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COVID-19 pandemic in Pennsylvania

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COVID-19 pandemic in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania National Guard - 49686952447.jpg
Pennsylvania Air National Guard troops set up at a Montgomery County coronavirus test site
COVID-19 outbreak Pennsylvania per capita cases map.svg
Confirmed cases per 100,000 residents by county
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationPennsylvania
First caseDelaware and Wayne counties
Arrival dateMarch 6, 2020
(11 months, 3 weeks and 6 days)
Confirmed cases87,242
Deaths
6,687 (confirmed)
Official website
www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Pennsylvania in March 2020. As of June 27, 2020, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has confirmed 81,956 cases and 6,579 deaths in the state.[1]

As of July 2020, Pennsylvania has the 8th highest number of confirmed cases in the United States.[2]

Timeline[edit source | edit]

Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/United States/Pennsylvania medical cases chart

March[edit source | edit]

  • On March 6, Governor Tom Wolf reported Pennsylvania's first two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Delaware County and in Wayne County.[3][4] Both cases were related to travel — one to another state within the U.S. and another to Europe.[5][6][7]
  • On March 9, 4 new cases were confirmed, bringing the total to 10.
  • On March 10, 2 new cases were confirmed, bringing the total to 12.[8]
  • On March 13, Governor Wolf announced that all Pennsylvania schools will be closed for at least two weeks.[9] Additionally, park programs were canceled.[10]
  • By March 17, there were 96 cases in the state; more than half of them were in the Philadelphia area with Montgomery County as the highest number.[11]
  • On March 18, the department of health reported the state's first death related to the virus, a patient at St. Luke's Fountain Hill campus in Northampton County.[12][13]
  • On March 19, Governor Wolf ordered a statewide shutdown of all "non-life sustaining businesses," with enforcement of this order going into effect at 12:01 am on Saturday, March 21.[14] The PA Department of Education canceled all statewide assessments including the PSSA testing, Keystone exams, and the Pennsylvania Alternate System of Assessment (PASA) for the remainder of the 2019–2020 school year.[15]
  • On March 21, the department of health announced the state's second death as well as 103 new cases. The second death was in Allegheny County.[12] Rachel Levine, the Secretary of Health for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, said during a press conference "A state-wide shelter in place was not out of the question."[16]
  • On March 22, 273 new cases were reported, bringing the total to 644. The sixth death occurred in Montgomery County.[17][18]
  • On March 25, a 35-year-old woman in Hanover Township, Luzerne County was arrested for deliberately coughing and spitting on food at a Gerrity's supermarket. She made verbal threats about being infected with Covid-19 and has been charged with two counts of terrorism and two other felonies plus a misdemeanor for attempting to steal a pack of beer. The supermarket had to throw out $35,000 worth of merchandise and has since raised employee pay $1 per hour. The woman is being tested for coronavirus.[19]
  • On March 28, Governor Tom Wolf issued a stay-at-home order for Beaver, Butler, Westmoreland, Centre, and Washington Counties, according to a release from Harrisburg. Governor Wolf announced 533 new cases, bringing the statewide total to 2,751. The highest rise in cases was in Philadelphia County.[12]

April[edit source | edit]

Variable-message sign along Interstate 95 in Philadelphia telling people to practice social distancing, stay home, and limit travel
  • On April 1, Governor Wolf extended the stay-at-home order across the entire state effective that evening at 8:00 pm.[20][21]
  • On April 3, Governor Wolf asked Pennsylvanians to wear cloth face coverings in public; this became mandatory on April 19. Philadelphia reduced recycling pickup to every two weeks due to staff shortages.[22]
  • On April 9, Governor Wolf officially ordered the closing of all Pennsylvania schools through the end of the academic school year. He stated that they will resume all classes through means of Google Classroom and other online classroom tools. He had not yet stated if the Class of 2020 graduations will be postponed or cancelled.[23]
  • On April 15, Health Secretary Levine issued an order requiring safety precautions for essential businesses (except for Hospitals).[24]
  • On April 17, Governor Wolf laid out a plan to provide relief for Pennsylvanians (Phase 1), gradually reopen the state (Phase 2), and recover from this situation (Phase 3).[25] The state government used a three-phase color-coded plan to reopen the state. The first and most restrictive phase is the red phase, which includes a stay-at-home order and only allows essential businesses to be open. The second phase of the reopening process is the yellow phase, which calls for aggressive mitigation and allows some businesses to reopen while others must remain closed. The third and least restrictive phase is the green phase, which allows most businesses to be open while following health guidelines.[24]

May[edit source | edit]

  • On May 7, Governor Wolf extended the stay at home order until June 4 for counties in the red phase.[26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33]
  • On May 8, 24 counties entered the yellow phase, allowing some businesses to reopen. They are Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Montour, Northumberland, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Union, Venango, and Warren.[34][35]
  • On May 15, 13 more counties entered the yellow phase: Allegheny, Armstrong, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Cambria, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Somerset, Washington, and Westmoreland.[36][37]
  • On May 22, 12 more counties entered the yellow phase: Adams, Beaver, Carbon, Columbia, Cumberland, Juniata, Mifflin, Perry, Susquehanna, Wayne, Wyoming, and York.[38][39]
  • On May 29, eight more counties entered the yellow phase: Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lebanon, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike and Schuylkill. The first 18 counties to enter the green phase were Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango, and Warren.[40]

