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COVID-19 pandemic in Malta

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COVID-19 pandemic in Malta
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationMalta
Arrival date7 March 2020
(11 months, 3 weeks and 2 days)
OriginWuhan, Hubei, China
Confirmed cases720[1]
Active cases46[1]
Recovered665[1]
Deaths
9[1]
Official website
covid19malta.info

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the first case of coronavirus disease in Malta was an Italian 12-year-old girl on 7 March 2020. The girl and her family were in isolation, as required by those following the Maltese health authority's guidelines who were in Italy or other highly infected countries.[2] Later, both her parents were found positive as well. As of 29 July 2020, Malta has reported 720 confirmed cases, 665 recoveries and 9 deaths; 46 cases remain active.[3]

A mandatory quarantine was imposed on travellers and those who were possibly in contact with those who travelled abroad. A mandatory lockdown was imposed on those over the age of 65 and/or suffering from chronic health conditions.[4] WHO praised the Maltese government's response to the pandemic,[5] before the number of cases rose to 52 on 7 April. On May Day, given that the reproductive rate of the virus was below 0, the first relaxation of some measures were announced.[6]

Background[edit source | edit]

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019.[7][8]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003,[9][10] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll.[11][9]

History[edit source | edit]

Health and precautions[edit source | edit]

Queues at a supermarket on 24 February

On 24 January, the Superintendent for Public Health, Charmaine Gauci, predicted low exposure due to no direct flights between Malta and China.[12]

On 24 February, the health authorities announced that all passengers arriving in Malta were to be screened by thermal cameras; two thermal scanning devices were installed in Malta International Airport. Passengers disembarking from vessels at the Grand Harbour and catamaran terminal in Marsa were also scanned. At Mater Dei Hospital, all patients with respiratory symptoms were checked for COVID-19.[13]

On 25 February, the Ministry for Health recommended travellers coming from Italy to self-quarantine for 14 days and for all citizens not to travel to regions of Italy affected by the outbreak.[14][15] As the Italy coronavirus pandemic proceeded south with the first case discovered in Palermo, panic buying ensued and supermarkets were emptied.[16][17]

Maltese chandlers and ship workers refused to board vessels from Italy to unload cargo, unless they were provided supervision and clearance by medical doctors.[18] The Malta Union of Teachers recommended members not to accept any homework from students who were unwell and requested students and teachers who visited countries affected by the virus to stay home.[19]

Some work places requested their staff who recently returned from Italy to work from home as well as deferred non-essential travels to Italy.[20]

On 11 March, a travel ban has been placed on trips to Germany, France, Spain and Switzerland, in addition to the ban on trips to Italy. Additionally anyone travelling back from mentioned countries must follow a mandatory self-quarantine. Disobeying the order makes the individuals subject to a €1,000 fine.[21]

Hunting controversy[edit source | edit]

Most activities have been banned in Malta; violators may be fined for public health risks. government has allowed the opening of the hunting season. Nevertheless, the Public Health Superintendent left the decision to open the hunting season to a government-set committee, which allowed it. This increased pressure on police and health authorities.[22] Several illegal activities relating to hunting were reported with no police presence. As soon as police were informed of individual illegal activities, the individuals were tipped off and left the scene with protected birds in non-hunting protected zones.[23] In the midst of the pandemic, the Cabinet at Castille has discussed with the hunting lobby with closed door over sealing off permanently natural reserves from the public and allow only access to registered hunters.[24]

Measures for containment[edit source | edit]

”Stay Home” banner promoted by children, and the display of the flag of Malta as promoted by organisations and the government

On 11 March, Prime Minister Robert Abela announced a ban on all sea and air travel (except for cargo) and a mandatory quarantine on travellers returning from the most infested countries of France, Germany, Switzerland and Spain from that day onwards, together with Italy, for which it applied for the previous 14 days. Infringements were to be penalised with a €1,000 each time.[25]

On 12 March, the Prime Minister announced a number of measures including:

