A cup of hot tea to welcome you!


Welcome to Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.
WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

A cup of hot tea to welcome you!

Welcome to Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions. Aimed at WAP ZERO to the sum of all knowledge.


WAP is made by people like you, sign up and contribute.

COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Ireland

From Wikiafripedia, the free encyclopedia that you can monetize your contributions or browse at zero-rating.
Jump to navigation Jump to search

COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Ireland
DiseaseCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Virus strainSevere acute respiratory syndrome
coronavirus 2
(SARS-CoV-2)
LocationNorthern Ireland
First caseBelfast
OriginChina
Confirmed cases6,556 (as of 20th August 2020)[1]
Recovered1,522 (as of 20th August 2020)[1]
Deaths
Official website
Northern Ireland Department of Health

The COVID-19 pandemic reached Northern Ireland on 27 February 2020. According to the Department of Health, 559 people have died after testing positive for coronavirus. [1] The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency reports 859 people have died (see Statistics).[2] Northern Ireland has the lowest recorded coronavirus death rate in the United Kingdom and a lower rate than the Republic of Ireland.[3] It is also carrying out more tests per capita than the other countries of the United Kingdom.[4] According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, the vast majority of deaths linked to COVID-19 were among over-75s and almost half were in care homes. It is believed the infection rate is higher in care homes than in the community, which is inflating the overall rate.[citation needed]

As in the rest of the UK, all "non-essential" travel and contact with people outside one's home (including family and partners) is restricted for the whole population, and almost all businesses, venues, facilities, amenities and places of worship are shut. Major events such as Saint Patrick's Day were cancelled. A lengthy lockdown is forecast to severely damage the economy and lead to a large rise in unemployment.

The health service worked to raise hospital capacity. In mid-April, modelling by the Department of Health indicated that the health service in Northern Ireland could cope with the expected peak in cases.[5] On 21 April, Northern Ireland's chief scientific advisor said the curve of new cases had flattened, and evidence suggests Northern Ireland had passed the peak of its outbreak.[6] Template:TOC-limit

Timeline[edit source | edit]

Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/Northern Ireland medical cases chart

February 2020[edit source | edit]

The HSC began testing for COVID-19 during February 2020, as of 19 February there were 35 completed tests all of which returned negative results.[7] On 27 February, the HSC confirmed that the first presumptive case had been discovered in Northern Ireland in a woman who had returned from Italy, the case was sent to the Public Health England reference laboratory where it was confirmed as Northern Ireland's first case on 29 February.[8][8]

March 2020[edit source | edit]

Cases continued to rise throughout early March with cases rising to seven by the end of the first week.[9] On 9 March Belfast City Council voted to cancel the annual St Patrick's Day parade in the city.[10] By the end of the second week the HSC started to advise people showing symptoms to isolate for seven days, cases had also jumped to 45 by 15 March.[11] On St Patrick's Day, parades across all of Northern Ireland had been cancelled as cases reached 52.[12]

On 19 March, Northern Ireland recorded its first death from COVID-19, with cases reaching 77.[13][14] Reacting to the news, First Minister Arlene Foster said "This is a sad day for Northern Ireland. Our thoughts and prayers are first and foremost with the family and friends of the patient who has died. And we are immeasurably grateful to our health service staff who cared for this person. This is not unexpected news. We knew that this pandemic would inevitably cost precious lives. We cannot stop it. But it is incumbent on all of us to do whatever we can to slow its spread and shield those most vulnerable from the effects of this virus."[14] On 22 March, a second person died from the coronavirus, with cases rising to 128.[15]

On 20 March, the UK Government announced measures to further tackle the spread of the virus which included closing bars, restaurants, gyms and many other social venues.[16]

Also on 20 March the UK Government announced a Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, were it would offer grants to companies to pay 80% of a staff wage each month up to a total of £2,500 per a person, if companies kept staff on their payroll. The scheme would cover three months' wages and would be backdated to the start of March.[17] Later in March the Self Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS) was announced.[18] The scheme paid a grant worth 80% of self employed profits profits up to £2,500 each month, on companies who's trading profit was less than £50,000 in the 2018-19 financial year or an average less than £50,000 over the last three financial tax years for those who suffered a loss of income. Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC) were tasked with contacting those who were eligible and the grant was taxable.[citation needed]

Cases confirmed by 20 March were 86 in total.[19]

On 21 March, Northern Ireland suffered its largest increase in new cases to date with 22 new cases confirmed.[20] On 22 March, a second person died from the virus.[15]

A third victim died from COVID-19 on 23 March, followed by two more deaths on 24 March.[21][22] On 25 March, the largest increase in new cases to date was recorded as cases rose by 37 to 209, with 2 new deaths also being confirmed.[23] Speaking at a press conference on 25 March, Northern Ireland's Chief Medical Officer Dr Michael McBride said he believes the actual figure of cases to be "many thousands" and testing would increase to approximately 1000 new tests everyday.[24]

On 26 March, a further 3 people died from the virus with 32 new confirmed cases.[25] On 27 March, 34 new cases and 3 new deaths were confirmed, with leading GPs in Northern Ireland writing an open letter calling for a complete lockdown, stating "Please hear and act on our heartfelt plea and move to adopt a 'complete lockdown' as we have seen in other countries, at the earliest opportunity. Time is of the essence.".[25] On 28 March, Northern Ireland experienced the highest rate of increased new cases yet with 49 new cases, and a further 2 deaths.[26]

Electronic display sign normally used for traffic management displays COVID-19-related advices on an almost deserted Chichester Street in Belfast City Centre, 24 March.

