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Talk:S'more

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Smore equals lower BAC -- Proven Fact[edit source | edit]

I was serious about the creator because the name you have is a common misconseption Louis Carlson Sr never invented the s'more he was given credit for the first person to eat a s'more. He never invented it at all. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Micahqgecko (talkcontribs) 10:05, 25 March 2010 (UTC)

Why was my comment "It is a known fact that Smores reduce Blood Alcohol Levels" removed?

The fat in the chocolate absorbs alcohol in the blood stream, thereby lowering the BAC after Smore ingestion. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.33.49.251 (talk) 15:59, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

That sounds more like a fact about chocolate, not a fact about s'mores. -- Charles Stover 15:31, 9 April 2013 (UTC)

If it is a "known fact" then provide a reference. Phrases like this are to be avoided as they beg more questions such as who knows it (I didn't) and what is the basis for their knowledge. If you have evidence, by all means provide a reputable link and reinstate the comment. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.171.148.180 (talk) 14:23, 30 May 2010 (UTC)

unsourced claim[edit source | edit]

I have removed the following questionable claim posted by 168.122.80.196:

It is postulated that a young girl named Megan Janicki coined this phrase, and this concoction, in 1927 while camping on the banks of the Ohio River on a chilly night.

There was no source for this claim, and a Google search only finds copies and mirrors of this article. If there is an independent source for this claim, then it can be reinstated. Spiffy sperry 00:17, 26 October 2005 (UTC)

advertisement?[edit source | edit]

take out the advertisement for Xando/Cosí

agreed im on it M@$+@ Ju ~ 22:13, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

I added th'information about Xando, and it wasn't an advertisement, it was useful information. I don't necessarily mind that it was taken out if people were really that offended, but the statement that it is "traditionally" Hershey's chocolate is even more ridiculous!--Signor Giuseppe 13:37, 19 July 2006 (UTC)

something wrong with origins? or with the Mallomar link?[edit source | edit]

If the Mallomar is a "version" of the s'more, how can it be older than the s'more? According to this article, the s'more is first mentioned in 1927. According to the article on Mallomars (which doesn't even mention s'mors, btw), the Mallomar is from 1913. --345Kai 07:08, 10 May 2006 (UTC)

Microwave S'mores[edit source | edit]

If there's anything offensive here, it's the lack of mention of microwave s'mores! In my opinion, they are infinately better than campfire s'mores, even if they lack being a social experience. The chocolate gets gooey, the marshmallow expands and gets soft, and the graham crackers get softer in the microwave, and the process only takes 20 seconds. In fact, I just had a mircowave s'more tonight. Delicious!

In fact, the picture in this article looks exactly like all microwave s'mores do. --711groove 05:56, 22 October 2006 (UTC)

If you microwave them you don't get the caramelization from the browning which is the best part. You can also make s'mores with Reeses Cups ( best! ), Heath Toffee bars, Hershey's Almond bars, and sliced Milky Ways.96.40.122.12 (talk) 04:27, 24 May 2016 (UTC)


Kellogg's S'mores Pop-Tart[edit source | edit]

Does this product deserve a mention here? http://www2.kelloggs.com/Product/ProductDetail.aspx?brand=202&product=443&cat=poptarts —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 68.237.198.106 (talk) 05:02, 6 May 2007 (UTC).

Says Who?[edit source | edit]

"August 10 is National S'more Day"

About.com is not a source. This is 100% wikiality. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.143.131.114 (talk) 11:39, 15 December 2007 (UTC)

Spp[edit source | edit]

Would smors be just plain illiterate spelling or an acceptable variant? 198.54.202.242 (talk) 14:48, 28 March 2008 (UTC)

name origin[edit source | edit]

Is it possible that the name s'more actually comes from the German word schmoren, meaning "to roast"? And then the spelling "s'more" and its generally accepted etymology would just be backronymic? Halverso (talk) 15:04, 16 August 2008 (UTC)

Some word similar to schmoren may be the original, but not schmoren itself, because it means to braise or stew. A "dish" like this, if freshly invented, would be invented in many places at once, so not end up with the same strange name. But if it's a variant on some other recipe already known, it could inherit a corruption of that name. The only other way for an odd name to propogate widely is if it's featured in a popular magazine or cook book.- KoolerStill (talk) 00:41, 10 June 2009 (UTC)

pronunciation[edit source | edit]

Currently the article has pronunciation listed as "shmores", I find this to be unacceptable, especially since there is clearly an apostrophe after the S indicating that it is pronounced as "S", not "Sh". (Lucas(CA) (talk) 00:58, 5 September 2008 (UTC))

shmore would be a hint to the previous (convincing) suggestion. 84.19.208.206 (talk) 04:57, 16 October 2014 (UTC)

S'mores in Popular Culture[edit source | edit]

The "Curb Your Enthusiasm" example seems really weak. I haven't seen the show, but unless a plot point hinges on the fact, is it really even *slightly* notable that a character says he hates s'mores? 86.136.250.154 (talk) 19:24, 1 October 2008 (UTC)

Britain[edit source | edit]

As Graham Crackers are not widely available in Britain, we tend to use chocolate digestives (this is handy because it covers both the 'cracker' and the chocolate). Should this be included? In, say, a "S'mores Worldwide" section?

Sure. Doctorfluffy (robe and wizard hat) 02:05, 23 September 2009 (UTC)
We don't *tend* to use anything at all, since s'mores don't really exist outside North America, unless they've been deliberately borrowed. 109.149.143.15 (talk) 02:10, 26 March 2012 (UTC)


Canada[edit source | edit]

In the west at least, Canadians believe they came up with S'mores, and they're seen as quintessentially Canadian. There's even a restaurant in Vancouver that sells S'more fondue. I believe their faith in Canadian S'morigin is unfounded, but throw it out there. 24.85.252.83 (talk) 15:00, 10 October 2012 (UTC)

S'Mores in South Carolina[edit source | edit]

What do they call s'mores in South Carolina?--75.82.253.4 (talk) 06:45, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

I don't know what Steven Colbert called them, but The Colbert Report used this photo from Commons to illustrate one. Jonathunder (talk) 13:44, 12 February 2011 (UTC)

1920s campfire book[edit source | edit]

  • This is an interesting find. I found a mention to ordering it a February 1927 issue of Good Housekeeping.[1]. So we don't know when in the 1920s it was published. When I last looked into the "who invented question" (and sorted out the hoax stuff), I concluded the invention could not be realistically be before the early 1920s because mass marshmallow production had not been invented until around that time.--Milowenthasspoken 17:59, 25 September 2015 (UTC)

Singular/plural[edit source | edit]

Is there some reason why "s'mores" is sometimes (but not always) used as a singular? I don't think I've ever heard anyone use anything but "s'more" as the singular. Animatorgeek (talk) 01:09, 4 July 2017 (UTC)

S'more eyes from time to time.[edit source | edit]

Editors who'd like to watchlist this article are always welcome. This article has been the subject of creative vandalism from time to time. Most notably, around 2009-13, it claimed that "Loretta Scott Crew" had invented s'mores, which creeped into books and sources all over the place. Wikiafripedia:Articles for deletion/Loretta Scott Crew. Happened to stop by today and see more baloney had creeped in again.--Milowenthasspoken 20:29, 4 March 2019 (UTC)