  1. closure of all schools, university and childcare centres for a week;
  2. closure of day centres for the elderly;
  3. stop religious activities unless absolutely necessary;
  4. television channel TVM2 will be transmitting religious activities in agreement with the Archbishop;
  5. all football games to be played behind closed doors. Other matches were been postponed;
  6. No political activities.[26]

As of 13 March, mandatory quarantine was extended to travellers returning from any country. This was also published on the Malta Tourism Authority's and Air Malta's websites.[27][28][29]

Following reports from spot checks, Malta tripled its mandatory quarantine fine to €3,000 each time since 16 March.[30] Later on in the evening, Abela informed the nation that all gyms, bars and restaurants would temporarily close. Food and Beverage outlets were to be allowed to operate only if they were offering take away and/or delivery service.[31]

On March 22, Health Minister Chris Fearne announced three more measures:[32]

closure of non-essential retail (fashion, appliances, electronics) closure of non-essential services (hairdressers, nail salons, beauticians, spas) banning of all organised group gatherings. Any infringements were to be charged with a €3,000 fine each time.[28]

In the evening of March 23, the Maltese government raised the fine for those infected up to €10,000.[33][34]

On March 28, the government has announced decisions related to education institutions and exams. These include:[citation needed]

Schools and educational institutions will be closed until the end of the scholastic year. Online teaching is being used for continuity. The SEC examinations (ordinary levels) will not be held in the session beginning on the 23rd of April. MATSEC will then issue a certificate to successful students, showing whether Level 2 or Level 3 was reached based on performance and mid-year mock exams. This certificate will be instrumental in deciding whether to allow students to progress further education. Intermediate and A Level exams will be held in September 2020.

First case till local transmission[edit source | edit]

March 2020[edit source | edit]

On 7 March, Malta reported its first three cases of coronavirus: an Italian family consisting of a 12-year-old girl and her parents, who arrived in Malta on 3 March from Rome after a holiday in Trentino. The girl was the first case, with the parents testing positive for the coronavirus later in the day. They had been in self-quarantine since arriving from Italy, and they are now[when?] held in isolation at Mater Dei Hospital.[35]

As of 8 March 2020, 540 tests have been carried out. This includes all those who were in contact with the infected family. Other than the family, all tested negative. Reports of other cases were dismissed as dissemination of false information.[36] A further 10 people were tested on 9 March with one result reported positive in the evening, bringing the overall number to four cases.[37] The man did not follow quarantine regulations for the first two days, which caused outrage among those possibly affected.[38] His daughter was found also positive, becoming the fifth case.[39] The fourth and fifth cases were reported as being Norwegians living in Malta.[citation needed]

In the morning of 11 March, the sixth case of COVID-19 was confirmed with the patient being a Maltese man coming back from Italy. That same evening, the 7th case was confirmed and the patient was a relative of his who had travelled with him to Italy.[40][41]

Origin of COVID-19 infections in Malta[lower-alpha 1]
Imported  Italy 9
 Spain 3
 France 2
 UK 2
 Norway 3
 Ireland 1
Unspecified South America 1
Unknown 0
Total imported 18+
Communal 2nd degree[lower-alpha 2] 55+
3rd degree[lower-alpha 3] 5+
Unknown link[lower-alpha 4] 1
Total communal 45+
Undetermined[lower-alpha 5] 1
TotalTemplate:Needs update 720[42]

In the morning of 12 March, the 8th and 9th cases of the COVID-19 were confirmed.[43]

By midday of 13 March 889 tests had been carried out in Malta and consequently three further cases of COVID-19 were announced, bringing the total to 12.[44] All cases were imported from abroad. The 10th case was a Maltese man, 45, who returned from Münich on 6 March, the 11th case is an Italian man, 40, who returned from Paris on 6 March, and the 12th case was a Maltese woman, 30, who returned from Brussels on 9 March.[45] Later in the day, the first recovery form the virus in Malta was reported.[citation needed]

As of 14 March there were 18 cases.[46]

