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COVID-19 pandemic in South Sudan

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COVID-19 pandemic in South Sudan
COVID-19 Cases in South Sudan.svg
Map of cases by state as of 8 May. Some cases are not shown if their location is unknown
  0 cases or no data
  1–9 cases
  10–49 cases
  50–99 cases
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationSouth Sudan
Arrival date5 April 2020
(11 months)
Confirmed cases347[1]
Recovered4[2]
Deaths
6[1]

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached South Sudan on April 5, 2020. As of May 18, there are 347 confirmed cases and 6 deaths due to COVID-19 in South Sudan.

Timeline[edit source | edit]

Prevention efforts[edit source | edit]

On 14 March, South Sudan suspended flights to countries affected by coronavirus.[3] On 20 March, classes in all schools and universities were suspended until 19 April, and Vice President Hussein Abdelbagi ordered the suspension of sporting, social, political, and religious gatherings for 6 weeks.[4] This was followed on 25 March by a nighttime curfew from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m.[5][6] On 27 March, around 500 people in quarantine from Sudan escaped in Renk, leading to northern Upper Nile State being placed under lockdown for 14 days.[7] From 25 March, after the coronavirus reached Mali, to 5 April 2020, South Sudan was the largest country by area without any confirmed cases of COVID-19.

April 2020[edit source | edit]

On 5 April, the first case of COVID-19 in the country was confirmed in a 29-year-old patient, a United Nations worker who arrived on 28 February from the Netherlands[5] via Ethiopia.[8] South Sudan thus became the 51st African country (out of 54) to confirm a case.[5] The patient was quarantined at a UN facility and contact tracing efforts were undertaken.

The second case of COVID-19 was confirmed on 7 April; the patient was another female United Nations worker, aged 53, who arrived from Nairobi on 23 March and self-quarantined.[9] The third case on 9 April was also a female United Nations worker who had been in contact with the first patient.[10]

On 9 April, the Ministry of General Education announced it was preparing a distance learning program for primary and secondary school students via radio and television.[11] On 13 April, South Sudan suspended flights and public transportation between the states and between Juba and the states.[12]

Unlike the first cases, the fifth and sixth cases on 23 and 25 April were confirmed to be South Sudanese nationals.[13]

After 28 people tested positive on 28 April, the curfew was extended to be from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., all restaurants were only allowed to be takeout, and all passenger boda bodas were banned.[14]

South Sudan has a population of 11 million people, but only four ventilators.[5]

May 2020[edit source | edit]

Although cases were still increasing, South Sudan began the process of reopening on 7 May. The curfew was decreased to 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., boda bodas were allowed to have one passenger and rickshaws two passengers, if both the driver and the passengers wore face masks, and shops were allowed to reopen with a maximum of five occupants at a time.[15] On 12 May airports were reopened for local, regional, and international flights.[16]

On 14 May, South Sudan reported its first death from COVID-19.[17]

On 18 May, First Vice President Riek Machar announced he and his wife, Angelina Teny, had tested positive for the virus.[18]

Data[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "South Sudan vice president, wife test positive for coronavirus". Reuters. 18 May 2020. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  2. https://eyeradio.org/covid-19-south-sudan-confirms-54-more-cases/
  3. "South Sudan halts flights to countries affected by coronavirus". Radio Tamazuj. Archived from the original on 16 March 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  4. "South Sudan closes schools, universities amid coronavirus fears". Radio Tamazuj. Archived from the original on 21 March 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Mayra Ajack, South Sudan 51st of 54 African nations to report virus case, Associated Press (5 April 2020).
  6. "South Sudan imposes nighttime curfew over coronavirus". Radio Tamazuj. Archived from the original on 26 March 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  7. "Northern Upper Nile under lockdown after citizens escaped from quarantine". Radio Tamazuj. Archived from the original on 28 March 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  8. "South Sudan confirms first case of coronavirus". Reuters. 5 April 2020. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  9. "South Sudan confirms second case of coronavirus". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  10. "South Sudan records third case of COVID-19". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  11. "Education ministry to launch distance learning for students". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  12. "South Sudan suspends interstate travels over COVID-19". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  13. "South Sudan records its sixth coronavirus case". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  14. "COVID-19: South Sudan reviews curfew as cases rise to 34". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  15. "South Sudan loosens restrictions even as coronavirus cases increase". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  16. "South Sudan reopens airports amid rise in COVID-19 cases". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 13 May 2020.
  17. "South Sudan records first COVID-19 death as cases rise". Radio Tamazuj. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  18. "Dr. Riek Machar and wife test positive for COVID-19". Eye Radio. 18 May 2020. Retrieved 18 May 2020.

See also[edit source | edit]