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7

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Template:Infobox number/link Template:Infobox number/link Template:Infobox number/link
-1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Cardinalseven
Ordinal7th
(seventh)
Numeral systemseptenary
Factorizationprime
Prime4th
Divisors1, 7
Greek numeralΖ´
Roman numeralTemplate:Roman
Roman numeral (unicode)Ⅶ, ⅶ
Greek prefixhepta-/hept-
Latin prefixseptua-
Binary1112
TernaryTemplate:Ternary
QuaternaryTemplate:Quaternary
QuinaryTemplate:Quinary
SenaryTemplate:Senary
Octal78
Duodecimal712
Hexadecimal716
VigesimalTemplate:Vigesimal
Base 36736
Greek numeralZ, ζ
Amharic
Arabic, Kurdish, Persian٧
Sindhi, Urdu۷
Bengali
Chinese numeral七, 柒
Devanāgarī
Telugu
Tamil
Hebrewז
Khmer
Thai
Kannada

7 (seven) is the natural number following 6 and preceding 8. It is a prime number, and is often considered lucky in Western culture.

Evolution of the glyph[edit source | edit]

In the beginning, various Hindus wrote 7 more or less in one stroke as a curve that looks like an uppercase J vertically inverted. The western Ghubar Arabs' main contribution was to make the longer line diagonal rather than straight, though they showed some tendencies to making the character more rectilinear. The eastern Arabs developed the character from a 6 lookalike into an uppercase V lookalike. Both modern Arab forms influenced the European form, a two-stroke character consisting of a horizontal upper line joined at its right to a line going down to the bottom left corner, a line that is slightly curved in some font variants. As is the case with the European glyph, the Cham and Khmer glyph for 7 also evolved to look like their glyph for 1, though in a different way, so they were also concerned with making their 7 more different. For the Khmer this often involved adding a horizontal line above the glyph.[1] This is analogous to the horizontal stroke through the middle that is sometimes used in handwriting in the Western world but which is almost never used in computer fonts. This horizontal stroke is, however, important to distinguish the glyph for seven from the glyph for one in writings that use a long upstroke in the glyph for 1. In some Greek dialects of early 12th century the longer line diagonal was drawn in a rather semicircular transverse line.

Digital77.svg

On the seven-segment displays of pocket calculators and digital watches, 7 is the number with the most common glyph variation (1, 6 and 9 also have variant glyphs). Most calculators use three line segments, but on Sharp, Casio, and a few other brands of calculators, 7 is written with four line segments because, in Japan, Korea and Taiwan 7 is written as ① in the illustration to the right.

While the shape of the 7 character has an ascender in most modern typefaces, in typefaces with text figures the character usually has a descender, as, for example, in TextFigs078.svg.

Hand Written 7.svg

Most people in Continental Europe,[2] and some in Britain and Ireland as well as Latin America, write 7 with a line in the middle ("7"), sometimes with the top line crooked. The line through the middle is useful to clearly differentiate the character from the number one, as the two can appear similar when written in certain styles of handwriting. This glyph is used in official handwriting rules for primary school in Russia, Ukraine, Bulgaria, Poland, other Slavic countries,[3] France, Italy, Belgium, Finland,[4] Romania, Germany, Greece,[5] and Hungary.[6][failed verification]

Mathematics[edit source | edit]

Seven, the fourth prime number, is not only a Mersenne prime (since 23 − 1 = 7) but also a double Mersenne prime since the exponent, 3, is itself a Mersenne prime. It is also a Newman–Shanks–Williams prime,[7] a Woodall prime,[8] a factorial prime,[9] a lucky prime,[10] a happy number (happy prime),[11] a safe prime (the only Mersenne safe prime), and the fourth Heegner number.[12]

In fact, if one sorts the digits in the number 142,857 in ascending order, 124578, it is possible to know from which of the digits the decimal part of the number is going to begin with. The remainder of dividing any number by 7 will give the position in the sequence 124578 that the decimal part of the resulting number will start. For example, 628 ÷ 7 = 89+5/7; here 5 is the remainder, and would correspond to number 7 in the ranking of the ascending sequence. So in this case, 628 ÷ 7 = 89.714285. Another example, 5238 ÷ 7 = 748+2/7, hence the remainder is 2, and this corresponds to number 2 in the sequence. In this case, 5238 ÷ 7 = 748.285714.
Graph of the probability distribution of the sum of 2 six-sided dice

Basic calculations[edit source | edit]

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 15 25 50 100 1000
7 × x 7 Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num Template:Num
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15
7 ÷ x 7 3.5 2.3 1.75 1.4 1.16 1 0.875 0.7 0.7
0.63 0.583 0.538461 0.5 0.46
x ÷ 7 0.142857 0.285714 0.428571 0.571428 0.714285 0.857142 1 1.142857 1.285714 1.428571
1.571428 1.714285 1.857142 Template:Num 2.142857
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
7x 7 49 Template:Num 2401 16807 117649 823543 5764801 40353607 282475249
x7 1 Template:Num 2187 16384 78125 279936 823543 2097152 4782969 Template:Num
Radix 1 5 10 15 20 25 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
110 120 130 140 150 200 250 500 1000 10000 100000 1000000
x7 1 5 137 217 267 347 427 557 1017 1147 1307 1437 1567 2027
2157 2317 2447 2607 3037 4047 5057 13137 26267 411047 5643557 113333117

See also[edit source | edit]

Notes[edit source | edit]

  1. Georges Ifrah, The Universal History of Numbers: From Prehistory to the Invention of the Computer transl. David Bellos et al. London: The Harvill Press (1998): 395, Fig. 24.67
  2. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  3. "Education writing numerals in grade 1." Archived 2008-10-02 at the Wayback Machine(Russian)
  4. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  5. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  6. "Example of teaching materials for pre-schoolers"(French)
  7. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  8. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  9. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  10. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  11. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  12. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).
  13. Bryan Bunch, The Kingdom of Infinite Number. New York: W. H. Freeman & Company (2000): 82
  14. Lua error in ...ribunto/includes/engines/LuaCommon/lualib/mwInit.lua at line 23: bad argument #1 to 'old_ipairs' (table expected, got nil).

References[edit source | edit]