June[edit source | edit]

Variable-message sign along Interstate 376 in Carnegie, just outside of Pittsburgh, telling people to continue social distancing
  • On June 5, 16 more counties entered the green phase: Allegheny, Armstrong, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Cambria, Clinton, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Lycoming, Mercer, Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland. The last ten counties to enter the yellow phase were Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, and Philadelphia. There are no remaining counties in the red phase.[41][42][43][44]
  • On June 12, 12 more counties entered the green phase: Adams, Beaver, Carbon, Columbia, Cumberland, Juniata, Mifflin, Northumberland, Union, Wayne, Wyoming, and York.[45][46][47][48][49][50]
  • On June 19, eight more counties entered the green phase: Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Luzerne, Monroe, Perry, Pike, and Schuylkill.[51][52][53]
  • On June 24, Pennsylvania's Secretary of Health, Dr. Rachel Levine, announced that the state would partner with CVS Health to provide free COVID-19 tests to skilled nursing facilities across the state, to commence June 29. [54]
  • On June 26, 12 more counties entered the green phase: Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Erie, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia and Susquehanna.

Government response[edit source | edit]

The TLA on March 17, 2020 during the City of Philadelphia's shutdown during the Coronavirus epidemic

As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, Governor Wolf has implemented social distancing measures in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery counties in the Philadelphia suburbs along with Allegheny County in the Pittsburgh area, which urges non-essential businesses to close, such as malls, movie theaters, and casinos. Essential businesses such as gas stations, grocery stores, and pharmacies will remain open. Essential services such as police, fire, and emergency medical services will be available. Starting March 16, bars and restaurants will be ordered to close to dine-in customers in those counties. Starting March 17, Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores in the four suburban Philadelphia counties will close. In addition, non-essential travel is discouraged. A no visitor policy was implemented for correctional facilities and nursing homes statewide.[11]

On March 22, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney issued a stay-at-home order for the city, set to take effect the following day at 8:00 am.[55] On Monday the 23rd, Governor Wolf issued additional stay at home orders for seven counties: Allegheny, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Monroe, and a redundant order for Philadelphia County, to go into effect at 8:00 pm the same day.[56]

  • On March 16, the social distancing measures were extended to the entire state, while Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney ordered nonessential businesses and city government to close for two weeks.[57] Starting March 17, SEPTA Regional Rail trains in the Philadelphia area will operate on an enhanced Saturday schedule for two weeks due to reduced ridership and staffing. In addition, SEPTA will offer refunds for unused and partially used passes.[58]
  • On March 19, the state's department of education announced that all statewide assessments would be canceled for the remainder of the 2019–2020 school year.[59]
  • On March 22, Governor Tom Wolf announced the commonwealth would likely postpone its Democratic and Republican primary elections from April 28 to June 2.[60]
  • On March 27, Wolf signed a bill moving the primary elections to June 2.[61]

Impact on sports[edit source | edit]

Most of the state's sports teams were affected. Several leagues began postponing or suspending their seasons starting March 12. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on that date, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates.[62] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Philadelphia 76ers.[63] In the National Hockey League, the season was suspended for an indefinite amount of time, affecting the Pittsburgh Penguins and Philadelphia Flyers.[64]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[65] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[66]

Statistics[edit source | edit]

Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/Pennsylvania medical cases by county

Graphs[edit source | edit]

Sources: [67][68]


