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2021 in climate change

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List of years in climate change

This article documents notable events, research findings, effects, and responses related to global warming and climate change during the year 2021.

Summaries[edit source | edit]

Measurements and statistics[edit source | edit]

Events and phenomena[edit source | edit]

Actions and goal statements[edit source | edit]

Science and technology[edit source | edit]

Political, economic, cultural actions[edit source | edit]

  • A 5 January run-off election in the U.S. state of Georgia placed the Democratic party in narrow control of both houses of Congress, improving Democratic President Biden's prospects for implementing climate-related policies.[1]
  • On 15 January, France's Total SE—among Europe’s top energy companies that had accelerated plans to cut emissions and build large renewable energy businesses—became the first major global energy company to quit the American Petroleum Institute lobby group, whose largest members resisted investor pressure to diversify to renewables.[2]
  • On 20 January, on the afternoon of his inauguration, U.S. President Joe Biden signed a letter re-committing the nation to the 2015 Paris climate accord,[3] reversing Donald Trump's withdrawal that took formal effect on 4 November 2020.[4] The U.S. had been the only country in the world not signatory to the accord.[3]
  • 1–12 November: the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26, Glasgow, Scotland) had been postponed for a year because of the COVID-19 pandemic.[5]

Mitigation goal statements[edit source | edit]

Adaptation goal statements[edit source | edit]

Projections[edit source | edit]

  • In January, the World Economic Forum listed top 10 risks by likelihood (extreme weather as #1, climate action failure as #2, human environmental damage as #3) and by severity (climate action failure as #2, human environmental damage as #6, extreme weather as #8).[6]

Significant publications[edit source | edit]

  • Fleming, Sean (19 January 2021). "These are the world's greatest threats in 2021". WEForum.org. World Economic Forum. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021.


See also[edit source | edit]


References[edit source | edit]

  1. Eilperin, Juliet; Dennis, Brady; Mufson, Steven (7 January 2021). "How the Georgia election results just raised Biden's climate ambitions". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021.
  2. Bousso, Don (15 January 2021). "France's Total quits top U.S. oil lobby in climate split". Financial Post. Reuters. Archived from the original on 16 January 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Beitsch, Rebecca (20 January 2021). "Biden recommits US to Paris climate accord". The Hill. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021.
  4. Arvin, Jariel (6 November 2020). "Europe's leaders on climate change are the first to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden". Vox. Archived from the original on 29 November 2020.
  5. "Uniting the World to Tackle Climate Change". ukCOP26.org. U.N. Climate Change Conference 2021. Archived from the original on 3 January 2021.
  6. Fleming 2021.

External links[edit source | edit]

Organizations[edit source | edit]

Surveys, summaries and report lists[edit source | edit]

Template:Climate change Template:Human impact on the environment

Visibility[edit source | edit]

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