On the evening of the 28 March the Northern Ireland Executive announced new stricter measures to combat the spread of the virus. Measures included:[citation needed]

  • The ability to force businesses to shut and crack down on people who leave their homes without a "reasonable excuse".
  • Penalties, ranging from fixed penalty notices to fines of up to £5,000, are being introduced as enforcement.
  • Anyone who can work from home must work from home
  • Employers must facilitate working from home where it is feasible
  • No employer should compel an employee to come to work if it is feasible to work from home
  • Every employer must take all reasonable steps to safeguard the health, safety and wellbeing of employees during the COVID-19 emergency, whether working from home or in the workplace
  • Every employer must have particular regard to the safety of employees in the workplace and must put into effect the guidance on social distancing issued by the Department for the Economy
  • Every employer has a legal duty to ensure, so far as it is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all employees
  • Where a business is failing to observe the Department for the Economy guidance and breaching the legal duty on health and safety, the statutory authorities will take robust action, which may include prosecution for criminal offences
  • Where necessary, the Executive Office will also use its power of direction to close or restrict businesses that do not ensure the safety of their employees.

Commenting on the new measures, Arlene Foster said "We are asking the people of Northern Ireland to make fundamental changes to how they live their lives. But we are doing this to keep you safe, to flatten the curve of the Covid-19 infection so that the health service has the capacity to deal with those who need their help the most." Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill also commented "Each one of us has a personal responsibility to do everything we can to fight back against Covid-19 for the good of everyone across society. We will use every power we have to ensure people stay at home so that we save as many lives as we possibly can."[27][28][29]

On 29 March, new cases announced by the Public Health Agency were 86 and 6 new deaths, the highest for both in a single day to date.[30]

Following the announcement on 31 March that there were 53 new cases and 6 new deaths, the totals at the end of the month of March were 586 confirmed cases and 28 deaths.[31]

April 2020[edit source | edit]

A deserted A1 on the outskirts of Newry during lockdown on 4 April.

On 1 April, a further 103 cases and 2 deaths were confirmed as Health Minister Robin Swann warned that 3000 people could die in the first wave of the pandemic.[32] On 2 April, 85 more cases and 6 more deaths were reported, bringing the total number of confirmed cases and deaths to 774 and 36 respectively.[33] On 3 April, the largest increase in deaths and cases to date was published by the Public Health Agency with 130 cases and 12 deaths, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 904 and the number of deaths to 48.[34]

On 4 April, a further 94 new cases and 8 new deaths were announced, as Northern Ireland's first coronavirus testing centre for healthcare workers opened at the SSE Arena, Belfast.[35] Health Minister Robin Swann said the new testing facility in Belfast “will allay some of the concern and speculation we have had of late. I fully understand the frustration that we have not been able to scale up testing numbers more quickly. This is not down to a lack of will or action. There are significant challenges including laboratory and staffing capacity and the unprecedented levels of global demand for testing reagents and swabs.”[36]

It was reported that more than 33,000 people so far had claimed unemployment benefits since the lockdown began, ten times the normal rate. Economists forecast that a lengthy lockdown and disruption would lead to hundreds of thousands of job losses.[37]

On 5 April, an additional 91 cases and 7 deaths were reported, bringing the total number of cases and deaths to 1,089 and 63 respectively.[38]

On 6 April, the Orange Order announced that the annual 12th July celebrations were cancelled, as a further 69 cases and 7 deaths were confirmed.[39] A further 97 cases and 3 deaths were announced by the Public Health Agency on 7 April, as a second drive-through testing centre opened at an MOT centre in Belfast.[40] With Easter weekend approaching, on 8 April, the Police Service of Northern Ireland warned people against visiting local beauty spots, as the death toll increased to 78 with 5 more deaths and 84 new cases being reported.[41]

The tower at Belfast City Hospital has been converted to a field hospital.

A further 4 deaths and 138 cases were confirmed on 9 April as experts predicted a deep recession in Northern Ireland following the crisis.[42][43] Research by the Northern Ireland Assembly Library found that Northern Ireland has a lower coronavirus death rate per capita than the other countries of the United Kingdom, and a lower death rate than the Republic of Ireland.[3] It was also revealed that Northern Ireland has a higher coronavirus testing rate per capita than the other countries of the United Kingdom.[4]

On 10 April, a further 10 deaths and 112 cases were reported, bringing the totals to 92 deaths and 1,589 cases.[44]

On 11 April, 15 more deaths and 128 new cases were confirmed as Health Minister Robin Swann called on the Army for assistance in fighting the disease.[45] New cases increased by 89 to 1806, and deaths by 11 to 118 on 12 April.[46] On 15 April, 6 more people died of the virus and another 121 cases were confirmed, as lock-down measures were extended for another three weeks with Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill warning against complacency stating, "Our biggest danger in this period is complacency. The measures are showing positive results but if we relax our behaviour, we will be in danger." [47]