On 15 March, three further cases of SARS-CoV-2 were reported in Malta, bringing the total to 21.[47] In total 1,385 tests had been carried out, split between 722 tests on people who came from abroad and showed symptoms, and 663 tests on people who did not go abroad but displayed some sort of symptoms.[48]

On 13 and 15 March, the first and second cases recovered from the COVID-19 coronavirus in Malta. The two individuals were to remain under quarantine in view of the revelations that the virus can re-emerge within survivors.[49] [50]

On 16 March, Malta's COVID-19 cases have risen to 30 with nine new cases being recorded overnight, Public Health Superintendent Charmaine Gauci said on Monday. Three of the cases were local transmission after people who came from holidays abroad infected co-workers. The three local transmissions were healthcare professionals, who contracted the virus from other healthcare workers who tested positive after returning from holiday.[51]

The imported cases are of a 56-year-old Maltese woman who returned from the UK, a 34-year-old Maltese man who was on holiday in Barcelona with another person who had tested positive, a 15-year-old Spanish boy who was stopped at the airport with a group of friends, who are now in quarantine, a 49-year-old Italian woman who lives in Malta and whose husband returned from Rome, a 39-year-old man from the UK who lives in Malta and a 19-year-old Maltese teenager who was with the same group that returned from Dublin and who tested positive in previous days.[51] Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/Malta medical cases chart At noon, on 17 March, in a press briefing, the Maltese health authorities confirmed 8 further cases of the COVID-19, bringing the total to 38.[52]

Of these last 8 cases, two were in contact with other people with coronavirus, four returned from abroad but put themselves into quarantine after their arrival to Malta, one of them work together with someone who was returning from Italy but who was not presenting symptoms, and the last one is unsure where he could get the virus because he did not travel and was not in contact with anybody with the virus. They found out that this last case was going to the gym, and he could have gotten it there.[53]

At midday on 18 March, ten new cases were reported, including, for the first time, two patients aged over 70. All the patients are doing well.[54][55]

On 19 March, only five new cases were reported.[56]

At noon, on 20 March 11 new cases of coronavirus patients were reported. These included the case of a 61-year-old man, who was the first Maltese case of a COVID-19 patient who developed complications of the infection.[57][58][59]

On 21 March, nine new cases were reported. These cases were an Indian national, 30, residing in Malta; unemployed, no travel history: he was in contact with a travel-related case, a Maltese woman, 49, who had contact with another person already positive with coronavirus contracted through travel. She reported symptoms on 19 March; two household members live with her, A school worker, she last worked there on 2 March. No risk of contagion for those who worked with her, a Maltese migrant to Australia who went into self-quarantine after travelling here from London also reported fever. Households members are under quarantine, a 25-year-old Maltese woman who returned from the UK to Malta. She then went into self-quarantine on her own in an apartment. Consequently, contact-tracing of those on the flight home was done. A Maltese national, 55, with no travel history and no symptomatic contacts, reported symptoms 14 March with fever and muscle pain. He worked on 13 March, a day before symptoms emerged. Contact tracing ongoing, a woman whose relative reported being ill after returning from England. She reported symptoms on 19 March. She last reported attending university on 10 March. This case was contained and controlled by the authorities, with household members also being tested. A foreign national in Malta, 41, who was not in contact with people living abroad was also amongst those reported, yet there is no clear indication of how this local transmission occurred. Contact tracing of workmates was being actioned. A Somali person who works in Malta, 44 years old, who flew to Brussels between 15 and 18 March, reported fever and chest pain. He reported to Mater Dei the day before after being in self-quarantine since he returned to Malta.[60]

