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COVID-19 pandemic in the Community of Madrid

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COVID-19 pandemic in the Community of Madrid
Mortality in Madrid, 25 November 2019 – 6 April 2020.png
Daily deaths in Madrid, 25 November 2019 – 6 April 2020. Recent dates are incomplete.
Covid 19 España, confinamiento en Casa (49682099081).jpg
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationCommunity of Madrid
Confirmed cases40,469 (as of 6 April 2020)[1]
Recovered18,410 (as of 6 April 2020)[1]
Deaths
5,371 (as of 6 April 2020)[1]

Template:COVID-19 pandemic data/Community of Madrid medical cases chart The COVID-19 pandemic in Spain had its first case in the Community of Madrid on 25 February 2020.

Timeline[edit source | edit]

The pandemic was first confirmed to have spread to the region on 25 February 2020 with the positive result of a 24-year-old male who had been in Italy.[2][1] By the time the pandemic started the region had 540 available ICUs and roughly 14,000 hospital beds.[3]

On 9 March 2020, the Government of the Community of Madrid approved extraordinary measures, including the cancellation (to be enforced from 11 March onwards) of all in-person classes in the Autonomous community of Madrid at all educational levels for an initial period of 15 days, until 26 March, encouraging online lessons instead if possible.[4][5]

On 13 March 2020 the Government of the Community of Madrid decreed the shutting down of bars, restaurants and "non-alimentary" shops (only allowing the opening of supermarkets and pharmacies).[6] On 14 March the country-wide state of alarm for an initial period of 15 days was declared in accordance with Article 116.2 of the Spanish constitution.[7][8][9]

On 12 March, the hiring of Antonio Burgueño as advisor was announced by the regional administration.[10] Burgueño had previously served as Director-General for Hospitals under Manuel Lamela, Juan José Güemes and Javier Fernández-Lasquetty, and had left office after Justice blocked the latter's attempt to further privatize the health system.[11]

During the height of the crisis (from mid March to mid April) the regional administration conducted a triage, denying the transfer to the public hospital network of old people in dire conditions from the nursing homes, yet it allowed the transfer of ill-people in possession of a private health insurance, despite the regional health minister Enrique Ruiz Escudero [es] had assumed command over the private health care system on March 12.[12]

On 19 March the regional minister for Social Policies, Alberto Reyero [es], addressed a petition to the Government of Spain, asking for the intervention of the Military Emergencies Unit (UME) in the nursing homes.[13] He was immediately disauthorized by Isabel Díaz Ayuso.[13] Reyero was removed from the political management of the nursing homes on 26 March.[13] Then, the regional government entrusted to Encarnación Burgueño—the daughter of Antonio Burgueño and owner of Cardio Líder (a ghost company)—the managing of the nursing home's crisis, enforcing the so-called "Operación Bicho" from 26 March onwards, attempting to provide care to the nearly 50,000 old folks in the nursing homes.[10] 12 days later, on 6 April (the same day the information about the hiring of Burgueño Jr. was made public), the Operación Bicho was abruptly aborted.[10] More than 3,000 old people had died during that period.[10] All was fine for Burgueño by 4 April, as she reportedly wrote to a close collaborator "we already have inspected 8,700 grandpas". Do you know what that means? The work you have performed? Just in a week?... No way! If we keep doing this, we are becoming kings and masters of the social-health management in Madrid autonomous community. You are going to realize my dream, working in the social-health sector. Having my own company."[10]

On 31 March 2020, two weeks after the death of 19 elderly people in a care home Monte Hermoso became public, the regional administration decided to intervene 8 private retirement homes (including the former), overwhelmed by the deadly advance of the pandemic, sometimes hidden by the companies operating the old folks' homes.[14]

The regional legislature, the Assembly of Madrid, was kept closed for more than a month, until sessions were resumed on 14 April.[3] The government coalition between PP and Ciudadanos showed discrepancies on the handling of the management of the retirement homes.[3] From 8 March to 14 April, almost 5,000 older people died in nursing homes in the region (781 confirmed cases and 4,172 with compatible symptoms).[15]

On 7 May 2020, the director-general of public health resigned, apparently in protest at the regional government's decision to request a loosening of the lockdown restrictions.[16]

On 1 June 2020, Alberto Reyero [es] (Ciudadanos), regional minister responsible for nursing homes at the height of the health crisis, declared he had asked for three times the regional ministry of Health (managed by Enrique Ruiz Escudero [es], PP) to allow the transfer of old people to hospitals (22 and 31 March, 11 April), to no success.[17]

On 18 September, following an increase in the number of cases in the Community, the Autonomous Government decided to apply movement restrictions in various areas of the territory, especially in the south [18][19]. These measures were not welcomed by the citizens of the restricted areas, calling them unfair and even racist. Neighbourhood associations and other political personalities called for demonstrations denouncing the lack of investment and calling for the resignation of the community presidency [20][21]

Statistics[edit source | edit]

Patients currently in an ICU[edit source | edit]

Cumulative data[edit source | edit]

Data from Telemadrid and the Ministry of Health.[22][1]