On 15 April, Arlene Foster, the First Minister of Northern Ireland, extended the period of lockdown in Northern Ireland to 9 May, as 121 new cases and 6 new deaths were confirmed.[48] Modelling by the Department of Health indicated that Northern Ireland had reached the peak of its outbreak, and that the health service in Northern Ireland could now cope with the expected peak in cases. Swann said that the peak "may now, potentially, be less severe than we had feared".[5]

On 20 April, the Department of Health launched a new website that provides daily statistic updates, such as information on hospital admissions and discharges, bed occupancy and a breakdown of case and death numbers by age and gender. Speaking about the launch, Health Minister Robin Swann said, "It is vitally important to keep the public well informed. That includes the publication of statistics, as well as the all-important advice on how we keep ourselves and are loved ones safe." [49] The new website also confirmed that 2,307 COVID-19 patients had been discharged from hospital by 20 April.[50]

On 21 April, Northern Ireland's chief scientific advisor said the rising curve of new cases had flattened in Northern Ireland, and evidence suggests Northern Ireland had passed the peak of its outbreak. He said that the number of cases could fall to a low level by mid-May if social distancing rules are obeyed until then.[6]

On 23 April, the First Minister, Arlene Foster, said Northern Ireland may be able to ease its lockdown sooner than other parts of the UK. She said that easing restrictions will depend when public health criteria are met, rather than on a timetable. The Health Minister said "it's important we take our scientific guidance based on the science that is applicable to Northern Ireland".[51]

As the death toll increased to 338 on 29 April, Health Minister Robin Swann committed to maximum transparency with regards to statistics regarding the COVID-19 outbreak, stating “I want to continue seeing the maximum possible transparency on this issue. I want to explore with NISRA if it is possible for it to report more frequently than once a week on deaths associated with Covid-19 across hospitals and the community. This is not straightforward and I want to thank all those who are working hard in this area to provide up to date and reliable statistics.” [52]

Following the announcement on 30 April that there were 73 new cases and 9 new deaths, the totals at the end of the month of April were 3536 confirmed cases and 347 deaths.[53]

On 30 April, the UK Statistics Authority wrote to the Permanent Secretary, Richard Pengelly stating there were gaps in the data and daily time series have been lost since the statistics began to be released through DoH news releases. It was further reported that daily surveillance statistics should be released in a transparent, easily accessible and orderly way.[54]

May 2020[edit source | edit]

The new slogan "We all must do it to get through it" adopted by the NI Executive in May 2020

On 1 May, a further 18 deaths linked to COVID-19 were announced – 4 of the deaths happened in the past day (from the morning of 30 April until the morning of 1 May).[55] On 5 May fourteen deaths were announced in the same care home in Glengormley, County Antrim.[56]

On 7 May, the Northern Ireland Executive met to discuss a roadmap to ending lockdown restrictions, with an announcement due during the week beginning 11 May.[57] However, despite working on this roadmap, at the time Arlene Foster and Michelle O'Neill warned against easing restrictions in early May as the infection rate was still too high. Ms O'Neill stated, "We're still in the response stage, we're still in the fightback against Covid-19, but we're also in the space where we're planning for the recovery and that's the light at the end of the tunnel that we know everybody wants to be able to see." [58] Based on this evidence, the NI Executive extended the lockdown in Northern Ireland by a further three weeks until 28 May.[59] It was reported that the infection rate is higher in care homes than in the community, which is inflating the overall infection rate.[60]

On 8 May, the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) reported 516 deaths linked to COVID-19 up to and including 1 May. It reported that almost half of the deaths were in care homes and that three-quarters of the deaths were among the over 75s.[61]

NI Executive roadmap to exiting lockdown
NI Executive roadmap to exiting lockdown

On 12 May, the Northern Ireland Executive announced a roadmap for Northern Ireland to exit lockdown safely. The plan consists of five stages which are set to start at the end of full lockdown which is expected at the end of May. The plan does not have specific dates as it is fully dependent on how low the R rate is at every stage.[62]

Speaking about the roadmap, First Minister Arlene Foster said: “We recognise how difficult the current restrictions are. But those restrictions, and the determined people of Northern Ireland who have adhered to them, have saved lives and continue to do so. We don't want to keep any restriction in place any longer than we have to, but in relaxing any measure we must be cognisant of the potential effects in the transmission of the virus and our ability to save lives.[citation needed]

The Executive's recovery strategy sets out a pathway for us to emerge from lockdown in the safest way possible. This will require a series of judgements and decisions as we move forward. These decisions will be evidence-based, taking account of our unique circumstances here in Northern Ireland. As we embark on our phased recovery, we will remain focused on the health and wellbeing of our population; the impacts on our society; and our economy as a whole. Above all else, our priority will be saving lives.[citation needed]

Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill said:

"We don't underestimate the impact that the severe restrictions have had on everyone across our society. While they are still absolutely necessary, it is important that we give people hope for the future. Today we have set out our pathway for future recovery which gives an indication of how the restrictions on different aspects of life may be eased at various stages. The incremental five-step approach reflects the risk-based judgements we will make at each stage. These decisions will be evidenced by medical and scientific advice and benchmarked against our guiding principles and international best practice. The Executive's strategy is not time-bound because it's vital that we retain the flexibility needed to respond to the complex emerging situation based on all relevant evidence. Our recovery from Coronavirus will require a real partnership effort with the community. We are appealing to the public to please be patient. Keep adhering to the restrictions, follow the public health advice and stay at home. We will keep you updated every step of the way when we are in a position to slowly and carefully move out of lockdown.[63][64]