On 22 March, seventeen new cases were reported. 10 of the 17 cases were believed to be related to travel, while the other 7 were believed to be locally transmitted. Among the patients were an 18-year-old Maltese woman and a 37-year-old Maltese man, both of whom travelled to the UK; a 50-year-old Swedish man and 22-year-old Maltese man, whom both travelled to northern Italy; a Hungarian youth who is believed to have contracted the virus from his father; a 24-year-old Finnish youth who travelled to Vienna; a 51-year-old Maltese man who travelled to Morocco; a woman who travelled to Belgium, as well as a 46-year-old Maltese woman and another woman whose partner works in the tourism industry and is believed to have transmitted the virus to her. Among the seven other cases are a 27-year-old Maltese healthcare worker. There is also a 74-year-old man, a 60-year-old Maltese woman, a 42-year-old Indian individual and a 28-year-old Somali man. A number of patients have already been sent home, where they will self-quarantine for two weeks before they were to be tested again for the virus.[61]

On 23 March, another seventeen new cases were reported.[62]

On 24 March, three new cases were reported.[63]

On 25 March, nineteen new cases were reported.[64]

On 26 March, five new cases were reported.[65]

On 27 March, five new cases were reported and a total of 4662 tests have been carried out.[66][67]

On 28 March, Chris Fearne announced ten new cases in a press conference.[68]

On 29 March, Charmaine Gauci reported two new cases were during the daily update.[69]

On 30 March, five new cases were reported.[70]

On 31 March, thirteen new cases were reported.[71]

April 2020[edit source | edit]

On 1 April, nineteen new cases were reported, Five being transmitted from abroad.[72]

On 2 April, seven new cases were reported. Another case was counted with the previous day already.[73]

On 3 April, seven new cases were reported. The Health Ministry is alerted that one of the infected lives at the Har Far Open Centre for refugees.[74]

On 4 April, eleven new cases were reported.[75]

On 5 April, fourteen new cases and three recoveries were reported. As the most infected are African immigrants living in one single place, alarms of massive contagion has been alerted. This has prompted the government to lock down the reception centre in Ħal Far, where eight cases were found positive in an area that accommodates around 1,000 people packed together.[76]

On 6 April, another fourteen new cases were reported. All cases are local transmission, with the majority being foreigners and some linked to previous cluster and expected spread among immigrants living in crowded conditions.[77] One infected immigrant has supposedly fled from the police while being escorted to hospital.[78] However, this was the result of missing understanding as the person went back to the centre where he was receiving treatment by the Red Cross. He was later transferred to Boffa Hospital in Floriana.[78] Other immigrants at the centre were forcefully locked-in indefinitely (until coronavirus remains present) and safeguarded by the armed forces.[79] The situation is considered more desperate as residents inside the facility have to share bathrooms.[80] Two elderly people in a relationship were escorted to Malta from nearby offshore in a joint cooperation by the military and health authorities. They were required to stay in obligatory quarantine.[81] The first Maltese person to die took place in the UK, and it is not counted with the national statistics of Malta.[82] Meanwhile, amidst the Holy Week, the Archbishop played the harmonica.[83]

On 7 April, the Minister for Health has announced in an unusual early televised update that over 52 cases were found positive. Several more could be positive and over 300 people could be positive at this point.[84] This was the highest spike of cases in Malta.[85]

On 8 April six more cases were reported. Later on during the day, in a press-conference held by the Minister for Health & Superintendent of Public Health, the first death caused by COVID-19 was announced. The victim was a 92-year-old woman from Gozo.[86] During Dissett, a TVM programme, Health Minister Chris Fearne announced that 11 more people had recovered from COVID-19, bringing the total recoveries to 16.[87]

In the morning, 9 April, the Health Minister announced that there are 32 cases, 11 recoveries and a second patient has died due to COVID-19, a 79-year-old man.[88]

On 10 April, thirteen new cases were reported.[89]

On 11 April, twenty new cases were reported and a third COVID-19 patient died, the patient was a 84-year-old man admitted into Mater Dei Hospital on 10 April.[90]

Parish church in Qormi was empty during Easter Sunday, due to the Coronavirus

On 12 April, Minister for Health, Chris Fearne announced that another 28 patients recovered from COVID-19 in Malta, bringing the total to 44 along with 8 new cases.[91]

On 13 April, six new cases were reported.[92]

On 14 April, nine new cases were reported.[93]

On 15 April, six new cases were reported.[94]

