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COVID-19 pandemic in Senegal

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COVID-19 pandemic in Senegal
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationSenegal
First caseDakar
Arrival date2 March 2020
(1 year and 4 days)
OriginFrance
Confirmed cases3,348 (as of 29 May) [1]
Active cases1,560 (as of 26 May)
Recovered1,565 (as of 26 May)
Deaths
36 (as of 26 May)

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached Senegal on March 2, 2020.

Background[edit source | edit]

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019.[2][3]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003,[4][5] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll.[6][4]

Timeline[edit source | edit]

Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/Senegal medical cases chart On 2 March 2020, a 54-year-old man from France was the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Senegal,[7] living in the Almadies Arrondissement of Dakar, having been tested positive at the Pasteur Institute in Dakar.[7] He had travelled on Air Senegal on 29 February 2020.[7] Senegal became the second Sub-Saharan country to report confirmed cases after Nigeria.[citation needed]

The second confirmed case of COVID-19 was a French expat who came to Dakar from France. They are quoted as being in a "comfortable" condition.[8]

By 4 March, the number of cases rose to four, with both cases being foreign nationals.[9] The first case was the wife of the first case in Senegal, who arrived in the country on 19 February. The other case was a Briton from London, who came to Senegal on 24 February.[citation needed]

Basketball Africa League postponed the start of their inaugural season on 6 March 2020, which would have taken place in Dakar.[10] This came as fear mounted over religious events and travel, especially those related to the Grand Magal, a Mouride festivity which occurs in Touba.[11]

On 10 March, Senegalese Health Minister Abdoulaye Diouf Sarr told local press that the government would call off religious events if advised to do so. On the same day, a Senegalese national returning from Italy confirmed positive, becoming the fifth case in the country.[12]

On 12 March, five more cases were announced in Senegal, which were family members of a confirmed case of the Senegalese national returning from Italy.[13] One of the victims was in the holy city of Touba, despite many people being convinced by clerics that they were immune to the coronavirus.[14]

As of 15 March, there were 24 confirmed cases in Senegal.[15] Senegal imposed travel restrictions, banned cruise ships, and closed schools for three weeks in response to the coronavirus. They also banned public gatherings for a month, including Muslim and Christian pilgrimages.[16]

On 23 March, Senegal declared a state of emergency.[17]

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. "COVID-19 Dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU)". 24 May 2020.
  2. Elsevier. "Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier Connect. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  3. Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN 1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Crunching the numbers for coronavirus". Imperial News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  5. "High consequence infectious diseases (HCID); Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  6. "World Federation Of Societies of Anaesthesiologists – Coronavirus". www.wfsahq.org. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 "Coronavirus : Le Sénégal enregistre son premier cas". Le Quotidien (in French). 2 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  8. "Second case of coronavirus in Senegal as African sports shelved". RFI. 5 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  9. "Senegal confirms third and fourth coronavirus cases". Reuters. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  10. "Basketball Africa League postpones start of inaugural season". NBA.com (Press release). 3 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  11. Paquette, Danielle; Tall, Borso (6 March 2020). "Coronavirus fears rise in Senegal as thousands travel for religious festivals". The Washington Post. Retrieved 14 March 2020. Unknown parameter |last-author-amp= ignored (help)
  12. "Senegal confirms fifth case of COVID-19". aa.com.tr. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  13. "Senegal announces 5 new coronavirus cases". News24. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  14. "Coronavirus hits Senegal's holy city as cleric declares faithful are immune". Africanews. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  15. "Senegal orders all schools closed in response to coronavirus". Reuters. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  16. Magome, Mogomot Si (15 March 2020). "Several African nations roll out measures to fight virus". Yahoo News. Associated Press. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  17. "Ivory Coast, Senegal declare emergencies, impose curfews in coronavirus response". Reuters. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.