On 18 May, the Northern Ireland Executive activated some aspects of step one with garden and recycling centres allowed to open. However, on the same day, it was announced that further measures of step one would be activated on Tuesday 19 May such as groups of up to six people who do not share a household being able to meet outside and private church services being allowed.[65]

On 26 May, the Department of Health announced that there were zero deaths in the previous 24 hours, the first time since 18 March.[66] On 29 May NISRA announced that there were 716 deaths from all sources up to 22 May[67]

At the end of May, there were a total of 4716 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Northern Ireland with 523 deaths.[68]

June 2020[edit source | edit]

Deaths and cases continued to drop at the start of June, as the Health Minister announced an £11.7 million support package for care homes in Northern Ireland, which includes funding for sick pay for staff.[69]

For the first time since lockdown, there were zero deaths recorded from 6 June to 9 June and then from 13 June to 14 June. The Executive announced further easing of lockdown measures with all non-essential retail allowed to reopen from 12 June.[70] The Health Minister also announced a new ID card for support carers which allows them to access stores during priority shopping hours.[71]

On 15 June, the Executive announced more lockdown easing this time focusing on the hospitality industry with hotels, restaurants and bars that sell food or have a large beer garden being allowed to open from 3 July 2020.[72] On 16 June the NI Statistics and Research Agency announced that unemployment in Northern Ireland had doubled between the months of March and May due to COVID-19 restrictions.[73] On 18 June it was announced that from 6 July other services such as hairdressers and barbers are allowed to open.[74]

StopCOVID NI app, the contact tracing app for COVID-19 in Northern Ireland

On 20 June, there were no confirmed cases in the previous 24 hours for the first time since the first week of March.[75] From 23 June it was permitted for 6 people to meet indoors, maintaining social distancing and no overnight stays. On 25 June is was announced that Northern Ireland would be reducing its 2-metre social distancing rule to 1 metre.[76]

At the end of June, there were a total of 5,760 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Northern Ireland, with 551 deaths.[77]

July 2020[edit source | edit]

One 2 July First Minister Arlene Foster called on her deputy, Michelle O'Neill, to resign following her attendance at the funeral of Bobby Storey. Foster says she cannot "stand beside" O'Neill and "give out public health advice" after she attended the gathering of 120 people, breaking Northern Ireland government restrictions that say no more than 30 people should attend a funeral.[78]

As concerns about increasing unemployment grow, on the 6 July the UK government announced a £111m scheme to help firms in England provide an extra 30,000 trainee places; £21m will be provided to fund similar schemes in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.[79]

July saw a flood of relaxation of COVID-19 rules with betting shops, private clubs, restaurants, museums, and tourist sites opening on 3 July with salon and close contact services on 6 July. 10 July saw indoor gyms, outdoor playgrounds, weddings and baptisms, bingo and cinemas and competitive sports behind closed doors allowed. Libraries and indoor leisure centres followed.[80] On 10 July the wearing of face coverings became compulsory on public transport in Northern Ireland, exceptions will be for those with a medical condition, children under the age of 13, and on school transport.[81]

On 18 July research conducted by Ulster University indicated that an estimated 240,000 to 280,000 jobs could be at risk under two-metre social distancing regulations and that reducing it to one metre could save up to 30,000 jobs.[82] On 22 July the Public Health Agency says it has identified 16 clusters of COVID-19 involving 133 cases since its contact-tracing system began operating.[83]

On 30 July the Department of Health released its contact tracing app called StopCOVID NI. [84] On 31st July the advice which advised people who are high risk to shield from the public was paused, allowing them to stop self-isolating. [85]

At the end of July, there were a total of 5,948 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Northern Ireland, with 556 deaths.[86]

August 2020[edit source | edit]

On 5 August cases in Northern Ireland passed six thousand. [87] On 6 August 43 new cases were announced by the Public Health Agency, the highest daily increase since the middle of May. [88] On the same day the Executive announced that face coverings will become mandatory from the 10 August and also the reopening of pubs that do not serve food has been postponed until 1 September. [89]

Again, on the same day, it was announced that all pupils will return to school five days a week as normal at the start of term time in September. Education Minister Peter Weir announced that years 1 to 10 will return to class in protected bubbles, with minimised movements between classes for years 11 to 14. [90]

On 20 August the Executive announced that some restrictions were to be reintroduced following rising cases in recent days. Restrictions announced included reducing indoor gatherings from 10 to six people and outdoor meetings from 30 to 15. On the same day the PSNI announced that they would be focusing enforcement on hot spots around Northern Ireland to stop the spread of COVID-19. [91]

Field hospitals[edit source | edit]

In mid-March, HSC Northern Ireland started planning to open a COVID-19 field hospital similar to those being introduced in England. The tower block of Belfast City Hospital was chosen as the first such facility, with 230 beds and staff from around the nation.[92][93] The same report also stated that First Minister Arlene Foster had revealed that a Nightingale hospital could be based at the Eikon Exhibition Centre in Balmoral Park, and that the Department of Health was assessing its potential as a second Nightingale facility in preparation for a possible second wave later in 2020.[92]

On 13 May, it was announced that the Nightingale facility at Belfast City Hospital was to close temporarily but could be opened up again in the event of a second wave.[94]

Statistics[edit source | edit]

On 25 June the Department of Health announced that they will no longer be updating their statistics dashboard at weekends.