On 16 April, thirteen new cases and thirty eight recoveries were reported. On this day, the geographical distribution of residence of cases was revealed, with the most populous Northern Harbour District being the most affected.[95]

On 17 April, ten new cases and nine recoveries were reported.[96]

On 18 April, four new cases and eight recoveries were reported.[97]

On 19 April, one new case and nineteen recoveries were reported.[98][99]

On 20 April, four new cases and eight recoveries were reported.[100]

On 21 April, twelve new cases and twenty four recoveries were reported. A possibility of a second wave was mentioned.[101]

On 22 April, one new case and fifteen recoveries were reported.[102]

On 23 April, one new case and thirty-nine recoveries were reported.[103] It was also reported that the reproduction rate of the virus had become below 1.[104]

On 24 April, two new cases and nineteen recoveries were reported.[105]

Ice-cream shop advising customers to be open for take-aways only

On 25 April, one new case and twenty-six recoveries were reported and a fourth patient has died due to COVID-19, a 96-year-old woman.[106]

On 26 April, no new cases and thirty-three recoveries were reported.[107]

On 27 April, two new cases and four recoveries were reported.[108]

On 28 April, eight new cases and seventeen recoveries were reported.[109]

On 29 April, five new cases and thirty-six recoveries were reported.[110]

On 30 April, two new cases and twelve recoveries were reported.[111][112]

May 2020[edit source | edit]

On May Day, Charmaine Gauci reported that two new cases and sixteen recoveries were reported. During the joint press conference, Robert Abela and Chris Fearne announced the relaxing of measures, mainly the re-opening of non-essential retail outlets, albeit with social distancing rules, as well as travel between Malta and Gozo. Certain hospital services that were sidelined for focus on the pandemic would resume.[113][114][115][116][117][118][119]

On May 2, one new case and twelve recoveries were reported.[120][121]

On May 3, nine new cases and thirteen recoveries were reported from 1,071 within the last 24 hours. Total tests was 35,012 [122]

On May 4, three new cases and seven recoveries were reported.[123]

On May 5, two new cases and four recoveries were reported, from and 1,218 swab tests. The two new cases include a fifth victim that died due to COVID-19, an 81-year-old man who died overnight.[124][125]

On May 6, two new cases and four recoveries were reported.[126]

On May 7, two new cases and six recoveries were reported. Total tests for the previous 24 hours were 1,022.[127]

On May 8, three new cases and six recoveries were reported.[128][129]

On May 9, one new case and eight recoveries were reported.[130]

On May 10, six new cases and six recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 11, seven new cases and one recovery were reported. The new cases included a 48-year-old mother who showed symptoms on the 9 May and her two-year-old daughter who showed symptoms on May 8. A cluster of three people related to the three cases identified on Sunday. Two, aged 47 and 24 are both healthcare workers who work in the same ward. The third is a 26-year-old woman who has not displayed any symptoms. A 30-year-old woman was swabbed with her partner. He did not test positive. A 41-yer-old healthcare worker at Karin Grech, who was identified through random testing. She did not show any symptoms.[citation needed]

On May 12, three new cases were reported.[citation needed]

On May 13, two new cases and two recoveries were reported and a sixth patient has died due to COVID-19, a 53-year-old man who is a doctor.[citation needed]

On May 14, fourteen new cases and seven recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 15, ten new cases and five recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 16, fourteen new cases and two recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 17, seven new cases and four recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 18, five new cases and two recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

On May 19, eleven new cases and four recoveries were reported.[citation needed]

People keeping social distancing outside a bakery store

On May 20, fifteen new cases and five recoveries were reported. Malta has now 113 active cases. 1670 swab tests were carried out, bringing the total of swab tests to 54866.[131]

On May 21, fifteen new cases and three recoveries were reported. Malta has now 125 active cases. 1358 swab tests were carried out in the past 24 hours resulting in the total of 56224 swab tests carried out since the beginning of the pandemic.[132]