COVID-19 cases in the Community of Madrid
Date Confirmed cases % change Deaths % change Recovered % change
25 February 2020 1
26 February 2020 2
27 February 2020 4
28 February 2020 5
29 February 2020 8
1 March 2020 10
2 March 2020 29
3 March 2020 49
4 March 2020 70
5 March 2020 90
6 March 2020 137
7 March 2020 174 4
8 March 2020 202 8
9 March 2020 469 8
10 March 2020 782 21
11 March 2020 1,024 31
12 March 2020 1,388 56
13 March 2020 1,990 81
14 March 2020 2,940 86
15 March 2020 3,544 213
16 March 2020 4,165 213
17 March 2020 4,871 355
18 March 2020 5,637 390
19 March 2020 6,777 498
20 March 2020 7,165 628
21 March 2020 8,921 804
22 March 2020 9,702 1,021
23 March 2020 10,575 1,263 2,063
24 March 2020 12,352 1,535 2,291
25 March 2020 14,597 1,825 3,031
26 March 2020 17,166 2,090 3,882
27 March 2020 19,243 2,412 5,044
28 March 2020 21,520 2,757 6,326
29 March 2020 22,677 3,082 7,491
30 March 2020 24,090 3,392 8,301
31 March 2020 27,509 3,603 9,330
1 April 2020 29,840 3,865 10,827
2 April 2020 32,155 4,175 12,400
3 April 2020 34,188 4,483 13,850
4 April 2020 36,249 4,723 15,362
5 April 2020 37,584 4,941 16,543
6 April 2020 38,723 5,136 17,322
7 April 2020 40,469 5,371 18,410
8 April 2020 42,450 5,586 19,836
9 April 2020 43,877 5,800 21,121
10 April 2020 44,783 5,972 22,414
11 April 2020 45,849 6,084 23,663
12 April 2020 46,587 6,278 24,683
13 April 2020 47,146 6,423 25,385
14 April 2020 48,048 6,568 26,247
15 April 2020 49,526 6,724 27,433
16 April 2020 50,694 6,877 28,491
17 April 2020 51,993 7,007 29,436
18 April 2020 52,946 7,132 30,475
19 April 2020 54,884 7,239 31,313
20 April 2020 56,963 7,351 31,762
21 April 2020 57,997 7,460 32,277
22 April 2020 59,199 7,577 33,032
23 April 2020 60,487 7,684 33,645
24 April 2020 61,726 7,765 34,212
25 April 2020 62,510 7,848 34,902
26 April 2020
27 April 2020
28 April 2020
29 April 2020
30 April 2020

References[edit source | edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "Lo que debes saber sobre el coronavirus Covid-19 en Madrid". Telemadrid. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  2. "Confirmado el primer caso de coronavirus en Madrid". Telemadrid. 25 February 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Mateo, Juan José (15 April 2020). "Madrid calcula que 300.000 habitantes han sido afectados por el coronavirus". El País.
  4. "La Comunidad de Madrid aprueba medidas extraordinarias por el coronavirus". Government of the Community of Madrid. 9 March 2020.
  5. Belver, Marta; Velloso, Isabel; Ley, Marta; Garcés, Carlos (11 March 2020). "Madrid cierra guarderías, colegios y universidades como mínimo 15 días". El Mundo.
  6. "La Comunidad de Madrid decreta el cierre obligatorio de bares, restaurantes y tiendas". El Independiente. 13 March 2020.
  7. Hernández, Marisol (13 March 2020). "Pedro Sánchez decreta el estado de alarma en toda España para frenar la expansión del coronavirus". El Mundo.
  8. García de Blas, Elsa; Pérez, Fernando J. (13 March 2020). "El estado de alarma 'no podía esperar más'". El País.
  9. Ministerio de la Presidencia, Relaciones con las Cortes y Memoria Democrática: "Real Decreto 463/2020, de 14 de marzo, por el que se declara el estado de alarma para la gestión de la situación de crisis sanitaria ocasionada por el COVID-19" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (67): 25390–25400. 14 March 2020. ISSN 0212-033X.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Peinado, Fernando (21 June 2020). "Los 12 días de la "operación Bicho": el fiasco del plan de la Comunidad de Madrid para salvar las residencias". El País.
  11. Rejón, Raúl (6 April 2020). "Los Burgueño: el apellido de la privatización sanitaria al que recurre Díaz Ayuso para la epidemia más grave en 100 años". eldiario.es.
  12. Peinado, Fernando; Mateo, Juan José (11 June 2020). "Los mayores con seguro privado sí fueron trasladados de residencias a hospitales en Madrid". El País.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Mateo, Juan José; Peinado, Fernando (20 June 2020). "La muerte indigna: reconstrucción de la tragedia de las residencias de ancianos en Madrid". El País.
  14. Peinado, Fernando; Sosa Troya, María (31 March 2020). "La Comunidad de Madrid intervendrá ocho residencias privadas desbordadas por el coronavirus". El País.
  15. García Rada, Asier (2020). "Covid-19: the precarious position of Spain's nursing homes" (PDF). BMJ. 369 (369): m1554. doi:10.1136/bmj.m1554. PMID 32312710.
  16. Jones, Sam (7 May 2020). "Madrid public health director resigns as region seeks to lift lockdown". The Guardian. The director of public health for the Madrid region has resigned, apparently in protest at the regional government’s decision to seek to loosen lockdown restrictions in the area of Spain hardest hit by the coronavirus.
  17. Gómez, Virginia (1 June 2020). "Reyero revela que pidió tres veces a la Consejería de Sanidad no frenar el traslado de ancianos a hospitales". El Mundo.
  18. "(Press release 18/09/2020" (PDF).
  19. "Las "restricciones" a la movilidad que anunciará Madrid: en las zonas más afectadas y con "carácter inmediato"". www.20minutos.es - Últimas Noticias (in Spanish). 16 September 2020. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  20. Telemadrid. "Cientos de personas de la zona sur de Madrid se manifiestan en Sol contra las nuevas medidas".
  21. 20minutos. "Vecinos de municipios y barrios confinados del sur de Madrid toman la calle al grito de "Ayuso, dimisión"".
  22. "Alertas en Salud Pública de actualidad Enfermedad por nuevo coronavirus, COVID-19". Ministerio de Sanidad.

External links[edit source | edit]