The official death toll from the Department of Health and Public Health Agency counts those who have died within 28 days of a COVID-19 diagnosis, whether or not it was the cause of their death. It mostly consists of hospital deaths, but also includes coronavirus-positive deaths in care homes and the community that are reported by the health service. The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency gives a higher death toll, as it also counts "suspected cases" where COVID-19 was mentioned on the death certificate but no test was done.[95]

Confirmed cases and deaths[edit source | edit]

Cases are likely to be higher as statistics are based on positive test results. The BBC states that death toll is 70% higher than reported.[96]

Confirmed cases[edit source | edit]

Deaths (Department of Health)[edit source | edit]

Deaths (Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency)[edit source | edit]

Weekly figures released from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency cover all fatalities in which coronavirus has been recorded on the death certificate. The weekly period runs from Friday to Thursday. [97]

Hospitalisations[edit source | edit]

All information about hospitalisations comes from the Department of Health dashboard.

Inpatients with confirmed COVID-19[edit source | edit]

Intensive care & ventilated patients with confirmed COVID-19[edit source | edit]

The Department of Health dashboard only has information from the start of April on ICU patients. From July to 9 August there was no information for weekends.

Dates and sourcing[edit source | edit]

Cases and deaths below are those that are reported from the media and Department of Health on those specific dates, which is reflected in the sources, however these numbers can be changed retrospectively on the Department of Health dashboard. Blank boxes indicate that no information was released by the Department of Health for that date.

From 25 June to 9 August the Department of Health didn't release daily updates over weekends, this information was released on Mondays for this period.

August
Date Cases Deaths reported Tests Reference
1 - 3 August 2020 40 0 4632 [207]
4 August 2020 8 0 2021 [208]
5 August 2020 10 0 1779 [209]
6 August 2020 43 0 3614 [210]
7 August 2020 15 0 3153 [211]
8 - 10 August 2020 76 1 7819 [212]
11 August 2020 48 0 3402 [213]
12 August 2020 29 0 3572 [214]
13 August 2020 8 0 2179 [215]
14 August 2020 74 1 5597 [216]
15 August 2020 65 0 3797 [217]
16 August 2020 27 0 5658 [218]
17 August 2020 39 0 3340 [219]
18 August 2020 41 1 3850 [220]
19 August 2020 34 0 3088 [221]
20 August 2020 51 0 5177 [222]
Total 6,556 559 247,876
  • Total amount of tests will not add up to the total of daily tests listed above as test numbers are not always announced on a daily basis, however when they are a new overall total is announced as well.
  • Some data is taken from the Department of Health COVID-19 dashboard which updates daily.