On May 22, one new case and one recovery were reported. Malta remains at 125 active cases. 1560 swab tests were carried out, a total of 57784 since the beginning on the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 23, nine new cases and four recoveries were reported. Malta has now 130 active cases. 1727 swab tests were carried out, resulting in a total of 59511 since the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 24, one new case and three recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 128 active cases. 1301 swab tests were carried out, a total of 60812 since the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 25, one new case and nine recoveries were reported. Malta has now 120 active cases. 803 swab tests were carried out, a total of 61615 overall.[citation needed]

On May 26, no new cases and no recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 120 active cases. 1472 swab tests were carried out, a total of 63087 overall.[citation needed]

On May 27, a 7th patient has passed away due to COVID-19. He was a 97-year-old man who was diagnosed on May 17 and was receiving treatment at Karin Grech Hospital. He had serious underlying medical conditions. This comes exactly two weeks after the 6th coronavirus death has been reported.[133] Later in the day in a briefing one new case and six recoveries were reported. Malta has now 114 active cases, 1247 swab tests were carried out, a total of 64334 from the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 28, four new cases and ten recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 108 active cases. 1137 swab tests were carried out, a total of 65471 since the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 29, no new cases and thirteen recoveries were reported and 2 patients had died due to COVID-19, a 56-year-old man and a 68-year-old man who both had various chronic conditions, bringing the total of deaths to 9. A total of 1193 swab tests were carrier out, bringing the number of total tests since the start of the pandemic to 66664.[citation needed]

On May 30, two new cases and eleven recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 84 active cases. 1374 swab tests were carried out, a total of 68038 since the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

On May 31, no new cases and nine recoveries were reported. Malta has now 75 active cases. 987 tests were carried out in the last 24 hours, a total of 69025 since the beginning of the pandemic.[citation needed]

June 2020[edit source | edit]

On June 1, one new case and three recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 73 active cases. 597 swab tests were carried out, a total of 69622 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 2, one new case and seventeen recoveries were reported. Malta has now 57 active cases. 1071 swab tests were carried out, a total of 70693 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 3, two new cases and eight recoveries were reported. Malta has now 51 active cases. 1030 swab tests were carried out, a total of 71723 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 4, no new cases and fourteen recoveries were reported. Malta has now 37 active cases. 892 tests were carried out in the last 24 hours, a total of 72615 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 5, three new cases and seven recoveries were reported. Malta has now 33 active cases. 977 swab tests were carried out, a total of 72992 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 6, two new cases and thirteen recoveries were reported. Malta has now 22 active cases. 877 swab tests were carried out, a total of 74469 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 7, two new cases were reported. Malta has now 24 active cases. 905 swab tests were carried out, a total of 75374 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 8, one new case was reported. Malta has now 25 active cases. 507 swab tests were carried out, a total of 75881 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 9, two new cases and one recovery were reported. Malta has now 26 active cases. 1152 swab tests were carried out, a total of 77033 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 10, three new cases were reported. Malta has now 29 active cases. 851 swab tests were carried out, a total of 77884 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 11, five new cases and three recoveries were reported. Malta has now 31 active cases. 904 swab tests were carried out, a total of 78788 since the beginning of the pandemic. Also, All cases reported today form part of the same cluster of thirteen cases.

On June 12, five new cases were reported including one in the Intensive Therapy Unit of Mater Dei Hospital. Malta has now 36 active cases. 1121 swab tests were carried out, a total of 79909 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 13, one new case and one recovery were reported, However the new case was isolated. All the tests carried out in relation to contact tracing of yesterday's cases were negative. Malta still remains 36 active cases. 1044 swab tests were carried out, a total of 80953 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 14, three new cases and two recoveries were reported. Malta has now 37 active cases. 1310 swab tests were carried out, a total of 82263 since the beginning of the pandemic. Also, All 3 cases reported today form part of a previous cluster which is now seventeen cases.