See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. "Pennsylvania COVID-19 Numbers". Department of Health. Archived from the original on April 9, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  2. "Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count". The New York Times. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
  3. "Wolf Administration Confirms Two Presumptive Positive Cases of COVID-19" (Press release). Pennsylvania Office of the Governor. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  4. "2 presumed positive coronavirus cases in Pa., including Delaware County". WPVI. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  5. "Pennsylvania now has 2 confirmed cases of coronavirus". AP via WHYY. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  6. Parker, Randy (March 6, 2020). "Pa. confirms 'presumed positive' cases of the coronavirus". York Daily Record. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  7. Stamm, Dan (March 6, 2020). "Pennsylvania Reports 2 Coronavirus Cases, 1 in Delaware County". WCAU-TV. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  8. Staff, WESA. "LIVE BLOG: Coronavirus In Pittsburgh, March 9–15". www.wesa.fm. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  9. "Pennsylvania, Delaware Close All Schools Due to Outbreak". WCAU. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  10. PA cancels public park programs in light of COVID-19 Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine Pocono Record
  11. 11.0 11.1 "Coronavirus PA: State announces 16 new COVID-19 cases, bringing total to at least 63 across the commonwealth". Philadelphia, PA: WPVI-TV. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 "Coronavirus". PA Department of Health. Archived from the original on March 4, 2020. Retrieved April 7, 2020.
  13. lehighvalleylive.com, Steve Novak | For (March 18, 2020). "1st coronavirus death in Pennsylvania is from Lehigh Valley". lehighvalleylive. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  14. "ALL NON-LIFE-SUSTAINING BUSINESSES IN PENNSYLVANIA TO CLOSE PHYSICAL LOCATIONS AS OF 8 PM TODAY TO SLOW SPREAD OF COVID-19". Governor Tom Wolf. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  15. "Coronavirus Latest: Pennsylvania Department Of Education Cancels Statewide Assessments". March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  16. "Who is Rachel Levine? Pa. health secretary offers calm, reassurance amid pandemic". PA Post. March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  17. Staff, WPXI com News. "LIVE UPDATES: Coronavirus in Pa.: Stay-at-home order issued for Allegheny Co. as amount of cases across state rises to 644". WPXI. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  18. Staff, WPXI com News. "TIMELINE: Pennsylvania coronavirus updates March 22". WPXI. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  19. Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges Archived March 30, 2020, at the Wayback Machine by Elisha Fieldstadt, NBC News, 27 March 2020
  20. Miller, Hannah (April 1, 2020). "Georgia to issue shelter-in-place order amid coronavirus outbreak". CNBC. Archived from the original on June 3, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
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  22. {cite news|url=https://whyy.org/articles/coronavirus-update-15000-chromebooks-donated-to-phillys-charter-catholic-schools/%7Ctitle=Coronavirus update: Gov. Tom Wolf asks Pennsylvanians to wear masks outdoors}}
  23. "Schools ordered to remain closed until end of academic year".
  24. 24.0 24.1 "Process to Reopen Pennsylvania". governor.pa.gov. pa.gov. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  25. "Plan for Pennsylvainia". governor.pa.gov. pa.gov. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  26. "Governor Extends Stay-at-Home Order to June 4 - Delaware County, Pennsylvania". www.delcopa.gov. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  27. "Wolf extends stay-at-home order for Pa. counties still in red phase until June 4". WFMZ.com. Archived from the original on June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  28. "Gov. Tom Wolf extends stay-at-home order for red phase counties until June 4". FOX 29 Philadelphia. May 7, 2020. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
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  30. "Stay-at-home order extended to June 4th for red phase counties". PAhomepage.com. May 8, 2020. Archived from the original on May 17, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  31. "Gov. Wolf extends stay-at-home order to June 4 for all counties in red phase". fox43.com. Archived from the original on May 14, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  32. Staff, WJAC (May 7, 2020). "Wolf extends 'red phase' stay-at-home order to June 4; counties can still move to 'yellow'". WJAC. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
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  35. "These counties will be the first in 'yellow' as Pa. lifts some coronavirus restrictions". pennlive. May 1, 2020. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  36. "13 counties in southwest Pa. will be next to reopen". pennlive. May 8, 2020. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  37. "Gov. Wolf Announces 13 Counties will Move to Yellow Phase of Reopening on May 15". Governor Tom Wolf. May 8, 2020. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  38. "Gov. Wolf: 12 More Counties Going Green on June 12". Governor Tom Wolf. June 5, 2020. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
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  40. Novak, Steve (May 29, 2020). "Pa. coronavirus reopening: 16 more counties to enter green phase June 5, when Lehigh Valley, Philly expect to go yellow. | COVID-19 case map (5/29/20)". Lehigh Valley Live. Archived from the original on June 21, 2020.
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  46. Reporter, JOHN FINNERTY CNHI State. "12 more counties to enter green phase". The Herald. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  47. Reporter, JOHN FINNERTY CNHI State. "12 more counties to enter green phase". The Herald. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
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  56. Coloumbis, Angela; McDaniel, Justine (March 23, 2020). "Pa. Gov. Tom Wolf extends school closures until early April, issues stay-at-home order for 7 counties". Spotlight PA. Archived from the original on April 9, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  57. "Governor Wolf extends COVID-19 shutdown across Pennsylvania". Philadelphia, PA: WPVI-TV. March 16, 2020. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  58. Madej, Patricia (March 16, 2020). "SEPTA adjusts Regional Rail schedules amid coronavirus, offers some refunds for riders". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  59. "Pa. Department of Education cancels statewide assessments". ABC27. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  60. Lai, Jonathan; Brennan, Chris; Angela, Couloumbis (March 22, 2020). "Pennsylvania governor, legislative leaders reach deal to postpone 2020 primary for coronavirus". Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  61. Terruso, Julia (March 27, 2020). "Pennsylvania just postponed its primary due to coronavirus. Here's what it means for voters and 2020 campaigns". Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on May 14, 2020. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  62. Feinsand, Mark (March 16, 2020). "Opening of regular season to be pushed back". MLB.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  63. "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  64. NHL statement on coronavirus Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NHL, March 12, 2020
  65. NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships Archived March 12, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NCAA, March 12, 2020
  66. NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak Archived March 18, 2020, at the Wayback Machine MLive.com, March 16, 2020
  67. Cite error: The named reference PAH-Cases-Current was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  68. Cite error: The named reference PAH-Cases-Archive was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

External links[edit source | edit]