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "Coronavirus in Northern Ireland". Department of Health. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Coronavirus (COVID-19) Statistics". NISRA. Retrieved 2 August 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Coronavirus: Pro-rata, NI has fewer deaths than RoI or GB". The News Letter, 9 April 2020.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Coronavirus: How England lags behind other UK nations on testing". BBC News, 9 April 2020.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Coronavirus: NI now in peak of pandemic – but it may be less devastating than feared, says Robin Swann". The Newsletter, 15 April 2020. Quote: "If our modelling is accurate, this should be more than sufficient capacity to meet this surge. In the event of an extreme surge, Northern Ireland’s first Nightingale Hospital has now been established at Belfast City Hospital".
  6. 6.0 6.1 "Coronavirus: NI outlook positive as curve 'flattens'". BBC News, 21 April 2020. Quotes: "The curve for cases of Covid-19 in Northern Ireland is flattening and we could soon be on the downward slope, Northern Ireland's chief scientific advisor has said … Recent reductions in the daily number of hospital admissions as well as the number of deaths suggest that Northern Ireland passed the peak of its outbreak several days ago."
  7. "Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)" (PDF). Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 "First Northern Ireland coronavirus case confirmed as 'drive-through' test centre set up at Antrim hospital". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  9. "SITUATION UPDATE 7 March 2020 Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)" (PDF). Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  10. "Coronavirus: Irish St Patrick's Day parades cancelled". BBC. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  11. "Guidance for people with confirmed or possible coronavirus" (PDF). Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  12. "Coronavirus in NI on 17 March: Tuesday updates". BBC. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  13. 13.0 13.1 "Coronavirus: First death confirmed in NI". BBC. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  14. 14.0 14.1 "First Covid-19 death in Northern Ireland announced as testing increased". RTÉ. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "Coronavirus: Second coronavirus-related death confirmed". BBC. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  16. "UK pubs and restaurants told to shut in virus fight". BBC. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  17. Partington, Richard (20 March 2020). "UK government to pay 80% of wages for those not working in coronavirus crisis". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  18. Sillars, James. "Coronavirus: 110,000 claims for self-employed aid scheme on opening". Sky News.
  19. 19.0 19.1 "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on March 20". BBC. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  20. 20.0 20.1 "Twenty-two new coronavirus cases in Northern Ireland". ITV. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  21. "Coronavirus: 'I didn't get to kiss my mum goodbye'". BBC. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  22. 22.0 22.1 "Coronavirus restrictions 'will last more than three weeks'". BBC. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  23. 23.0 23.1 "Coronavirus: Seven deaths confirmed in Northern Ireland". BBC. 25 March 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  24. Kearney, Vincent (25 March 2020). "Seventh death in NI, 'thousands' believed to have virus". RTÉ. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 Smyth, Catherine (26 March 2020). "Coronavirus: No hospital visits under NI Covid-19 surge plans". BBC. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  26. 26.0 26.1 "Coronavirus: Two more people die in Northern Ireland". BBC. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  27. "Coronavirus: New regulations come into force". BBC. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  28. Kearney, Vincent (28 March 2020). "Sweeping new powers to combat virus for Northern Ireland". RTÉ. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  29. "Executive approves new powers to protect the public". NI Executive. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020. 30px Text was copied from this source, which is available under a Open Government Licence v3.0. © Crown copyright.
  30. 30.0 30.1 "Coronavirus: Six more deaths in Northern Ireland". BBC. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  31. 31.0 31.1 "Coronavirus: Six more people die in Northern Ireland". BBC. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  32. 32.0 32.1 "Coronavirus: NI could see 3,000 deaths in 'first wave'". BBC. April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  33. 33.0 33.1 Cross, Gareth (2 April 2020). "Coronavirus updates: Diane Dodds outlines 'massive shock' to economy as six further deaths in Northern Ireland confirmed". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  34. 34.0 34.1 Madden, Andrew; Cross, Gareth (3 April 2020). "Coronavirus updates: 12 more deaths in Northern Ireland and 130 new Covid-19 cases". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  35. 35.0 35.1 "Coronavirus: Eight more Covid-19 linked deaths in NI". BBC. 4 April 2020. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  36. "Coronavirus: First NHS testing centre to go live at SSE Arena". BBC. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
  37. "Coronavirus: Economic shock to NI becoming clear". BBC News, 4 April 2020.
  38. 38.0 38.1 "Coronavirus: Seven more Covid-19 linked deaths in NI". BBC. 5 April 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  39. 39.0 39.1 "Coronavirus: Twelfth of July parades cancelled due to outbreak". BBC. 6 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  40. 40.0 40.1 "Coronavirus in NI on 7 April". BBC. 7 April 2020. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  41. 41.0 41.1 Edwards, Mark (8 April 2020). "Coronavirus updates: Five further patients die after contracting Covid-19 with 84 new Northern Ireland cases". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  42. 42.0 42.1 "Coronavirus: NI economy facing a 'deep recession'". BBC. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  43. "Coronavirus: Woman with Covid-19 'didn't want to die alone'". BBC. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  44. 44.0 44.1 "Coronavirus updates: 10 further deaths and 112 new Covid-19 Northern Ireland cases confirmed". BBC. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  45. 45.0 45.1 "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 11 April". BBC. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  46. 46.0 46.1 "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 12 April". BBC. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  47. 47.0 47.1 "Coronavirus: NI lockdown extended for three more weeks". BBC. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  48. McCormack, Jayne (15 April 2020). "Three-week extension to NI coronavirus lockdown" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  49. "New Covid-19 statistics dashboard launched for NI". 20 April 2020 – via ITV News.
  50. "Coronavirus: What do the new statistics tell us?". 20 April 2020 – via BBC News.
  51. "Coronavirus: NI lockdown could lift at different pace, suggests Arlene Foster". BBC News, 23 April 2020.
  52. 52.0 52.1 "Daily Covid-19 figures - 29 April 2020". 29 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  53. 53.0 53.1 "Daily Covid-19 figures - 30 April 2020". 30 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  54. "Letter regarding statistical information relating to COVID-19 in Northern Ireland".
  55. 55.0 55.1 "Coronavirus: Rise in deaths in NI care homes". 1 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  56. "Covid-19: Fourteen covid-related deaths at Glengormley care home". 5 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  57. "Coronavirus: NI Executive discusses plan for easing lockdown". 7 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  58. "Coronavirus in NI on 7 May". 7 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  59. "Coronavirus infection rate 'too high' to ease lockdown in Northern Ireland". 7 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  60. "Questions over why north's R rate remains so high". The Irish News, 9 May 2020.
  61. "Coronavirus: 71 care home residents died in North in single week". 8 May 2020 – via Irish News.
  62. "Coronavirus: NI Executive publishes plan for easing lockdown". 12 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  63. "Executive publishes Coronavirus recovery strategy". 12 May 2020 – via Northern Ireland Executive.
  64. "CORONAVIRUS EXECUTIVE APPROACH TO DECISION-MAKING" (PDF). 12 May 2020 – via Northern Ireland Executive.
  65. "Coronavirus: NI Executive agrees to lift more lockdown measures". 18 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  66. "Coronavirus: No deaths reported in NI in last 24 hours". 26 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  67. https://files.nisra.gov.uk/Deaths/Weekly-Deaths-Dashboard.html