On June 15, one new case was reported which is sporadic. Malta has now 38 active cases. 554 swab tests were carried out, a total of 82817 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 16, six new cases and five recoveries were reported. Two of the cases reported today form part of a cluster while the other four are sporadic cases. Malta has now 39 active cases. 1236 swab tests were carried out, a total of 84063 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 17, six new cases and two recoveries were reported. One of the cases reported today is part of a formed cluster which has reached 19 cases while the other five are sporadic cases, four of which are symptomatic. Malta has now 43 active cases. 911 swab tests were carried out, a total of 84964 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 18, one new case was reported which is sporadic and symptomatic. Malta has now 44 active cases. 860 swab tests were carried out, a total of 85824 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 19, no new cases and three recoveries were reported. The 12 COVID-19 positive patients are receiving care in hospitals. 1 patient is in Mater Dei, 7 are at Saint Thomas Hospital and 4 are at Boffa Hospital. Malta remains at 41 active cases. 852 swab tests were carried out, a total of 86676 overall.

On June 20, one new case and three recoveries were reported. The sporadic symptomatic case was presented at casualty. Malta remains at 39 active cases. 786 swab tests were carried out, a total of 87462 overall.

On June 21, one new case was reported which is sporadic and symptomatic. Malta has now 40 active cases. 768 swab tests were carried out, a total of 88230 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On June 22, no new cases and one recovery was reported. Out of the total recovered cases, the most recovered are male and the rest female. Malta remains at 39 active cases. 464 swab tests were carried out, a total of 88694 overall.

On June 23, no new cases and one recovery was reported. Malta remains at 38 active cases. 927 swab tests were carried out, a total of 89621 overall.

On June 24, no new cases and six recoveries were reported. This marks the first time that there were no new cases in three consecutive days since 7 March 2020. The eleven COVID-19 positive patients are still receiving care in hospitals, five are in St. Thomas Hospital, three are in Boffa Hospital, two are in Mater Dei Hospital and the other one is in Karin Grech Hospital. Malta remains at 32 active cases. 923 swab tests were carried out, a total of 90544 overall.

On June 25, three new sporadic cases and three recoveries were reported. Two of the new cases are asymptomatic while the other one is symptomatic. Malta still remains at 32 active cases. 1027 swab tests were carried out, a total of 91571 overall.

On June 26, two new cases (one asymptomatic while the other one is symptomatic) and five recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 29 active cases. 946 swab tests were carried out, a total of 92517 overall.

On June 27, no new cases and three recoveries were reported. The seven COVID-19 positive patients are still receiving care in hospitals, three are in Boffa Hospital, two are in St. Thomas Hospital, one in Mater Dei Hospital and one is in Karin Grech Hospital. Malta remains at 26 active cases. 870 swab tests were carried out, a total of 93387 overall.

On June 28, no new cases and one recovery was reported. Malta remains at 25 active cases. 661 swab tests were carried out, a total of 94048 overall.

On June 29, no new cases and three recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 22 active cases. 516 swab tests were carried out, a total of 94564 overall.

On June 30, no new cases and one recovery was reported. This marks the first time that there were no new cases in four consecutive days since 7 March 2020. Malta remains at 21 active cases. 567 swab tests were carried out, a total of 95131 overall.

July 2020[edit source | edit]

On July 1, one new case which is sporadic and symptomatic and seven recoveries were reported. Malta has now 15 active cases. 1135 swab tests were carried out, a total of 96266 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 2, no new cases and two recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 13 active cases. 892 swab tests were carried out, a total of 97158 overall.

On July 3, one new case which is an imported sporadic and symptomatic case and one recovery were reported. Malta remains at 13 active cases. 981 swab tests were carried out, a total of 98139 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 4, no new cases and one recovery was reported. For the first time since March, There aren't any COVID-19 patients receiving care in Mater Dei Hospital. However, four patients are in Boffa Hospital, one in St. Thomas Hospital and the other one is in Karin Grech Hospital. Malta remains at 12 active cases. 987 swab tests were carried out, a total of 99126 overall.

On July 5, no new cases and one recovery was reported. Malta remains at 11 active cases. 771 swab tests were carried out with an extra 2040 swab tests added to reflect the total amount of tests carried out before March, a total of 101937 overall.

