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2023 FIFA Women's World Cup

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Template:Infobox international football competition

The 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup is scheduled to be the 9th edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football championship contested by 32 national teams representing member associations of FIFA. The tournament will be held in Australia and New Zealand, during a reserved period in the FIFA Women's International Match Calendar between 10 July and 20 August 2023.[1]

In July 2019, FIFA president Gianni Infantino proposed an expansion of the Women's World Cup from 24 to 32 teams, possibly starting with the 2023 edition, as well as doubling the tournament's prize money.[2] On 31 July 2019, the FIFA Council unanimously decided to expand the tournament to 32 teams, featuring eight groups of four.[3] The United States is the defending champion.

Host selection[edit source | edit]

On 19 February 2019, FIFA announced that bidding had begun for the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup.[4] Member associations interested in hosting the tournament had to submit a declaration of interest by 15 March 2019, and provide the completed bidding registration by 16 April 2019. However, as the tournament expanded to 32 teams on 31 July 2019, FIFA revised the bidding timeline.[3] Other member associations interested in hosting the tournament now had until 16 August 2019 to submit a declaration of interest, while the completed bidding registration of new member associations and re-confirmation of prior bidders had to be provided by 2 September 2019.[5]

Initially, nine countries indicated interest in hosting the events: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Japan, South Korea (with interest in a joint bid with North Korea), New Zealand and South Africa.[6] Following the new deadline, Belgium expressed interest in hosting the tournament, but later dropped out with Bolivia in September 2019.[7][8] Australia and New Zealand later announced they would merge their bids in a joint submission.[9] They were joined by Brazil, Colombia, and Japan in submitting the bid books to FIFA by 13 December 2019.[10] However, both Brazil and Japan later withdrew their bids in June 2020.[11][12]

On 25 June 2020, Australia and New Zealand officially won the bid to host the Women's World Cup.[13] The decision came after a vote by the FIFA Council, with the winning bid earning 22 votes, while Colombia earned 13.[14] Neither country had previously hosted a senior FIFA tournament. This will be the first Women's World Cup to be hosted in multiple countries, and only the second World Cup tournament to do so, following the 2002 FIFA World Cup. It will also be the first FIFA Women's World Cup held in the southern hemisphere, the first senior FIFA tournament to be held in Oceania, and the first FIFA tournament to be hosted across multiple confederations (with Australia in the AFC and New Zealand in the OFC). Australia is the second association from the AFC to host the Women's World Cup, after China in both 1991 and 2007.

Qualification[edit source | edit]

Australia and New Zealand automatically qualified for the tournament as co-hosts. Qualifying matches are scheduled to start in 2021 and end in 2022.

On 9 December 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency handed Russia a four-year ban from all major sporting events, after RUSADA was found non-compliant for handing over manipulated lab data to investigators.[15] This decision was followed by all instances of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), who also reflects in FIFA, who has some members as working together with the entity. However, this decision is not yet valid for continental bodies, who allow the use of their national symbols on your events. This situation is very similar to what happened in the period before the 2018 Winter Olympics when IOC allowed the participation of some athletes previously selected and who had previously tested negative for doping under the banner as Olympic Athletes from Russia. Russian participation is still uncertain at this time since FIFA has yet to comment or take a decision about the topic.[16] The decision is pending appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.[17]

Qualified teams[edit source | edit]

The following teams qualified for the final tournament.

Team Qualified as Qualification date Appearance
in finals
Consecutive
streak
Previous best performance
Template:Fbw Hosts 25 June 2020 8th 8 Quarter-finals (2007, 2011, 2015)
Template:Fbw Hosts 25 June 2020 6th 5 Group stage (1991, 2007, 2011, 2015, 2019)

Venues[edit source | edit]

The following host cities, venues and capacities were included in the Bid Book submitted to FIFA:[18]

  • A cross denotes an indoor stadium.
Template:Country data AUS Australia
Sydney Brisbane Melbourne
Stadium Australia Sydney Football Stadium Brisbane Stadium Melbourne Rectangular Stadium
Capacity: 70,000 Capacity: 42,512 Capacity: 52,263 Capacity: 30,052
Sydney-Galaxy-homebush.jpg 150px Suncorpstadium071006a.JPG AAMI Park 2015 AFC Asian Cup Iran v Bahrain.jpg
Newcastle Perth Launceston Adelaide
Newcastle Stadium Perth Oval York Park Hindmarsh Stadium
Capacity: 25,945 Capacity: 22,225 Capacity: 22,065 Capacity: 18,435
Ausgrid Stadium.jpg Nib Stadium.jpg Gunns Stand.jpg Hindmarsh Stadium Panorama from Away End, October 2016.jpg

Australia Lua error in Module:Location_map/multi at line 27: Unable to find the specified location map definition: "Module:Location map/data/Australia" does not exist.

New Zealand Lua error in Module:Location_map/multi at line 27: Unable to find the specified location map definition: "Module:Location map/data/New Zealand" does not exist.

New Zealand New Zealand
Auckland Wellington Dunedin Hamilton Christchurch
Eden Park Wellington Regional Stadium Dunedin Stadiumdagger Waikato Stadium Rugby League Park
Capacity: 48,276 Capacity: 39,000 Capacity: 28,744 Capacity: 25,111 Capacity: 22,556
Eden Park with statue.jpg All Whites v Peru 11 November 2017.jpg Dunedin Forsyth Barr Stadium.JPG Hamilton 03.jpg Addington Rugby Stadium.jpg

Broadcasting rights[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

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  18. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  19. "FIFA extending TV deals through 2026 World Cup with CTV, TSN and RDS". The Globe and Mail. 12 February 2015.
  20. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  21. Parker, Ryan. "2026 World Cup TV rights awarded without bids; ESPN 'surprised'". Los Angeles Times. 13 February 2015.

External links[edit source | edit]

Template:2023 FIFA Women's World Cup Template:FIFA Women's World Cup