  68. 68.0 68.1 "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 31 May". 31 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  69. "Health Minister announces £11.7m care home support package". 2 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  70. "Coronavirus: Small shops in NI can reopen from Friday". 8 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  71. "New ID card for carers launched". 8 June 2020 – via Department of Health.
  72. "NI's hotels and bars can reopen from 3 July". 15 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  73. "NI unemployment more than doubles in two months". 16 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  74. "Coronavirus: Hairdressers can reopen in NI from 6 July". 18 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  75. "Coronavirus: No new cases in NI for first time since lockdown". 20 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  76. "Coronavirus: NI to move to 1m distancing rule from Monday". 25 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  77. 77.0 77.1 "Covid-19: Three further deaths, six additional cases". 31 May 2020 – via RTÉ News.
  78. "Foster adds to calls for O'Neill to step down". 2 July 2020 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  79. "Sunak to give firms £1,000 'bonus' to hire trainees". 6 July 2020 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  80. "Coronavirus (COVID-19): regulations, guidance and what they mean for you". NI government. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  81. McClafferty, Enda (2 July 2020). "Face coverings on public transport from 10 July" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  82. Campbell, John (18 July 2020). "Social distance of 1m 'could preserve 30,000 jobs'" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  83. Cullen, Louise (22 July 2020). "PHA identifies 16 clusters of Covid-19 in NI" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  84. "Covid-19: Tracing app is released for NI". BBC. Retrieved 30 July 2020.
  85. McCann, Nuala (31 July 2020). "Coronavirus: Baby steps as shielders move back into world" – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  86. 86.0 86.1 "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 31 July". 31 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  87. "Coronavirus: Number of Covid-19 cases in NI passes 6,000". 5 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  88. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 6 August". 6 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  89. "Coronavirus: Executive moves towards mandatory face coverings". 6 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  90. "Coronavirus: All pupils to return to school full-time". 6 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  91. "Coronavirus: PSNI to focus enforcement 'in hotspot areas'". 20 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  92. 92.0 92.1 "Coronavirus: City Hospital to host NI's first Nightingale". BBC News. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  93. "City hospital to be Northern Ireland's first Nightingale hospital". Health. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  94. "Coronavirus: Nightingale hospital in NI being stood down". 13 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  95. "Coronavirus deaths: Why NI's statistics are changing". BBC News, 15 April 2020.
  96. 96.0 96.1 "Coronavirus: Death toll in NI about 70% higher than daily figure". 15 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  97. "Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency". NISRA. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  98. "Two more cases of coronavirus confirmed in NI". BBC News. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  99. "Fourth case of coronavirus diagnosed in NI". BBC News. 6 March 2020. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  100. "Three more coronavirus cases confirmed in NI". BBC News. 7 March 2020. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  101. "Keep 'common sense approach' to coronavirus". BBC News. 9 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  102. "Four more coronavirus cases confirmed in NI". BBC News. 10 March 2020. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  103. "Coronavirus: First death recorded in Republic of Ireland". BBC News. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  104. "Coronavirus: Two new cases in Northern Ireland". BBC News. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  105. "Coronavirus NI: This is why we can't tell you where all the Coronavirus COVID-19 cases are in Northern Ireland - First cases of Coronavirus community transmission recorded in Northern Ireland - Nine new cases of Coronavirus detected in NI". Newsletter. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  106. "Coronavirus: NI 'school closures will last for at least 16 weeks'". BBC News. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  107. "Coronavirus: Eleven new cases in Northern Ireland". BBC News. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  108. "Seven new cases of coronavirus takes NI total to 52". ITV. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  109. "Ten new coronavirus cases in NI takes total to 62". ITV. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  110. "Six new cases of coronavirus in NI takes total to 68". ITV. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  111. "Coronavirus: 'Wave of deaths' if social distancing not followed". BBC. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  112. "One more death and 123 new cases of Covid-19 in Northern Ireland". RTÉ. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  113. "Coronavirus in NI on Monday 13 April". BBC. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  114. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 14 April". BBC. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  115. "Coronavirus: Minister says 18 more NI deaths 'a wake-up call'". BBC. Retrieved 16 April 2020.
  116. "Coronavirus in NI on 17 April". BBC. Retrieved 17 April 2020.
  117. "Coronavirus in NI on 17 April" (PDF). Public Health Agency. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  118. "Coronavirus in NI on 19 April". BBC. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  119. "Coronavirus updates: 13 further people die in Northern Ireland hospitals". 20 April 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  120. "The Department of Health confirms that today a further nine people have sadly lost their lives to Covid-19. Figures today in the recently launched dashboard reported an incorrect figure. The report has been temporarily suspended". 21 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  121. "UPDATE on coronavirus (#COVID19) in NI". 22 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  122. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 23 April 2020". 23 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  123. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 24 April 2020". 24 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  124. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 25 April 2020". 25 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  125. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 26 April 2020". 26 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  126. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 27 April 2020". 27 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  127. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 28 April 2020". 28 April 2020 – via Department of Health.
  128. "Coronavirus in NI on 2 May". 2 May 2020 – via BBC.
  129. "Coronavirus in NI on 3 May". 3 May 2020 – via BBC.
  130. "Coronavirus: Executive 'working actively' on lockdown exit plan as six further NI deaths reported". 4 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  131. "'Frontline' in fight against pandemic is now in care homes, says Swann, as 17 further deaths reported in Northern Ireland". 5 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  132. "Coronavirus updates: 14 further Northern Ireland deaths reported". 6 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  133. "Coronavirus updates: Infection rate 'too high' to ease restrictions as four further NI deaths recorded". 7 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  134. "Coronavirus updates: Northern Ireland marks VE Day as five more deaths announced". 8 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  135. "Four further Covid-19 deaths in Northern Ireland". 9 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  136. "Coronavirus: Five more deaths in NI". 10 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  137. "Coronavirus updates: Three further Northern Ireland deaths as Executive finalises plans for easing lockdown". 11 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  138. "Coronavirus updates: Nine further deaths in NI as Executive publishes five step plan for lifting lockdown". 12 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  139. "Coronavirus updates: Belfast's Nightingale Hospital 'stood down' as plan announced to protect care homes from outbreak". 13 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  140. "Coronavirus updates: Executive announces partial easing of lockdown measures from Monday". 14 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  141. "Coronavirus updates: Safety of staff is 'non-negotiable', says economy minister after 15 further deaths". 15 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  142. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 16 May". 16 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  143. "Daily Covid-19 figures - 17 May 2020". 17 May 2020 – via Department of Health.