On July 6, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 11 active cases. 457 swab tests were carried out, a total of 102394 overall. 42228 also used the COVID-19 symptoms checker.

On July 7, one new case which is an imported case and one recovery were reported. The new case was imported through a repatriated foreigner living in Malta. Malta remains at 11 active cases. 930 swab tests were carried out, a total of 103324 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 8, no new cases and one recovery was reported. The three COVID-19 positive patients are still receiving care in hospitals, two patients are in St. Thomas Hospital, one in Boffa Hospital. Malta remains at 10 active cases. 775 swab tests were carried out, a total of 104099 overall.

On July 9, one new local, sporadic and asymptomatic case and two recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 9 active cases. 809 swab tests were carried out, a total of 104908 overall.

On July 10, no new cases and two recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 7 active cases. 775 swab tests were carried out, a total of 105683 overall.

On July 11, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 7 active cases. 742 swab tests were carried out, a total of 106425 overall.

On July 12, no new cases and two recoveries were reported. Malta remains at 5 active cases. 741 swab tests were carried out, a total of 107116 overall.

On July 13, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 5 active cases. 456 swab tests were carried out, a total of 107622 overall.

On July 14, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 5 active cases. 931 swab tests were carried out, a total of 108553 overall.

On July 15, no new cases and one recovery was reported. This marks the first time that there were no new cases in six consecutive days since 7 March 2020. Malta remains at 4 active cases. 985 swab tests were carried out, a total of 109538 overall.

On July 16, no new cases were reported. This marks the first time that there were no new cases in a week since 7 March 2020. Malta still remains at 4 active cases. 1087 swab tests were carried out, a total of 110625 overall.

On July 17, no new cases and one recovery was reported. Malta remains at 3 active cases. 930 swab tests were carried out, a total of 111555 overall.

On July 18, one new imported case was reported. The person affected experienced symptoms days after returning to Malta from abroad. Contact tracing is underway. Malta remains at 4 active cases. 848 swab tests were carried out, a total of 112403 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 19, one new case was reported. Contact tracing is now being carried out. Malta remains at 5 active cases. 834 swab tests were carried out, a total of 113237 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 20, one new case which is a close contact of a previous case and two recoveries were reported. Malta has now 4 active cases. 583 swab tests were carried out, a total of 113820 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 21, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 4 active cases. 959 swab tests were carried out, a total of 114779 overall.

On July 22, two new sporadic cases (one symptomatic and the other asymptomatic) and one recovery were reported. Malta remains at 5 active cases. 1016 swab tests were carried out, a total of 115795 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 23, one new local, sporadic and symptomatic case was reported. Malta remains at 6 active cases. 1114 swab tests were carried out, a total of 116909 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 24, six new cases were reported. They form part of a cluster related to yesterday's case. 4 tests resulted positive that morning. Malta remains at 12 active cases. 931 swab tests were carried out, a total of 117840 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 25, no new cases were reported. Malta still remains at 12 active cases. 1085 swab tests were carried out, a total of 118925 overall.

On July 26, fourteen new cases were reported. Malta remains at 26 active cases. 1220 swab tests were carried out, a total of 120145 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 27, one new case was reported which forms part of the same cluster of cases. Malta remains at 27 active cases. 850 swab tests were carried out, a total of 120995 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 28, seven new symptomatic cases (including two imported) were reported. They form part of a cluster related to Friday's case. Malta remains at 34 active cases. 1353 swab tests were carried out, a total of 122348 since the beginning of the pandemic.

On July 29, twelve new sporadic cases were reported. Two of them form part of a cluster related to Friday's case and the other five cases were related to The feast of St. Venera. Also 66 positive cases form part of the disembarked migrants in Malta the previous day. Malta has now 46 active cases according to disputed [134] official figures. 1615 swab tests were carried out, a total of 123963 since the beginning of the pandemic.

Statistics[edit source | edit]

As of 19 May 2020.[1]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

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External links[edit source | edit]