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Boeing Orbital Flight Test 2

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Boe-OFT 2
Spacecraft 2 in preparation.jpg
Spacecraft 2 in preparation for OFT-2
Mission typeTest flight
Operator
Mission duration8 days (planned)
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftBoeing Starliner Spacecraft 2
ManufacturerBoeing
Start of mission
Launch dateNET October 2020[1]
RocketAtlas V N22
Launch siteCape Canaveral SLC-41
End of mission
Landing siteWhite Sands Missile Range
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric
RegimeLow Earth
Inclination51.6
Berthing at ISS
Berthing portHarmony or Unity
Boe-CFT →
 
← Boe-OFT
Boe-CFT →

The Boeing Orbital Flight Test 2 (also known as Boe-OFT 2) is a planned repeat of the Boeing's first Orbital Flight Test that was plagued with software problems. The mission will test the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, built by Boeing as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The mission is planned to last eight days, involving a rendezvous and docking with the International Space Station (ISS), followed by landing in the western United States. This is the first planned docking of Starliner after the December 2019 flight failed to rendezvous with the station due to an anomaly with the spacecraft's mission elapsed time (MET) clock. The mission is planned to use the hardware, Starliner, and Atlas V that was planned for the crewed flight test.

On 6 April 2020, Boeing announced that they would redo the Orbital Flight Test to prove and meet all of the test objectives. A four-month investigation of the first Orbital Flight Test resulted in Boeing proposing another uncrewed flight test of the spacecraft's systems. NASA accepted the proposal from Boeing to do another uncrewed test flight at no cost to the American taxpayers.

The cost for the second flight is an estimated $410 million and it is scheduled for launch no earlier than October 2020.[1][2]

Payload[edit source | edit]

Mission[edit source | edit]

The second Atlas V N22, designated AV-082, will launch the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its second uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station. The capsule is intended to dock with the space station, then return to Earth to land in the Western United States after an orbital shakedown cruise ahead of Boeing Crewed Flight Test.[citation needed]

OFT 2 is the second flight of an Atlas V without a payload fairing and with a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. The dual-engine Centaur utilizes two RL10s and is required for Starliner flights in order to provide a launch trajectory that allows for a safe abort at any point in the mission.[3]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Davenport, Christian (6 April 2020). "After botched test flight, Boeing will refly its Starliner spacecraft for NASA". The Washington Post. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  2. @BoeingSpace (2020-04-06). "We've decided to fly a second Orbital Flight Test because we are committed to the safety of those who design, build and ultimately will fly on #Starliner. Read the full statement here: boeing.mediaroom.com/2020-04-06-Boe..." (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  3. "Starliner arrives at launch pad in major pre-flight milestone". NASASpaceFlight.com. 2019-11-21. Retrieved 2019-12-17.

External links[edit source | edit]

Template:Starliner spaceflights Template:Unmanned ISS flights Template:Orbital launches in 2020

Visibility[edit source | edit]

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