  144. "Coronavirus in NI on 18 May". 18 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  145. "Coronavirus in NI: Latest updates on 19 May". 19 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  146. "Coronavirus in NI: Latest updates on 20 May". 20 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  147. "Coronavirus in NI: Latest updates on 21 May". 21 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  148. "Coronavirus: PSNI to restore neighbourhood policing after Bank Holiday weekend". 22 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  149. "One further Covid-19 death in Northern Ireland". 23 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  150. "One further death and 25 new cases of Covid-19 in Northern Ireland". 24 May 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  151. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 25 May". 25 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  152. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 26 May". 26 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  153. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 27 May". 27 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  154. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 28 May". 28 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  155. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 29 May". 29 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  156. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 30 May". 30 May 2020 – via BBC News.
  157. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 1 June". 1 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  158. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 2 June". 2 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  159. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 3 June". 3 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  160. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 4 June". 4 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  161. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 5 June". 5 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  162. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 6 June". 6 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  163. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 7 June". 7 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  164. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 8 June". 8 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  165. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 9 June". 9 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  166. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 10 June". 10 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  167. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 11 June". 11 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  168. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 12 June". 12 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  169. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 13 June". 13 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  170. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 14 June". 14 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  171. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 15 June". 15 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  172. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 16 June". 16 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  173. "One further Covid-19-linked death in NI". 17 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  174. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 18 June". 18 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  175. "As it happened: One further coronavirus-linked death in NI". 19 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  176. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland: No new deaths and four new cases". 21 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  177. "Coronavirus in NI on 22 June". 22 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  178. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland: One further death as First Minister Foster hints at social distancing change". 23 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  179. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 24 June". 24 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  180. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 25 June". 25 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  181. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 26 June". 26 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  182. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland updates: One death and two new cases of Covid-19". 27 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  183. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland updates: Sunday June 28". 28 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  184. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland updates: Groups of up to 30 people allowed to meet outdoors, Foster announces". 29 June 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  185. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 30 June". 30 June 2020 – via BBC News.
  186. "As it happened: Coronavirus in NI on 2 July". 2 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  187. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland: O'Neill's apology over Storey funeral 'falls short', says Foster". 3 July 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  188. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland: Indoor weddings to resume from July 10". 6 July 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  189. "Coronavirus Northern Ireland: No further Covid deaths for fifth day as Assembly prepares to debate Storey funeral". 7 July 2020 – via Belfast Telegraph.
  190. "Coronavirus in NI on 8 July". 8 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  191. "Coronavirus in NI on 9 July". 9 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  192. "Coronavirus in NI on 10 July". 10 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  193. "Coronavirus in NI on 13 July". 13 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  194. "Coronavirus in NI on 14 July". 14 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  195. "Coronavirus in NI on 15 July". 15 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  196. "Coronavirus in NI on 16 July". 16 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  197. "Coronavirus in NI on 17 July". 17 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  198. "Coronavirus in NI on 20 July". 20 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  199. "Coronavirus in NI on 21 July". 21 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  200. "Coronavirus in NI on 22 July". 22 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  201. "Coronavirus in NI on 23 July". 23 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  202. "Coronavirus in NI on 24 July". 24 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  203. "Coronavirus in NI on 25 July". 25 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  204. "Coronavirus in NI on 28 July". 28 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  205. "Coronavirus in NI on 29 July". 29 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  206. "Coronavirus in NI on 30 July". 30 July 2020 – via BBC News.
  207. "Coronavirus in NI on 3 August". 3 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  208. "4th August Update" (PDF). 4 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  209. "5th August Update" (PDF). 5 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  210. "6th August Update" (PDF). 6 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  211. "7th August Update" (PDF). 7 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  212. "Coronavirus in NI on 10 August". 10 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  213. "Coronavirus in NI on 11 August". 11 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  214. "Coronavirus in NI on 12 August". 12 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  215. "Coronavirus in NI on 13 August". 13 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  216. "Coronavirus: Patient under 40 dies after contracting Covid-19". 14 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  217. "Coronavirus: NI reports 65 new Covid-19 cases as weekend updates return". 15 August 2020 – via BBC News.
  218. "16th August Update" (PDF). 16 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  219. "17th August Update" (PDF). 17 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  220. "18th August Update" (PDF). 18 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  221. "19th August Update" (PDF). 19 August 2020 – via Department of Health.
  222. "20th August Update" (PDF). 20 August 2020 – via Department of Health.

Further reading[edit source | edit]

External links[edit source | edit]

Template:Coronavirus pandemic in the United Kingdom