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  125. "Adamo proud of Hyundai's Italian job". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 12 October 2020. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  126. "Rovanperä to start despite Italy shakedown crash". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 8 October 2020. Retrieved 12 October 2020.
  127. "Sordo closes on repeat Sardinia victory". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 10 October 2020. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  128. 128.0 128.1 "Sordo storms to early Sardinia lead". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 9 October 2020. Retrieved 10 October 2020.
  129. "Snow expected to provide Saturday shake-up in Italy". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 3 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  130. "Ogier edges Neuville in Monza opener". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 3 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  131. "Watch: Neuville title hopes washed away". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 5 December 2020.
  132. "Ogier poised for seventh title after Evans' Monza heartbreak". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 5 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  133. "Breaking: Evans slides off, leaving title hopes in tatters". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 5 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  134. "Sordo snatches lead in Monza monsoons". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 5 December 2020.
  135. "Watch: Ogier's incredible SS3 run without vision". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  136. "Ogier clinches seventh title with Monza victory". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 6 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  137. Hansford, Rob (26 January 2020). "Rally Monte Carlo WRC: Neuville wins thrilling season-opener". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  138. "88. Rallye Automobile de Monte-Carlo 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  139. Brunsdon, Stephen (16 February 2020). "Rally Sweden WRC: Dominant Evans wins on second start for Toyota". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  140. "68. Rally Sweden 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  141. Garton, Nick (15 March 2020). "WRC Rally Mexico: Ogier takes maiden Toyota win in truncated rally". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  142. "17. Rally Guanajuato México 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  143. Garton, Nick (6 September 2020). "WRC Rally Estonia: Tanak takes home win and leads Hyundai 1-2". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 6 September 2020.
  144. "10. Rally Estonia 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  145. Garton, Nick (20 September 2020). "WRC Rally Turkey: Evans claims cautious victory in attritional final day". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  146. "13. Rally Turkey Marmaris 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  147. Garton, Nick (11 October 2020). "WRC Rally Italy: Sordo holds off Neuville, Ogier for victory". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  148. "17. Rally Italia Sardegna 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  149. Garton, Nick (6 December 2020). "WRC Rally Monza: Ogier clinches seventh WRC title with victory". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  150. "ACI Rally Monza 2020". e-wrc.com. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  151. "2017 WRC dates confirmed". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 28 September 2016. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  152. 152.0 152.1 152.2 "Championship standings 2020". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  153. 153.0 153.1 153.2 "Standings". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Retrieved 6 December 2020.

External links[edit source | edit]

Template:2020 World Rally Championship season Template:World Rally Championship results Template:World championships in 2020

Visibility[edit source | edit]

This page has been added to search engine indexes. learn more